I'm not sure if my Betta is okay

CoconutTheBetta

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Hey, y'all! Recently I bought a female betta and she's been doing some funky stuff. She eats everything given to her, has bright colors, and is not lethargic. But she's been darting around the tank a lot and swims in circles in front the front of the tank. I just moved her from a 1/2 gallon to a 5.5. Also, compared to my other betta, it looks like she's breathing a lot harder. I think she may be stressed but at the same time, I'm not sure. Please help.
 

jkkgron2

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CoconutTheBetta said:
Hey, y'all! Recently I bought a female betta and she's been doing some funky stuff. She eats everything given to her, has bright colors, and is not lethargic. But she's been darting around the tank a lot and swims in circles in front the front of the tank. I just moved her from a 1/2 gallon to a 5.5. Also, compared to my other betta, it looks like she's breathing a lot harder. I think she may be stressed but at the same time, I'm not sure. Please help.
Water parameters? How recent was the move? She does sound stressed. Is she glass surfing?
 

Sauceboat

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CoconutTheBetta said:
Yeah she's glass surfing.

Ammonia: .5
Nirate: 0

Nitrite: 2

pH: 7.5

Yesterday I did a 25% water change and still have not retested the water since then. These parameters are before the water change.
You’re tank still isn’t cycled. Do 50% water changes until Nitrite and Ammonia are 0 and your fish should be fine.
 

jkkgron2

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CoconutTheBetta said:
Yeah she's glass surfing.

Ammonia: .5
Nirate: 0

Nitrite: 2

pH: 7.5

Yesterday I did a 25% water change and still have not retested the water since then. These parameters are before the water change.
The nitrites are at 2? I’m thinking you meant to type nitrates? I would do a 75% water change ASAP to bring them down. Any nitrites are deadly and would explain the odd behavior.
 

SouthAmericanCichlids

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jkkgron2 said:
The nitrites are at 2? I’m thinking you meant to type nitrates? I would do a 75% water change ASAP to bring them down. Any nitrites are deadly and would explain the odd behavior.
Lol. My mind just switched those 2 without thinking lol, yeah I think she most likely switched those 2.
 

jkkgron2

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SouthAmericanCichlids said:
Lol. My mind just switched those 2 without thinking lol, yeah I think she most likely switched those 2.
I tend to do that a lot. Lol. Hopefully they switched it around by accident.
 

Doom

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You can add a product like Nutrafin Cycle to fix your cycling. It will eat your ammonia and nitrites. Then water changes or live plants will take out the nitrates.

50% water change max 1 or 2 a week.

Your hardness, alkalinity, and pH seem all too high. You can fix that with tannins products(Indian almond leaves).
Tourmaline balls soften your water too.
 

jkkgron2

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Doom said:
You can add a product like Nutrafin Cycle to fix your cycling. It will eat your ammonia and nitrites. Then water changes or live plants will take out the nitrates.

50% water change max 1 or 2 a week.

Your hardness, alkalinity, and pH seem all too high. You can fix that with tannins products(Indian almond leaves).
Tourmaline balls soften your water too.
I’m not sure that I agree. I have hard water and a high pH, and absolutely no issues either. Right now the OP should be doing daily waterchanges until he gets those nitrites under control. Eventually he should do once or twice a week but he should do more rightnow.
 

Doom

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The recommended pH for a betta is 7. they can tolerate (6.5-8). You can't always see the issue with your eyes. That's why you have to respect the water parameters to prevent any future problems.
Betta prefers soft water. The harder it is the worst it is for him. Tourmaline balls help with the hardness and tannins will drop your pH and your alkalinity.

If you have an ammonia problem like the OP. You can use the Nutrafin Cycle to cycle properly your tank and make it safe for your fish.
 

jkkgron2

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Doom said:
The recommended pH for a betta is 7. they can tolerate (6.5-8). You can't always see the issue with your eyes.
Betta prefers soft water. The harder it is the worst it is for him. Tourmaline balls help with the hardness and tannins will drop your pH and your alkalinity.

If you have an ammonia problem like the OP. You can use the Nutrafin Cycle to cycle properly your tank and make it safe for your fish.
Bettas are very hardy fish and do fine. They have been captive bred for years and I’m an experienced keeper. I have had many bettas and only one has died of an overfeeding issue (I was gone at the time). I’m sorry but I really do think you’re wrong. Having a consistent pH is much better than a flunctuating one and since many bettas have been bred in hard water and Been perfectly fine I don’t see how that translates to them having issues?

I don’t have ammonia issues and sometimes products like that one don’t work. It depends on the individual bottle, some do, some don’t.
 

Doom

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Apparently some people can't still accept what's the truth. Respect the water parameters, kids. All it takes is some google research. Keep your pH as close as 7 as possible and your hardness between 5-20 dH or 70-300ppm.
 

jkkgron2

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Doom said:
Apparently some people can't still accept what's the truth. Respect the water parameters, kids. All it takes is some google research.
Look, I get you feel very strongly about this but I haven’t found any evidence saying that hard water does any damage to bettas. If people have bred, raised, and cared for bettas in hard water for centuries with no issues then I would say that pretty much proves bettas can thrive in hard water with zero problems. Looks like your the one who need to research more.
 

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