Iguana Mini Pool Stocking Ideas

AJE
  • #1
So I just got a 254 gallon, 1’3” tall minI pool to put into my iguana’s new up graded area. So I was wondering what creatires do y’all recommend? (Not heated)
 
maggie thecat
  • #2
Wow! Iguanas are vegetarian? Right? I know they like fruit.

Is this an outdoor enclosure? What are your seasonal temperatures like?

Tell us more about the overall set up, please.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Wow! Iguanas are vegetarian? Right? I know they like fruit.

Is this an outdoor enclosure? What are your seasonal temperatures like?

Tell us more about the overall set up, please.
They are vegetarians, it is indoor high sixties low eighties,


I am planning on transferring some of the plants from my fish tank in it, some lily pads I also got a new filter which I am putting in the established tank and moving the old one to the minI pool to keep the water moving and to speed up cycling. The enclosure is next to a huge window, some sun will get in the pool
 
maggie thecat
  • #4
With that sort of temperature range I'm thinking something like an old fashioned sailfin molly. They get big, up to six inches, and would look good swimming in a group in such a large volume of water.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
With that sort of temperature range I'm thinking something like an old fashioned sailfin molly. They get big, up to six inches, and would look good swimming in a group in such a large volume of water.
I will investigate them, will there be any possibility of them being able to bite the iguanas, should they decide to go for a swim? Also I have three panda mollies could I put them in with the sail fins or would it be too cold for them.
 
maggie thecat
  • #6
They won't bite the iguana. The pandas could go in, I think. But the new hybrids aren't nearly as hardy as the old school type. I wonder if, as small as they are, they might be accidental prey for the iguana.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
They won't bite the iguana. The pandas could go in, I think. But the new hybrids aren't nearly as hardy as the old school type. I wonder if, as small as they are, they might be accidental prey for the iguana.
Iguanas are herbivores, even if they would try to eat a fish they would never catch it

I looked the sail fins up I don’t know how they would look from above, any other suggestions?

Also got any suggestion on how to make water changes less frequent I don’t really think I wan to take fifty gallons out and back in every week?
 
maggie thecat
  • #8
If you were willing to go brackish, there are Florida gobies available.

It's a big volume of water. They're outside of my wheelhouse, but maybe some cichlids ?
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
If it matters the iguanas are 2 ft long by the time I move them into the new area they will probably 2.5 feet long, I am letting the plants grow out
 
maggie thecat
  • #10
My experience with iguanas is limited to making friends with the ones at the hotels I stay at in the Carribean, so bear that in mind.

They didn't seem to spend much time in the water. Basking on the warm cement adjacent to ponds and pools, but not going for swims. I never saw any down by tidal pools either. (Although there were a fair few hanging out on the golf course.)

Do other keepers mix water features with iguana habitats?
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
If you were willing to go brackish, there are Florida gobies available.

It's a big volume of water. They're outside of my wheelhouse, but maybe some cichlids ?
If it matters the iguanas are 2 ft long by the time I move them into the new area they will probably 2.5 feet long, I am letting the plants grow out
I don’t think brackish is an option and cichlids look pretty thin from above I think it would have to be something wider, like a koi, I know koi get too big

My experience with iguanas is limited to making friends with the ones at the hotels I stay at in the Carribean, so bear that in mind.

They didn't seem to spend much time in the water. Basking on the warm cement adjacent to ponds and pools, but not going for swims. I never saw any down by tidal pools either. (Although there were a fair few hanging out on the golf course.)

Do other keepers mix water features with iguana habitats?
They hardly ever go swimming, except when scared or over heated, but they are very powerful swimmers, I is recommended. It helps with shedding and keeps the humidity up.
 
maggie thecat
  • #12
You could always go with goldfish. They get warm in outdoor ponds too.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
Ok so far It looks like I will transfer my pandas and be like every one else and get goldfish, unless someone recommends something else. How many gold fish could I put in, and what types?

I am moving the mollies because my guppies keep chasing them and thought it would be better for them to be in the pool or will the colder temperatures make it worse for them?
 
maggie thecat
  • #14
On the one hand, your pond is indoors, so you could have fancies, stocked at 20 gallons per fish. But because they are in with karge and somewhat clumsy iguanas, I would skip the ones with telescoping eyes or other weird mutations.

If you were to go with commons, comets or shubukins (good bet if you want something a bit on the pretty side.) They get bigger so require 50 gallons pef fish.

No mixing the two, though. Pick one or the other.

I think your mollies will be fine in the pond.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
Another option I would like to add is a couple of red ear sliders but I looked and I can’t find anyone who has said they keep them with iguanas I know they get big will they attack my iguanas?
 
maggie thecat
  • #16
I really don't know. Turtles may carry pathogens that would be detrimental to your iguanas. Otherwise, I don't think sliders are especially aggressive. Snapping turtles, on the otherhand, would be a definite no.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
On the one hand, your pond is indoors, so you could have fancies, stocked at 20 gallons per fish. But because they are in with karge and somewhat clumsy iguanas, I would skip the ones with telescoping eyes or other weird mutations.

If you were to go with commons, comets or shubukins (good bet if you want something a bit on the pretty side.) They get bigger so require 50 gallons pef fish.

No mixing the two, though. Pick one or the other.

I think your mollies will be fine in the pond.
So I could get four or five of those. They are selling some at my pet store about four inches, how long would it take for them to grow a bit? And off topic a bit, what does this “points” thing mean it says I have six on my profile?

I really don't know. Turtles may carry pathogens that would be detrimental to your iguanas. Otherwise, I don't think sliders are especially aggressive. Snapping turtles, on the otherhand, would be a definite no.
Thanks, I would never want to keep a snapping turtle I like my arms
 
maggie thecat
  • #18
Goldfish grow shockingly fast, under the right conditions. Last October I brought a fry I found into the house and overwintered it. You could barely see it, it was so small. It was 3 inches when I put it in my pond last month. That was a shubukin. They can grow six or more inches in a year and top out at a foot, although 8 to ten inches is more usual.

Oh. The points? No idea. Periodically the mods launch various user rating systems evaluating quality of posts. It might be tied to that . There's a how to use the forum subform. You could probably get an answer there.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
Can I keep red ear sliders with my iguanas or would they harm my iguans? Hi

Goldfish grow shockingly fast, under the right conditions. Last October I brought a fry I found into the house and overwintered it. You could barely see it, it was so small. It was 3 inches when I put it in my pond last month. That was a shubukin. They can grow six or more inches in a year and top out at a foot, although 8 to ten inches is more usual.
Cool you seem to know about ponds, my brother just got some koi, but a Herrin keeps taking them out and eating them any advise?

On the one hand, your pond is indoors, so you could have fancies, stocked at 20 gallons per fish. But because they are in with karge and somewhat clumsy iguanas, I would skip the ones with telescoping eyes or other weird mutations.

If you were to go with commons, comets or shubukins (good bet if you want something a bit on the pretty side.) They get bigger so require 50 gallons pef fish.

No mixing the two, though. Pick one or the other.

I think your mollies will be fine in the pond.
Do you mean I can’t mix mollies and golds or just not golds?
 
KinsKicks
  • #20
If you mean in the same tank....that would not really be possible. Completely different environments
 
maggie thecat
  • #21
You can't mix fancies and commons. You can mix other with temperate fish, although you may get some stick for doing so.

If you have birds fishing your pond then:

Cover the pond. They make netting for that purpose.

Give the fish places underwater to hide. I like plumbing pieces, but everyone has their preferences.

Scare away the birds. Hang mylar tape or mount a fake owl or hawk near the pond. They make some now that flap their wings in a semI realistic manner. Also, I seem to recall heron are territorial. If that is true, a fake heron might do the trick.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #22
If you mean in the same tank....that would not really be possible. Completely different environments
Yes I know, I am making it two different highlights the upper level will have tree tops, shelves and tables for the iguanas while the turtle will have a minI pool swim area. Each different temperatures. Will the slider hurt the iguanas, or should I just put gold fish in?
 
MD_Plants
  • #23
I wouldn’t really recromend to put anything in with an iguana, while it can be done, iguanas get big and need a lot of space. My iguana is 17 years old and has a whole cage to itself. I couldn’t imagine implementing in a water portion without spending a couple hundred ATLEAST or making a giant cage. The tank you are thinking about must be big had iguanas get very large.
 
Fanatic
  • #24
What species is the iguana?
Keeping them today without any issue and providing enough room would mean that the tank would need to be clearly over 150 gallons.
 
MD_Plants
  • #25
What species is the iguana?
Keeping them today without any issue and providing enough room would mean that the tank would need to be clearly over 150 gallons.

Just a normal green iguana that my dad got in college. The tank mine is in is a custom 6 x 3 x 12 cage with green large mesh stuff over it all. He is very only for an iguana and usually just lays in the top near he heat lamps.
 
Fanatic
  • #26
Just a normal green iguana that my dad got in college. The tank mine is in is a custom 6 x 3 x 12 cage with green large mesh stuff over it all. He is very only for an iguana and usually just lays in the top near he heat lamps.

Twelve feet high?
 
MD_Plants
  • #27
That’s right! Here is some pictures
Image1526409134.884366.jpg
Image1526409223.554073.jpg
Image1526409242.808519.jpg
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #28
What species is the iguana?
Keeping them today without any issue and providing enough room would mean that the tank would need to be clearly over 150 gallons.
I am setting up a simi-free-range area for the, I got a minI pool which is over 150 and I am going to make a frame 7’ by7’ put a tarp in, fill it with dirt, put plants in, fill the minI pool with water and either get turtles or gold fish, my question is, will the turtles be able to live with my green (common) iguanas? Or do y’all recommend something else? What plants do y’all recommend, bamboo, palm tree other stuff?


You can't mix fancies and commons. You can mix other with temperate fish, although you may get some stick for doing so.

If you have birds fishing your pond then:

Cover the pond. They make netting for that purpose.

Give the fish places underwater to hide. I like plumbing pieces, but everyone has their preferences.

Scare away the birds. Hang mylar tape or mount a fake owl or hawk near the pond. They make some now that flap their wings in a semI realistic manner. Also, I seem to recall heron are territorial. If that is true, a fake heron might do the trick.
Why not fancies and commons, I will was only going to get one species, but why?
 
MD_Plants
  • #29
I would look into tiny palms, like Howea species. The turtles and iguanas have diffrent needs but with a big enclosure you should be able to work it. I was actually going to do this a few years back but with Chinese water dragons. It was going to be a big wooden tank with half water and I was going to try to Incorperated an ecosystem, like hiding spots, plants, caves, and etc for guppises and fish like that, and turtles that could occasionally eat them and live on them while not eating them all, so an endless food source, theoretically. I also thought about little finches but there noisy. Then I was thinking about other lizards. The only reason I didn’t do this project was space. With enough equipment you can make anything out of a tank. Has iguanas get older they won’t move has much so make sure you make an area where the turtles might snap at them and make them drop there tail
 
maggie thecat
  • #30
Why not fancies and commons, I will was only going to get one species, but why?

My general understanding is that fancies are less vigourous, more fragile, and more likely to get outcompeted for food by larger, clumsy and more assertive common varieties. I know they have less tolerance for cold, which is why they have to be housed indoors in places that have cold winters.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
So the
I would look into tiny palms, like Howea species. The turtles and iguanas have diffrent needs but with a big enclosure you should be able to work it. I was actually going to do this a few years back but with Chinese water dragons. It was going to be a big wooden tank with half water and I was going to try to Incorperated an ecosystem, like hiding spots, plants, caves, and etc for guppises and fish like that, and turtles that could occasionally eat them and live on them while not eating them all, so an endless food source, theoretically. I also thought about little finches but there noisy. Then I was thinking about other lizards. The only reason I didn’t do this project was space. With enough equipment you can make anything out of a tank. Has iguanas get older they won’t move has much so make sure you make an area where the turtles might snap at them and make them drop there tail
turtles will possibly attack my iguanas?

My general understanding is that fancies are less vigourous, more fragile, and more likely to get outcompeted for food by larger, clumsy and more assertive common varieties. I know they have less tolerance for cold, which is why they have to be housed indoors in places that have cold winters.
Thanks, so which would you personally get, I will probably get the biggest ones the store has, but which do you prefer?

My general understanding is that fancies are less vigourous, more fragile, and more likely to get outcompeted for food by larger, clumsy and more assertive common varieties. I know they have less tolerance for cold, which is why they have to be housed indoors in places that have cold winters.
Thanks, it will be heavily planted, what type of fish do you recommend, that will reproduce a lot and the golds will eat the small one? I am going for a simi-self sustaining ecosystem.
 
maggie thecat
  • #32
My pond is stocked with feeder goldfish and shubunkins, because I wanted colorful and pretty, and my fish stay in their pond year round. I also have some Rosy Red Minnows.

Last year the goldfish bred, or crossbred, more accurately. Most of the fry were eaten by various frogs, and possibly the rosies, but a handful survived.

The babies are either calico or natural color and currently thinking about turning orange.

They have spawned again this year on a planter that I moved due to a late frost. Because my pond is close to capacity , I suspect that in a few months, I am going to have fish to swap for credit at my lfs, not from my main pond, but from my plant nursery pond.

It occurred to me the other week, that the reason my local pond supply sells bullfrog tadpoles is because they're carniverous and probably help keep pond populations down. So in stocking your pond, you may want to consider a few frogs to help keep numbers in check.
 
MD_Plants
  • #33
If the iguana bothers him, the turtle could bite back. He’s not going to kill him but it won’t be the most pleasant thing.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #34
No,
My pond is stocked with feeder goldfish and shubunkins, because I wanted colorful and pretty, and my fish stay in their pond year round. I also have some Rosy Red Minnows.

Last year the goldfish bred, or crossbred, more accurately. Most of the fry were eaten by various frogs, and possibly the rosies, but a handful survived.

The babies are either calico or natural color and currently thinking about turning orange.

They have spawned again this year on a planter that I moved due to a late frost. Because my pond is close to capacity , I suspect that in a few months, I am going to have fish to swap for credit at my lfs, not from my main pond, but from my plant nursery pond.

It occurred to me the other week, that the reason my local pond supply sells bullfrog tadpoles is because they're carniverous and probably help keep pond populations down. So in stocking your pond, you may want to consider a few frogs to help keep numbers in check.
I want something that will reproduce a lot, so the golds will have some nice tasty fry every once in a while, so it will be kind of selfs sustaing, so my iguanas will eat plants, golds will eat smaller fish fry, smaller fish will eat lettuce that falls in and flys and stuff.

If the iguana bothers him, the turtle could bite back. He’s not going to kill him but it won’t be the most pleasant thing.
So I’ll probably just put gold fish in don’t want to risk any thing.
 
wodesorel
  • #35
I call my turtles my idiots because they go after anything that moves thinking it is food. A skinny tail would be an awesome snack to them. I personally would not recommend it.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #36
Could I put bamboo in with the iguanas?
 
MD_Plants
  • #37
What type of bamboo? Lucky bamboo, which is a grass, could work if you can get enough light and proper soil drainage. Or real bamboo, which can get pretty big and spread to much. If I was doing it I would get fake bamboo just so I don’t have to worry about fertilizer and stuff.
 
maggie thecat
  • #38
Granted, my pond is out of doors, but after a couple of months, I didn't really need to feed it, unless I wanted to interact with the fish.

Take that back. Goldfish like duckweed and it's good for them, so I fed the excess from my betta tanks on a regular basis. Occassionally I did the same with anacharis, from other aquaria, because they eat that as well. But they don't swim up to visit for a cup of duckweed.

Anyway, between midges breeding bloodworms and mosquitos laying their eggs, plus fry, there was plenty of protein. After the pond was established, there was algae too.

Whether you can get that level of self sustaining activity going is sort of a question, but you can try. You might want to experiment with introducing shrimp and snails, once it is well established. If you do shrimp, I would make sure they have plenty of hides and plants of their own.

I had some in a minnow tank once, and they were hunted pretty aggressively , but they also managed to reproduce.

Take way from that: don't use anything expensive.

On the snail end of things, Japanese trapdoor snails are what you are looking for. They are workhouses for pond maintenance. You might not see a lot of them, mine are pretty reclusive. Although, before I changed my filtration system I could generally count on finding a few inside the unit. Now, they seem to spend their days in corners and crevices of the pond liner, coming out to feed at night.

You may also want to introduce ramshorns and bladder snails. They may become a food souce. They can help to make a more diverse environment .

I'm not sure that an indoor pond can be as self sustaining as an outdoor one, but you can try. Maybe corral off a section to farm duckweed.

They make floating rings covered with netting. I got one this year from Dr Foster and Smith to protect my water hyacinth (goldfish love the roots and kill the plants). Despite my initial reservation (it's not all that deep) It's working out great. The plants are thriving and the fish have a nice shady spot to hang out under.

You could farm duckweed in it. And feed it periodically.
 
AJE
  • Thread Starter
  • #39
Granted, my pond is out of doors, but after a couple of months, I didn't really need to feed it, unless I wanted to interact with the fish.

Take that back. Goldfish like duckweed and it's good for them, so I fed the excess from my betta tanks on a regular basis. Occassionally I did the same with anacharis, from other aquaria, because they eat that as well. But they don't swim up to visit for a cup of duckweed.

Anyway, between midges breeding bloodworms and mosquitos laying their eggs, plus fry, there was plenty of protein. After the pond was established, there was algae too.

Whether you can get that level of self sustaining activity going is sort of a question, but you can try. You might want to experiment with introducing shrimp and snails, once it is well established. If you do shrimp, I would make sure they have plenty of hides and plants of their own.

I had some in a minnow tank once, and they were hunted pretty aggressively , but they also managed to reproduce.

Take way from that: don't use anything expensive.

On the snail end of things, Japanese trapdoor snails are what you are looking for. They are workhouses for pond maintenance. You might not see a lot of them, mine are pretty reclusive. Although, before I changed my filtration system I could generally count on finding a few inside the unit. Now, they seem to spend their days in corners and crevices of the pond liner, coming out to feed at night.

You may also want to introduce ramshorns and bladder snails. They may become a food souce. They can help to make a more diverse environment .

I'm not sure that an indoor pond can be as self sustaining as an outdoor one, but you can try. Maybe corral off a section to farm duckweed.

They make floating rings covered with netting. I got one this year from Dr Foster and Smith to protect my water hyacinth (goldfish love the roots and kill the plants). Despite my initial reservation (it's not all that deep) It's working out great. The plants are thriving and the fish have a nice shady spot to hang out under.

You could farm duckweed in it. And feed it periodically.
Would Appel sanails work, those are the only ones my pet store sells, I was thinking of putting shrimp in my aquarium any way so thanks.

What type of bamboo? Lucky bamboo, which is a grass, could work if you can get enough light and proper soil drainage. Or real bamboo, which can get pretty big and spread to much. If I was doing it I would get fake bamboo just so I don’t have to worry about fertilizer and stuff.
Probably real bamboo I want to put it in my minI pond, I can just cut it if it gets to big.
 
maggie thecat
  • #40
You can try them, sure. They eat the same foods goldfish do. They just may not function in the pond the same way a trapdoor snail might. Then again, they could, I never really tried them in a pond.
 

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