I’m ashamed of myself and I want to make things right... - Page 2

Ouse

I’ve been contemplating my fishkeeping choices as of lately and I feel as if I’m doing things wrong. I’m beginning to grow tired of using plastic plants because I’ve seen many users on the forum label them as bad, and they describe the many benefits of using live plants. I feel bad about myself, so I decided to create this thread so I can apologise and learn to make things right.

I have four aquariums. I have my newly cycled 5 gallon and 15 gallon tanks, which both contain big gravel chunks to which I feel aren’t suitable for live plants. There’s my 60 gallon, which houses large cichlids (such as a geophagus) that’ll likely uproot any live plants. These three tanks are out of question, but there’s one left which I feel could work: my 30 gallon community. This tank uses sand as the substrate, driftwood and rocks for decoration and has some plastic plants already. With help from others (and my parents) I could turn things around in this tank regarding the planting.

The filtration and airstone in the 30 gallon are both strong, and they need to be. Provided that this fast rate of oxygenation can deplete the tank of Co2 I can’t guarantee that it’s 100% safe for plants, so I’d like some clarification on this. I‘d also greatly appreciate advice on how to feed plants and provide nutrients to the substrate. The sand has a small layer of brown algae, and some spot algae is on the glass, so I’m wondering if this means anything. The tank is next to a window so any plants will have sunlight.

I’m not looking for plants that break off or transition from land-based to aquatic or vice-versa. I’ve heard that anubias and amazon swords are both tough plants that are hard to kill and are both suitable in fully-aquatic environments. I will decline getting moss balls. Any other recommendations (based on info I’ve provided) I’d appreciate.

Any plants I add will consume nitrate and hopefully introduce harmless hitchhikers to the tank that are also beneficial to the ecosystem. An aspect of live plants that’s scared me for the longest time is their tendency to introduce any hitchhiker to the aquarium, including dangerous ones such as anchor worms and zebra mussels (although the chance of these ones occurring is low). Is quarantining plants absolutely necessary?

Thanks for any advice I receive here; it’ll make me feel much better. With nearly five years of experience I should know all of this by now. If my parents allow for it I’ll try to incorporate live plants into my 30 gallon if it’s suitable. I feel bad...
 

Seasoldier

Hi, you have no need to feel sorry or apologise, your tank is your tank & only you can judge whether it's good. I see nothing wrong with good artificial plants, the silk like ones look very realistic & as long as you have good filtration & surface agitation to allow oxygen to dissolve in the water live plants are not totally necessary, I can tell you I have a very heavily planted 5 foot tank & sometimes I wish I didn't, keeping all the plants tidy & in check can be time consuming & a bit of a pain.
 
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Msdp11009

I’ve been contemplating my fishkeeping choices as of lately and I feel as if I’m doing things wrong. I’m beginning to grow tired of using plastic plants because I’ve seen many users on the forum label them as bad, and they describe the many benefits of using live plants. I feel bad about myself, so I decided to create this thread so I can apologise and learn to make things right.

I have four aquariums. I have my newly cycled 5 gallon and 15 gallon tanks, which both contain big gravel chunks to which I feel aren’t suitable for live plants. There’s my 60 gallon, which houses large cichlids (such as a geophagus) that’ll likely uproot any live plants. These three tanks are out of question, but there’s one left which I feel could work: my 30 gallon community. This tank uses sand as the substrate, driftwood and rocks for decoration and has some plastic plants already. With help from others (and my parents) I could turn things around in this tank regarding the planting.

The filtration and airstone in the 30 gallon are both strong, and they need to be. Provided that this fast rate of oxygenation can deplete the tank of Co2 I can’t guarantee that it’s 100% safe for plants, so I’d like some clarification on this. I‘d also greatly appreciate advice on how to feed plants and provide nutrients to the substrate. The sand has a small layer of brown algae, and some spot algae is on the glass, so I’m wondering if this means anything. The tank is next to a window so any plants will have sunlight.

I’m not looking for plants that break off or transition from land-based to aquatic or vice-versa. I’ve heard that anubias and amazon swords are both tough plants that are hard to kill and are both suitable in fully-aquatic environments. I will decline getting moss balls. Any other recommendations (based on info I’ve provided) I’d appreciate.

Any plants I add will consume nitrate and hopefully introduce harmless hitchhikers to the tank that are also beneficial to the ecosystem. An aspect of live plants that’s scared me for the longest time is their tendency to introduce any hitchhiker to the aquarium, including dangerous ones such as anchor worms and zebra mussels (although the chance of these ones occurring is low). Is quarantining plants absolutely necessary?

Thanks for any advice I receive here; it’ll make me feel much better. With nearly five years of experience I should know all of this by now. If my parents allow for it I’ll try to incorporate live plants into my 30 gallon if it’s suitable. I feel bad...
Do something because it is what you want not what other posters prefer. If you like your plastic or silk plants does it matter if someone on the internet thinks that is “ugly” (your words). Nope. There will always be a preference for and against everything in life. Go with what you like or can manage and don’t apologize. This is not mistake territory1

ok off my motherly soap box! There are good beginner plants like anubias and java fern that you can use gel based super glue/ gorilla glue or similar to adhere to rocks, wood, etc. their roots should not be planted. Amazon sword can grow enormous. I have the most luck with anubias and they come in many varieties. My javas reproduce but are not big or the healthiest. Ferts seem to be off and make things worse. My anubias thrives. Personally I do a mixture of live and fake plants now but for about 15 years I did fake only no apologies!
 
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Ouse

I’ll probably get live plants, root tabs and cyanoacrylate glue tomorrow. My mum is very much on board with the idea of live plants but I still need to convince my dad that it’s a good idea. He still thinks that live plants will destroy the tank and that keeping them is an impossible feat. o_O I’ll provide him with all of the information I’ve been given on this thread.

I’m fine with keeping live plants with my plastic plants. I want to keep both as replacing all of my plastic plants with live ones is a huge change. Trying live plants for the first time will give me something to do.

I have everything figured out. I only want live plants for my 30 gallon as it‘s the only tank I have that’s hospitable for live plants. I rearranged the scape so the anubias and java fern will have access to lots of sunlight. I’ll attach them to one of the rocks with a cyanoacrylate glue.
 
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Msdp11009

I’ll probably get live plants, root tabs and cyanoacrylate glue tomorrow. My mum is very much on board with the idea of live plants but I still need to convince my dad that it’s a good idea. He still thinks that live plants will destroy the tank and that keeping them is an impossible feat. o_O I’ll provide him with all of the information I’ve been given on this thread.

I’m fine with keeping live plants with my plastic plants. I want to keep both as replacing all of my plastic plants with live ones is a huge change. Trying live plants for the first time will give me something to do.

I have everything figured out. I only want live plants for my 30 gallon as it‘s the only tank I have that’s hospitable for live plants. I rearranged the scape so the anubias and java fern will have access to lots of sunlight. I’ll attach them to one of the rocks with a cyanoacrylate glue.
I think that is a great way to start! No co2 needed for these plants either!
 
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Ouse


276AE4D3-C338-42FF-B05C-282309943231.jpeg
E7D2D7EF-CE00-4429-AE7C-E5F009B6DE72.jpeg
953DE08B-3DBD-41C3-BCC4-DFD440D75622.jpeg
Crypts are in! Not sure which crypt species they are; LFS had no wendtii.

First picture is the crypts in the bag.
Second picture is the crypts in the tank.
Third picture is the melted leaves and the root tabs.

I added a root tab under each one.

Of course I owe everyone here a huge thanks as you’re the people who made this possible. You should feel very great about yourselves. :happy:
 
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ProudPapa

The crypts look good. I wouldn't worry about the loose leaves. The outside ones break off all the time when I'm handling the plants.
 
Upvote 0

flopperfrog

I’ve been contemplating my fishkeeping choices as of lately and I feel as if I’m doing things wrong. I’m beginning to grow tired of using plastic plants because I’ve seen many users on the forum label them as bad, and they describe the many benefits of using live plants. I feel bad about myself, so I decided to create this thread so I can apologise and learn to make things right.

I have four aquariums. I have my newly cycled 5 gallon and 15 gallon tanks, which both contain big gravel chunks to which I feel aren’t suitable for live plants. There’s my 60 gallon, which houses large cichlids (such as a geophagus) that’ll likely uproot any live plants. These three tanks are out of question, but there’s one left which I feel could work: my 30 gallon community. This tank uses sand as the substrate, driftwood and rocks for decoration and has some plastic plants already. With help from others (and my parents) I could turn things around in this tank regarding the planting.

The filtration and airstone in the 30 gallon are both strong, and they need to be. Provided that this fast rate of oxygenation can deplete the tank of Co2 I can’t guarantee that it’s 100% safe for plants, so I’d like some clarification on this. I‘d also greatly appreciate advice on how to feed plants and provide nutrients to the substrate. The sand has a small layer of brown algae, and some spot algae is on the glass, so I’m wondering if this means anything. The tank is next to a window so any plants will have sunlight.

I’m not looking for plants that break off or transition from land-based to aquatic or vice-versa. I’ve heard that anubias and amazon swords are both tough plants that are hard to kill and are both suitable in fully-aquatic environments. I will decline getting moss balls. Any other recommendations (based on info I’ve provided) I’d appreciate.

Any plants I add will consume nitrate and hopefully introduce harmless hitchhikers to the tank that are also beneficial to the ecosystem. An aspect of live plants that’s scared me for the longest time is their tendency to introduce any hitchhiker to the aquarium, including dangerous ones such as anchor worms and zebra mussels (although the chance of these ones occurring is low). Is quarantining plants absolutely necessary?

Thanks for any advice I receive here; it’ll make me feel much better. With nearly five years of experience I should know all of this by now. If my parents allow for it I’ll try to incorporate live plants into my 30 gallon if it’s suitable. I feel bad...
if you want to make sure you dont get any hitchhiker, you can get tissue culture plants!
 
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Ouse

if you want to make sure you dont get any hitchhiker, you can get tissue culture plants!
Most hitchhikers don’t bother me. I already have trumpet snails in the tank anyway. If I get ramshorns and/or bladders too I accept that the home aquarium is an ecosystem where this is normal. I particularly like snails and detritus worms.
 
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allysoncain07

I’ve been contemplating my fishkeeping choices as of lately and I feel as if I’m doing things wrong. I’m beginning to grow tired of using plastic plants because I’ve seen many users on the forum label them as bad, and they describe the many benefits of using live plants. I feel bad about myself, so I decided to create this thread so I can apologise and learn to make things right.

I have four aquariums. I have my newly cycled 5 gallon and 15 gallon tanks, which both contain big gravel chunks to which I feel aren’t suitable for live plants. There’s my 60 gallon, which houses large cichlids (such as a geophagus) that’ll likely uproot any live plants. These three tanks are out of question, but there’s one left which I feel could work: my 30 gallon community. This tank uses sand as the substrate, driftwood and rocks for decoration and has some plastic plants already. With help from others (and my parents) I could turn things around in this tank regarding the planting.

The filtration and airstone in the 30 gallon are both strong, and they need to be. Provided that this fast rate of oxygenation can deplete the tank of Co2 I can’t guarantee that it’s 100% safe for plants, so I’d like some clarification on this. I‘d also greatly appreciate advice on how to feed plants and provide nutrients to the substrate. The sand has a small layer of brown algae, and some spot algae is on the glass, so I’m wondering if this means anything. The tank is next to a window so any plants will have sunlight.

I’m not looking for plants that break off or transition from land-based to aquatic or vice-versa. I’ve heard that anubias and amazon swords are both tough plants that are hard to kill and are both suitable in fully-aquatic environments. I will decline getting moss balls. Any other recommendations (based on info I’ve provided) I’d appreciate.

Any plants I add will consume nitrate and hopefully introduce harmless hitchhikers to the tank that are also beneficial to the ecosystem. An aspect of live plants that’s scared me for the longest time is their tendency to introduce any hitchhiker to the aquarium, including dangerous ones such as anchor worms and zebra mussels (although the chance of these ones occurring is low). Is quarantining plants absolutely necessary?

Thanks for any advice I receive here; it’ll make me feel much better. With nearly five years of experience I should know all of this by now. If my parents allow for it I’ll try to incorporate live plants into my 30 gallon if it’s suitable. I feel bad...

image.jpg
This is my 30 gal fully planted tank. I started out with a lot of stem plants which grow like crazy. Putting java moss on driftwood is an easy addition to the tank starting out. I don’t recommend planting a bunch of grass, it will not grow unless you have CO2 going in the tank (which is what I have now). One of my fav plants is the red tiger lilly, it takes a while to grow from a bulb but the process is worth it! Floating plants are another great option (I prefer frog it). I think the plants do SO MUCH for the tank and make for happy fish, glad you’re going for it.
 
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flopperfrog

Most hitchhikers don’t bother me. I already have trumpet snails in the tank anyway. If I get ramshorns and/or bladders too I accept that the home aquarium is an ecosystem where this is normal. I particularly like snails and detritus worms.
ahhh i thought you said you were very concerned about hitchhikers. its usually a good idea to try to get plants by themselves bc you really dont know what could be there. it might be harmless or it might be deadly
 
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allysoncain07

Bravo for realizing errors and wanting to learn more to make your fishes' lives better!

More knowledgeable members can answer you about substrate, gravel/sand and plant choices. I advise you to not welcome any hitchhikers. I always rinsed my newly-bought aquarium plants and even examined the leaves and ran my fingers over them gently to check for unwanted guests. Sometimes, I briefly quarantined them in a bucket of water. Until, some years ago, I discovered the error of my ways.
It wasn't enough! One day, while observing my fish, I noticed some strange movement -- what appeared at first to be a fish was going up and down in a corner of the aquarium. On closer observation, it moved gracefully from one end of the aquarium to another and then I could no longer see it. I couldn't imagine how another fish had gotten into my tank. I didn't see it again but fish began to disappear! This had never happened before. (I haven't had a sick fish in twenty years or maybe longer. They sometimes die, but it's old age. I currently have a 5 1/2 year-old Green Neon Tetra.)

I finally caught another glimpse of the intruder and realized it wasn't a fish. Googling helped me to identify it as a damselfly nymph. It managed to wipe out most the fish in my tank before I wiped it out. In the days that followed, another five showed up and a dead damselfly stuck to the inside of the aquarium hood. I read up on damsel flies and learned that they lay a great many eggs (I think it was over a hundred) and that the eggs can take years to hatch! YIKES! So I had to put the few remaining fish and whatever dwarf shrimps I could find into a quarantine tank and completely empty, clean and renovate my tank!

Ever since, I diligently go through the previous procedure but quarantine new plants for at least a week, sometimes longer. Some people "dip" their plants and I believe there are posts on the forum as to what they use. Please be careful. You could bring in parasites, diseases, killers like hydras or even those murderous damselfly nymphs!

Editing to add: the damselfly nymphs were masters of concealment and camouflage! Pale green, with long, slender bodies, they could easily pass for plant leaves (like Valisneria) and they hid grasping plants or vertically hiding at the side of the tank, where the frame was.

Snails can also sometimes carry diseases or parasites.
Oh my god well I now have a new fear of the damsel fly )): that sounds terrible!!!!! I have dipped plants that I found in the wild in a hydrogen peroxide wash and they’ve turned some of best growing plants in my tank, i think I’m gonna do this with more plants in the future bc it helps kill pest snails as well!
 
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ayeayeron

I'm not great with live plants, but I will always boast about how good my amazon swords grow in my tanks. I have very soft water with a pretty low pH, which may be why they thrive without any ferts, CO2, special lighting or even root tabs.

I suggest researching plants that thrive best in your water and going from there.

Also, as others have said, there is nothing wrong with fake plants. People tend to look down on plastic plants as they can tear fins, but there are still silk plants as well.
 
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Ouse

I'm not great with live plants, but I will always boast about how good my amazon swords grow in my tanks. I have very soft water with a pretty low pH, which may be why they thrive without any ferts, CO2, special lighting or even root tabs.

I suggest researching plants that thrive best in your water and going from there.

Also, as others have said, there is nothing wrong with fake plants. People tend to look down on plastic plants as they can tear fins, but there are still silk plants as well.
I have three crypts in there now. You mentioning a lower pH being good for plants is relieving because the water has lots of tannins. The water’s mineral content is quite hard though, being in the East of England.
 
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