Improving python/water change system questions

MoshJosh

I want to streamline my water changing process. Currently I use a garden hose and syphon water to my back yard via gravity. Then I fill tanks using an aqueon graven vac/water change system that attaches to my sink. The issues with this system are:
1. When I attempt to siphon water sometimes the the weight of the hose and water make it fall out of the tank and I have to start the siphon again.
2. My sink is on the other side of the house and I have to run up and down the stairs to turn the water on and off (the only time I used the valve on the end of the vac the tube ruptured and soaked my carpet. . . my wife was angry).
3. I don't have anything to divert the flow at the end of the tubing so if I am not careful I will dislodge plants, move substrate, and sometimes move hard scape. . .

My plan is to keep the system the same in principal, i.e. siphon to backyard and fill from sink but. . . I want to get 2 python hooks for both hoses, get a stronger hose that I know wont rupture, add a valve just before the hook so I can start and stop the water without running up stairs, put a pre filter type sponge (or something similar) on the siphon so I don't rehome any fish to my backyard, and add something to divert flow on the fill tube so I don't stir things up to badly.

Questions:
1. Is the python equipment compatible with regular garden hose type fittings/threads?
2. Is a garden type hose an aquarium safe option for both hoses or should I get something else?
3. If not garden type hose what hose should I use that wont rupture?
4. Can I get PVC valves/fittings that are compatible with all the things mentioned above?
5. What can I use to divert flow/make it more gentle so I don't disturb the plants, substrate, and scape?
6. Also what are your thoughts on those expanding garden hoses? The one in my backyard works great and easy to store? Could I safely use this for filling the tank?

Your thoughts?
 

John58ford

I'm designing a system so my oldest boy can water change by himself so I've been looking at the same issues/solutions.

You can build a horseshoe/U out of pvc to act as your siphon, then you could hang a rigid assembly on the side of the tank vs hose. They make fittings for it to connect straight to your garden hose so you can still run it out the door. You can set a depth this way by building a couple different "U" drains too and if you use a screen/cover of some sort you could walk away while the tank drains. Putting a T fitting on the end in the tank will stop it from blowing sand around when it breaks siphon.

For filling, you could make a similar horseshoe, putting a T fitting on the inside of the tank would direct the water outward instead of down to prevent blowing sand etc. You could also build rain bars to attach to the t fitting and that would really spread the flow.

They make special "garden" hoses that are food safe for filling the drinking water tanks on R.V.s and boats. Since you will be filling the tanks with warm water I think that would be a sound investment for the refills.

The way you tap into the water is the trick. I am looking at an "adjustable scald protector" (temperature regulator) that adjusts all the way down to 80 degrees fahrenheit, it would connect under my bathroom sink the fittings are simple, and I v would just add a Y to each leg (so the sink still works lol). Both the hot and the cold go into the scald protector and when you first turn it on it lets out straight hot water, as it detects the temperature rising it mixes in cold water to get the desired temperature, there's only one outlet. The trick is adapting the garden hose connector to a sink connector coming off the temperature regulator. I have found fittings to do the opposite at my local hardware store for dishwashers but not what I'm looking for yet.


I don't know anything about python threads, I had a water bed filler/drain that worked off of the same principles that connected to a garden hose though.
 
Upvote 0

Dechi

You can buy a python with 50 feet of tubing I believe. Mine is 30 feet and I’ve had it for more than 15 years and it’s still going. They’re very well built, good quality and durable.
 
Upvote 0

Sanderguy777

I want to streamline my water changing process. Currently I use a garden hose and syphon water to my back yard via gravity. Then I fill tanks using an aqueon graven vac/water change system that attaches to my sink. The issues with this system are:
1. When I attempt to siphon water sometimes the the weight of the hose and water make it fall out of the tank and I have to start the siphon again.
2. My sink is on the other side of the house and I have to run up and down the stairs to turn the water on and off (the only time I used the valve on the end of the vac the tube ruptured and soaked my carpet. . . my wife was angry).
3. I don't have anything to divert the flow at the end of the tubing so if I am not careful I will dislodge plants, move substrate, and sometimes move hard scape. . .

My plan is to keep the system the same in principal, i.e. siphon to backyard and fill from sink but. . . I want to get 2 python hooks for both hoses, get a stronger hose that I know wont rupture, add a valve just before the hook so I can start and stop the water without running up stairs, put a pre filter type sponge (or something similar) on the siphon so I don't rehome any fish to my backyard, and add something to divert flow on the fill tube so I don't stir things up to badly.

Questions:
1. Is the python equipment compatible with regular garden hose type fittings/threads?
2. Is a garden type hose an aquarium safe option for both hoses or should I get something else?
3. If not garden type hose what hose should I use that wont rupture?
4. Can I get PVC valves/fittings that are compatible with all the things mentioned above?
5. What can I use to divert flow/make it more gentle so I don't disturb the plants, substrate, and scape?
6. Also what are your thoughts on those expanding garden hoses? The one in my backyard works great and easy to store? Could I safely use this for filling the tank?

Your thoughts?
To solve the hose falling out issue, I just got a large spring clamp and clamp the hose to the tank. I moved on from the spring clamp a while back to a plier type clamp that you squeeze and it ratchets down with an equal force to whatever you squeeze.
Here is a photo of one

Screenshot_20210209-074230_Home Depot.jpg

Now to answer your actual questions lol

1. No, they use a different type of hose (vinyl I think, same as the Aqueon as far as I know. I have the Aqueon, but never used the Python brand specifically). Garden hoses are almost never see-through, and are not 100% vinyl. The good ones at least, have fiber or fabric woven in for strength and things.

2. I personally think any regular garden hose would be fine. I used to drink out of one when I was a kid, and the third eye has been nothing but a blessing! (Jk, no side effects of any kind from the water from a hose).
If you want to, go ahead and get the food grade one, but know that they are more money and a smaller diameter (slower empty and fill times).
I want to do the same thing one day, and plan on getting another one of these, dedicated to fish. (I already have one for the garden and love it).

Screenshot_20210209-075155_Home Depot.jpg

3. No hose made for water delivery will rupture (I mean garden or food grade hoses). They have woven shields and stuff inside to keep that from happening. I think your hose was probably defective, as I have used mine for years and never had an issue, but I never pressurized it either...

4. Yes and no. You can adapt from garden hose to pvc, but it depends on the ID (inner diameter) of the hose. I used some ½" id hose and had a hard time finding what I needed, but garden hose SHOULD be simpler to find stuff for.
If you go to Home Depot, either ask directions, or download their app, and find the pvc section there.(it tells the aisle and section number under specific items.) I wasted 15 or 20 minutes trying to find pvc in one a month ago, and it turned out to be in the garden section!
The adapters will usually be on the toilet and sink parts aisle, NOT with the pvc, though you might find garden hose adapters there...

5. I would do exactly what Johns58Ford said with the u shaped hook. (Buy a 10 or 30 pack of whatever size pvc 90* elbows, you'll use them!)
Then I would add a piece of pipe to each end of that elbow and cap it with a cap you have already drilled small holes in the end of. That should keep most fish that aren't fry out, and diffuse the water force.

6. I used one of those expanding hoses and it burst from water pressure, so I wouldn't use it.
I replaced it with one the of the ones I posted a picture of.
I saw the inside of one of the expanding ones (thanks to my experience lol), and they use an incredibly thin membrane inside an abrasion resistant fabric sleeve. That membrane is not very durable, and also, by the design of the hose, bending results in a kink. So I would get a good regular hose, rubber preferably (it kinks, but you can easily work it out, unlike some cheaper hoses that kink all the time, and you have to then go to the kink, fiddle with it, it kinks on down the line etc).

Sounds like a good project! I definitely need to do this myself. But I just went through the pain of adapting pvc with my filter build, so I think I'll save if for later lol.

Oh, one last thing. If you do anything with the pvc, glue it. Prime it too, if you don't mind blue or purple all over the pipes, but clear glue should be fine.
DO glue the T to the hose adapter, but don't glue anything past that (the pipe or caps with the holes) so you can change it if you want to.
 
Upvote 0

John58ford

Just a design note, cpvc has different ID and OD than pvc (despite the first Google expert search). Cpvc uses the old copper tube sizing. Sometimes it's marked as "CTS cpvc". Anyhow, morale of the story, if you need to pressure fit vinyl or flex hose directly to a pvc pipe, I recommend CTS CPVC. 3/4" vinyl heats and slides right onto 3/4" cpvc, almost all my pumps and spray bars are heated 1/2" id vinyl slid onto 1/2" cpvc. It's just as leak proof as a barb if you push it on an inch or more, but it doesn't wreck the hose if you use a hair dryer to take it back apart later. I wouldn't build your sink side stuff this way, but knowing that detail helps a little with avoiding the headaches Sanderguy777 might have experienced looking for adapters.

Another thing that may help if you do go with store bought solutions or choose to use vinyl; boil a big stock pot 3/4 full of water, slowly sink the coil of vinyl tube into it and let it heat for a few minutes. Then, using silicone gloves (and maybe tongs), slowly pull the hose out and stretch it across your house, you could lay down towels first. Make sure you are lifting it higher than the pot so you don't siphon boiling water. After it cools you should have a nice straight memory free hose that's less likely to kink or recoil during use. You can loop it over-under to store it and it should be straight for a long while. I re-boil all my stored occasional use vinyl hoses about once a year to keep them straight and clean.
 
Upvote 0

John58ford

MoshJosh , if you haven't set your design in stone yet I built my 50% drain systems today. I posted a build thread: John's DIY siphon system | Cleaning and Maintenance Forum | 489514

For some reason I thought jake37 was in on this thread too and referenced it a couple times today in a different post. I probably sounded a bit looney.

My wife finally cleared the Amazon cart so my temperature regulator should be here in a week or so. I'll do a thread on how I set that up too.
 
Upvote 0

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
3
Views
121
Tallen78
  • Question
Replies
7
Views
190
JaidWS
  • Question
75 Gallon Tank Help with Python Syphon
Replies
8
Views
173
jdhef
  • Question
Replies
8
Views
259
jtjgg
Replies
12
Views
443
John58ford

Random Great Thread

New Aquarium Equipment Threads

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom