Im New To The Fish Hobby N Not Sure About How The Stocking Goes

Malek Mas

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
2
Points
3
Hello

i am new here n i currently have a 38g bow front marineland tank

current stock is:

2 painted platys
1 swordtail
1 dwarf gourami
1 dalmatian molly
1 all white molly
4 peppered corys

my question is am i fully stocked already? if not how many can i add more?
i would really like to get at least 1 angel fish.. if possible maybe one more gourami?

any information would help thank you very much

also im running 2 of the "marineland bio-wheel 200" filters on this tank to make sure filteration is never a problem...
 

endlercollector

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,770
Reaction score
706
Points
358
Experience
More than 10 years
You've got mostly tough fish, for which I must congratulate you. The dwarf gourami is the one questionable fish in there. If he doesn't make it, don't feel bad as they're hard to keep alive. For one thing, they really need soft, acidic water while your livebearers do best in hard, alkaline water, and the cory cats can adapt to it. DG's often come from Thailand, where they have the right kind of water for them, and they're exhausted by the time they arrive in the LFS. Very few make it. DG's sold in the US are typically males as they have brighter colors, so if this one survives, and you get another, they may not get along, but your tank may be big enough for them both to have some territory. I'd put a lot of plants in to let them get away from each other.

I wouldn't recommend an angel fish because, again, they like softer water. It's an Amazonian thing

If you have a mix of males and females among your livebearers, or even if they're all females, you will soon have fry. Let the adults eat as much as they like as that will help keep their numbers under control. There's a strong chance that your swordtail and platies will hybridize. Those fry may grow up to be interesting. Some people hybridize them on purpose.
 

TexasDomer

Fishlore Legend
Messages
33,059
Reaction score
9,021
Points
608
Experience
2 years
Welcome to Fishlore!

Angelfish are not temperature compatible with peppered cories - peppered cories should be in temps 74 F or below (your other fish are fine at 73 - 74 F, so I'd turn your temp down to there if you haven't already). The hard water isn't a problem though - tank bred angels and dwarf gourami are fine in hard water.

Male dwarf gouramis will fight, so I wouldn't add another gourami.

You could add another 4-6 peppered cories though (just the same species you already have). What about a school of zebra danios or white cloud mountain minnows?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5

Malek Mas

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
2
Points
3
wow that was fast and great info here thank you very much guys

guess i wont be getting my angel fish til i get a bigger tank then... lol

@TexasDomer so with the current stock that i have i could also add another 4-6 cories? thats actually great i sure will add more haha

and a school of white cloud mountain minnows sound good too... how many should i get of those do you think?

pretty much i just want to get the most out of my tank, its the only one i have right now and its sitting pretty in my living room and i just cant stop looking at it haha friends and family love it too

also i never thought about them breeding together and stuff.... thats interesting...
hopefully it doesnt get out of control haha ill just sit back and let nature take its course n ill deal with what happens accordingly
 

Ginni

New Member
Messages
18
Reaction score
4
Points
3
I need to add if you plane on getting more fish any type of guramie are awesome and get along great with other guramie and there are so many colors to choose from i personally own quite allot of guramies my self i have two blue guramies two opeline , two orange two pearl guramie and 4 dwarf guramie the trick to this is to make sure your guramies are all female as males will get territorial and you can tell by there top fin males will have a distinctive point to theirs and females are rounded and the females get along great with other community fish but stay away from angel fish they gey very nippy and aggressive with other fish !
 

TexasDomer

Fishlore Legend
Messages
33,059
Reaction score
9,021
Points
608
Experience
2 years
Gourami species should not be mixed, and male dwarf gouramis should not be mixed. Female dwarf gouramis are very uncommon in stores - they're a dull silver color.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11

Malek Mas

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
2
Points
3
So I've decided I'll add 4 more cories and 9 zebra danios and no more gourami...
How do you guys suggest I should do that the safe way?
Which ones first n how many at a time?

Again thank you all so much
 

TexasDomer

Fishlore Legend
Messages
33,059
Reaction score
9,021
Points
608
Experience
2 years
Is your tank fully cycled? Do you know about the nitrogen cycle? What are your water parameters? pH, temp, ammonia, nitrites, nitrates

If your tank is fully cycled, I would add 4 cories, wait a week, add 5 danios, wait a week, then add the remaining 4 danios (if it's too inconvenient to split the danios up, you can add all 9 at one time, just closely monitor water parameters)
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #13

Malek Mas

New Member
Messages
9
Reaction score
2
Points
3
yes I have a pretty good idea about the nitrogen cycle and unfortunately I am still dealing with it

I started this tank using TSS.. I bought the tank, set it up, put water in it, put conditioner in it and turned everything on..
about 2 days later I added the whole bottle of the TSS then about half a day after that I went n got the mollies, the gourami and the swardtail.
I didnt do any testing for 3 weeks, they looked like they were doing fine eating and swimming everywhere, and then on like the 23rd day I did my 1st testings... it read: pH7.6, highrange pH 7.4, ammonia 0, nitrites 0.25, nitrate 5.0
the next day i tested again, it read pH7.6, highrange pH7.4, ammonia 0, nitrites 0, nitrate 5.0... I kept testing every day for about a week n kept getting the same results.

week 4 everything looked good so I went and got the 4 corys

after a week of getting the corys I tested again, I got: ammonia .25, nitrites 0, nitrates between 5.0 and 10
I didnt know what to do so I waited 2 days and it was still reading the same thing so I went ahead and did a bout 25% WC with gravel vacuum.
waited 3 days and tested again and still got the same results
it is now about week 6 and I just tested last night and still got the same results... I did about another 25% WC with vacuum then tested again this mornign... it looks like the ammonia now has more yellow in it than before its like right between the 0 and the .25, definitely has a hint of very light green in it but everything else still the same.

well thats my situation right now and if you guys have any comments or suggestions please I would love to hear them.. I am a beginner and more information is always welcomed

and I wont be getting any of the the danios or the cories yet until everything is 100% of course
 

Dch48

Well Known Member
Messages
2,237
Reaction score
1,434
Points
208
Experience
More than 10 years
That AqAdvisor site is a joke. I put in the fish I had in my 10 gallon tank years ago that lived for 2-3 years with no problems and it said I would be way overstocked. I then made a list for a small tank, got the numbers, switched the tank size to a larger one with a bigger filter with the same fish list and the overstocking level went up. How can that be? I also put in my tank and filter size and it said I was overstocked with 3 Neon tetras. What a farce.

As I've said before, when we kept fish 50 years ago, we never tested anything, didn't know about a cycle, and kept one specimen of each fish we liked and had very few problems with anything. I agree with the guy who said the schooling fish thing is a racket so the store makes more money. I kept one Neon Tetra, one Zebra Danio, one Black Skirt Tetra, one Black Neon and single specimens of whatever else I wanted with no problems.

When we moved from New York to Florida, I put each one of my fish in a bag. The trip took 3 1/2 days and the only thing I did was to pump some fresh air into the bags every night. All the fish survived and were put back into the 10 gallon tank as soon as it was filled with tap water, dechlorinated of course. They all survived and thrived. Fresh water tropicals are tougher than they're made out to be.
 

bizaliz3

Fishlore Legend
Messages
14,910
Reaction score
17,718
Points
808
Experience
5 to 10 years
Dch48 said:
That AqAdvisor site is a joke. I put in the fish I had in my 10 gallon tank years ago that lived for 2-3 years with no problems and it said I would be way overstocked. I then made a list for a small tank, got the numbers, switched the tank size to a larger one with the same fish list and the overstocking level went up.

As I've said before, when we kept fish 50 years ago, we never tested anything, didn't know about a cycle, and kept one specimen of each fish we liked and had very few problems with anything. I agree with the guy who said the schooling fish thing is a racket so the store makes more money. I kept one Neon Tetra, one Zebra Danio, one Black Skirt Tetra, one Black Neon and single specimens of whatever else I wanted with no problems.
Most fish have a much longer life span than 2-3 years. So that says nothing. In fact, it says their life spans were significantly shortened by the small tank size, or overstocking. If a few years out of a fish that should live 10 is good for you, then so be it. (neon tetras, for example, have a lifespan of 5-10 years)

Also, what do you consider "no problems"? Sure schooling fish can survive without a school. But they are not happy thriving fish. They settle for what they have. Lack of schools won't kill them, but its far from ideal. Keeping one of each schooling fish you like to suit your own desires is very a selfish thing to do!

I guess everyone has a different opinion on what it means to have things "work" or to have "no problems". If you want happy fish that will show natural behaviors and live their full life span, then you are having plenty of problems. If you just want the fish to live for a little while, not show their natural behaviors and die young, then sure, no problem.

just because things used to be done a certain way, doesn't mean it was right or ideal.
 

Dch48

Well Known Member
Messages
2,237
Reaction score
1,434
Points
208
Experience
More than 10 years
When I say 2-3 years I mean at least that much. My Black Tetra (they weren't called skirted back then) lived at least five. If I have a fish that lives 2 years, that's good enough for me. Unless it's a Goldfish or an Oscar. Sure they may live longer in the wild if they don't get eaten. I looked up the Neon. It said max 5 years in an aquarium. Since this Neon tetra disease is now so common that it kills many before they even get sold, I would say that you're doing good if yours lasts one year. I really think that the fish you get today, due to the extra 50 years of commercial and/or tank breeding, are weaker than what we had 50 years ago.
 

bizaliz3

Fishlore Legend
Messages
14,910
Reaction score
17,718
Points
808
Experience
5 to 10 years
Dch48 said:
When I say 2-3 years I mean at least that much. My Black Tetra (they weren't called skirted back then) lived at least five. If I have a fish that lives 2 years, that's good enough for me. Unless it's a Goldfish or an Oscar. Sure they may live longer in the wild if they don't get eaten. I looked up the Neon. It said max 5 years in an aquarium. Since this Neon tetra disease is now so common that it kills many before they even get sold, I would say that you're doing good if yours lasts one year. I really think that the fish you get today, due to the extra 50 years of commercial and/or tank breeding, are weaker than what we had 50 years ago.
Ok I'll give you that. But I still think it is a selfish choice to keep schooling fish in singles in order to get the privilege of having more types of fish in the tank. I don't like seeing that advice given to newbies. But to each his own!! :)
 

TexasDomer

Fishlore Legend
Messages
33,059
Reaction score
9,021
Points
608
Experience
2 years
Malek Mas said:
yes I have a pretty good idea about the nitrogen cycle and unfortunately I am still dealing with it

I started this tank using TSS.. I bought the tank, set it up, put water in it, put conditioner in it and turned everything on..
about 2 days later I added the whole bottle of the TSS then about half a day after that I went n got the mollies, the gourami and the swardtail.
I didnt do any testing for 3 weeks, they looked like they were doing fine eating and swimming everywhere, and then on like the 23rd day I did my 1st testings... it read: pH7.6, highrange pH 7.4, ammonia 0, nitrites 0.25, nitrate 5.0
the next day i tested again, it read pH7.6, highrange pH7.4, ammonia 0, nitrites 0, nitrate 5.0... I kept testing every day for about a week n kept getting the same results.

week 4 everything looked good so I went and got the 4 corys

after a week of getting the corys I tested again, I got: ammonia .25, nitrites 0, nitrates between 5.0 and 10
I didnt know what to do so I waited 2 days and it was still reading the same thing so I went ahead and did a bout 25% WC with gravel vacuum.
waited 3 days and tested again and still got the same results
it is now about week 6 and I just tested last night and still got the same results... I did about another 25% WC with vacuum then tested again this mornign... it looks like the ammonia now has more yellow in it than before its like right between the 0 and the .25, definitely has a hint of very light green in it but everything else still the same.

well thats my situation right now and if you guys have any comments or suggestions please I would love to hear them.. I am a beginner and more information is always welcomed

and I wont be getting any of the the danios or the cories yet until everything is 100% of course
Any time you see ammonia or nitrites, you can do a water change to remove them and help protect your fish. No need to wait a few days and check again first.

Be sure to keep up with weekly water change maintenance, even if you have no ammonia or nitrites. 50% weekly is a good place to start

I would lower your temp to 72-73 F for your fish - 76 F is too high for that species of cory
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom