Importance Of Poking New Soil Substrate

EMR

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My video just shows why one should be poking the substrate when starting a new soil tank (please disregard my 1 year old singing Twinkle Tiwnkle Little Star). In reading around, I guess the egg fart bubbles go away after a few months. But releasing the buildup regularly is important.

Literally everyone one of these bubbles smells like egg farts.... So far the fish seem to be doing well. Some of my plants (notably the A reneickii) are getting melted stems at the substrate. Maybe this is why?

1 1/2” - 2” soil topped by 1/2” - 3/4” black sand. Popular consensus says when using soil, use gravel or large sand to prevent anaerobic pockets. I’m finding that this is probably true

There’s slot of talk saying “sulfur bubbles are bad news” etc. But other than replacing oxygen in the water, no one really says why. The fish aren’t gasping for air, so I’m going to ride this one out and see where it goes.

I’d love to hear thoughts from the collective!
 

Annie59

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I have never poked the soil nor do I stir sand. I am perplexed about all these problems with sand and soil "gas" bubbles .Never had it happen in any of my tanks. I'm not saying it doesn't happen. Just never have it happen in my tanks .
 

BettaMaxx

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From what I've read it does happen, especially if you don't agitate the soil during water changes. I think the main problem is not releasing the gases regularly because overtime it can become toxic to the fish if the bubble bursts in their face. Sorry, I don't know the science around this to give more input but hopefully other can weigh in.
 

SixThreeOh

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From my understanding, it's only toxic until it comes into contact with oxygen, which then neutralizes it. As long as your tank is decently oxygenated, it should be neutralized before it breaks the surface of your substrate.
 
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EMR

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I have never poked the soil nor do I stir sand. I am perplexed about all these problems with sand and soil "gas" bubbles .Never had it happen in any of my tanks. I'm not saying it doesn't happen. Just never have it happen in my tanks .
Really I started doing this because I noticed all the gas bubbles that would come out on their own. I also noticed a lot of posts saying people poke the soil with chopsticks. Which led me to this.

I have a dirt substrate with sand cap, it forms tons of bubbles when I push down on it, I usually push it once in a while, never any harm to fish.
I’m hoping that I may have the same results as you.

From what I've read it does happen, especially if you don't agitate the soil during water changes. I think the main problem is not releasing the gases regularly because overtime it can become toxic to the fish if the bubble bursts in their face. Sorry, I don't know the science around this to give more input but hopefully other can weigh in.
Hmm, interesting thought. I’ve got hardy fish ( danios and mollies for cycling). I’d be curious to see what happens if it breaches their gills. Really I just imagine them making the same face I do when I smell egg farts!

From my understanding, it's only toxic until it comes into contact with oxygen, which then neutralizes it. As long as your tank is decently oxygenated, it should be neutralized before it breaks the surface of your substrate.
Well, I have a decent amount of surface agitation from the filter output. But admittedly I’m shying away from the air pump as the one I have is loud as heck. I do have it on standby just incase though. So far the fish seem to be ok though almost three weeks in!
 
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