If you could only keep ONE fish, what would it be?

Mii

Member
If you could only keep ONE fish(or a group if they are social fish), and it can be ANY fish in the world, but you can't have ANY other fish, what would you choose? Also the tank, aquascaping materials, plants, food, and anything else to go with this fish are FREE. So are invertebrates if you want them. Also, your other fish you have right now won't die, and will go to a nice home that will take good care of them. Ans if you don't have the space for them, you get another room built for free for the tank. For me it would probably be some sort of gourami or cichlid as they just have really good personalities.
 

Quiche

Member
Good question! Hmm...I guess I'd keep my axolotls, but they're technically amphibians. If I had to choose a fish, perhaps the Sewellia Lineolata Hillstream Loach- I've never had them, but I think a waterfall/fast-flowing river biotype would be a cool project! Or maybe some sort of seahorse, though I've always been intimidated by saltwater.
 

Schnauzergal

Member

aresbettafish

Member
I would hands down keep betta females and or males because of their beauty and easy care. and the tank would be a 10 gallon for a sorority vibe with lots of java ferns and beta bulbs. and for tank mates ghost shrimp and guppies.
 

Bettybrown922

Member
Goldfish. Of all types of fish I've owned, I found them to be the most enjoyable, calming and chock full of personality.
 

Cowardlyslimeball

Member
Hmm that's a very hard question.. I'd have to say a piranha because that's just hardcore and insanely cool.. they're really ugly but still. Just so cool, right?
 

AggressiveAquatics

Member
I’d keep my flowerhorns I can’t get rid of my doggies
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
AggressiveAquatics said:
I’d keep my flowerhorns I can’t get rid of my doggies
like I said, cichlids have great personalities, so much so that people describe them as "doggies"
 

veggieshark

Member
It would have to be a single big fish that I can hand feed, like a gar or a pike.
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
veggieshark in your aquarium details it says that "I don't test water, because all you can do realistically is water change, which I should be doing anyway.", but if you don't test, you don't know when you need water changes, a cycle crash, resulting in a massive ammonia spike could happen right under your nose and you might not even know until things start dying. this just seems like a risky way to go about fish keeping, as I always like to know as much about what's going on in my tanks as possible.
 

veggieshark

Member
If you do things right, you won't have anything like that. I have tanks that have been running for decades.
"When you need to do water changes" --> Every week, as much water as you can change. If something that fouls the water (overfeeding, live food, etc), you know you have to do an immediate water change. If this doesn't work, what are you going to do? Treat with chemicals?
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
veggieshark said:
If you do things right, you won't have anything like that. I have tanks that have been running for decades.
"When you need to do water changes" --> Every week, as much water as you can change. If something that fouls the water (overfeeding, live food, etc), you know you have to do an immediate water change. If this doesn't work, what are you going to do? Treat with chemicals?
sometimes things may foul the water without you knowing though
 

fishnovice33

Member
Only one fish...would have to go with a Goldfish.

Ironically I don’t have nor want any in my tanks. They’re dirty, eat everything in sight, and are a dang bull in a China shop when it comes to my aquascaping, soil, and plants.

But if I could only have one, no denying their great personalities and intelligence...Goldfish would be it.

Very strange how appealing they become if I could only have one fish...yet won’t ever get one since I can have other fish.
 

Nickguy5467

Member
googled and found this. thing's dope, ill take it

edit: awe, they took my fish away
 

Zach72202

Member
I would have to choose a puffer myself and honestly I would enjoy having many Tetraodon schoutedeni, or the spotted congo puffer. They are fairly peaceful and can be kept in groups. Just the thought of 100 little faces bumping the glass everytime I come near seems very appealing.

If I couldn't do that, I would do like 1,000 amazon puffers in a blackwater river biotope. Something about schooling puffers sounds mesmerizing.
 

veggieshark

Member
Mii said:
sometimes things may foul the water without you knowing though
OK, how often do you test your water? And what do you do if you find an ammonia spike? You do cleaning and a water change, right?

If you have an established tank and you don't mess with it all the time (like moving fish in and out), you do regular water changes, vacuum cleaning and pay attention to decaying plants and dead animals, something very unusual has to happen for the tank to go south. Unless the city messes with the tap water, the things that foul the water are organic stuff like fish poop, excess food, deteriorating plants or a dead fish that you didn't notice. All these things require removal of the deteriorating material and change of water. If you do the regular maintenance, you are automatically doing the treatment that you would do after a test.

Testing has its place. When you first establish your water source to understand your tap water parameters, or something starts to go bad despite your good maintenance, or when you are trying to help someone and you don't know anything about their water. Otherwise, I don't believe in constant testing of water.

I am not talking about changing the hardness or acidity of water, I don't want to mess with that. I don't keep fish that can't live in my tap water and require chemical manipulation of water. Natural things like driftwood, oak leaves already go in the tanks that have tetras, etc., and mineral-rich substrate/rocks in african cichlid tanks. That is the extent of my manipulation of water parameters.
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
veggieshark said:
OK, how often do you test your water? And what do you do if you find an ammonia spike? You do cleaning and a water change, right?

If you have an established tank and you don't mess with it all the time (like moving fish in and out), you do regular water changes, vacuum cleaning and pay attention to decaying plants and dead animals, something very unusual has to happen for the tank to go south. Unless the city messes with the tap water, the things that foul the water are organic stuff like fish poop, excess food, deteriorating plants or a dead fish that you didn't notice. All these things require removal of the deteriorating material and change of water. If you do the regular maintenance, you are automatically doing the treatment that you would do after a test.

Testing has its place. When you first establish your water source to understand your tap water parameters, or something starts to go bad despite your good maintenance, or when you are trying to help someone and you don't know anything about their water. Otherwise, I don't believe in constant testing of water.

I am not talking about changing the hardness or acidity of water, I don't want to mess with that. I don't keep fish that can't live in my tap water and require chemical manipulation of water. Natural things like driftwood, oak leaves already go in the tanks that have tetras, etc., and mineral-rich substrate/rocks in african cichlid tanks. That is the extent of my manipulation of water parameters.
To me I feel like keeping fish without testing, you're sort of flying blind and hoping things will be the way you think they are.
 

Lebeeze

Member
My fish would be a Male Dovii. I have wanted one for awhile now but don't have the room to get a tank that size.

Ps. To the people criticizing others for not testing water...

This thread has nothing to do about water testing and if he/she has been keeping tanks for 20 years they probably are doing something right!

Nickguy5467 said:
googled and found this. thing's dope, ill take it

edit: awe, they took my fish away
I want to know what the fish was lol
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
It would be hard to pick between a Group of Three Spot, Samurai or Paradise Gourami but I’d likely go for the Three Spots
 

PerfectSatyr683

Member
I would probably go for a oscar. But sadly I will never get one in real life.
 

Animefishes

Member
Prob a pregnant flowerhorn so that I can beat the system (or bettas)
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Mii said:
I see you're also a gourami person.
Very much so
So far I've kept: Snakeskins, Three Spots, Pearls, Moonlights, Dwarf, Thick Lipped, Honey, Banded, Sparkling, Paradise, Black Paradise, Dayi, Cupanus, Eye Spot, Licorice and Samurai. I also met my partner through keeping Gourami
 

Skrabbitskrabbit

Member
Cowardlyslimeball said:
Hmm that's a very hard question.. I'd have to say a piranha because that's just hardcore and insanely cool.. they're really ugly but still. Just so cool, right?
Piranhas would be socool. That way you can threaten to feed your house guests to your pets *evil laugh*
I have never kept them but I like the idea
 

NoahLikesFish

Member
Koi’s Or Arowana Or puffers or a gigantic school of fish that would follow my hand (mabye altum or puffers or bucktooth tetra)
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
jinjerJOSH22 said:
Very much so
So far I've kept: Snakeskins, Three Spots, Pearls, Moonlights, Dwarf, Thick Lipped, Honey, Banded, Sparkling, Paradise, Black Paradise, Dayi, Cupanus, Eye Spot, Licorice and Samurai. I also met my partner through keeping Gourami
I wish I had that many gouramis. What is the reason you'd choose 3 spot over the others?
 

NoahLikesFish

Member
Idk they have personality
 

emeraldking

Member
In my case it would be Micropoecilia picta. Just because it's my favorite!
 
  • Thread Starter

Mii

Member
emeraldking said:
In my case it would be Micropoecilia picta. Just because it's my favorite!
That looks alot like an endler.
 

erinw347

Member
It would have to be either my angels or my BN pleco. My angels are so personable, with their little begging faces. But my BN is such a handsome young boy!! and he’s VERY cute.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Mii said:
I wish I had that many gouramis. What is the reason you'd choose 3 spot over the others?
Hmmmn it's hard to really say, maybe because it was my first but there's something about them just gets me. They grow to a decent size but not too big, have lovely colouring, display such moody behavior. It's hard to really put my finger on it though.
 

SnookusFish

Member
Mine would just be a small schooling fish, tetra or rasbora. If i can't have a community tank then ill just concentrate on the best aquascape and the schooling fish will just complement the scape. Like 1000 chili rasboras in a 300g aquascape would look epic
 

JustAFishServant

Member
Bettas, without a doubt! Although that would be really hard to choose which one...You might've seen a story about Fig, so maybe him! Although I also LOVE Grump's deep coloration, Starfruit's stunning gold, and Banana's silly personality! I usually prefer females and am actually planning on getting a young girl pretty soon, so we'll see! That would be a hard choice, especially since I'm currently working on downsizing 13 Bettas...
 

Donovan Jones

Member
This is a tough one. My top few would be paradise fish, cpd, heterandria formosa, and elassoma. I think I'd go with elassoma. They're gorgeous and breed easy amd since they'd be my only fish live food would be easy.
 

Delcos

Member
jinjerJOSH22 said:
Very much so
So far I've kept: Snakeskins, Three Spots, Pearls, Moonlights, Dwarf, Thick Lipped, Honey, Banded, Sparkling, Paradise, Black Paradise, Dayi, Cupanus, Eye Spot, Licorice and Samurai. I also met my partner through keeping Gourami
I love samurai but I can find barely any info on them. Are they difficult to keep?
 

Leeman75

Member
Ooh...so hard. Would definitely have to be a cichlid! My normal go-to favorite fish overall is a Keyhole (I'm sure people are sick of hearing me say that!), but there is so much that I get from their behavior in a group and with other fish, that I may have to not go with them.

In that case, I'm thinking German Blue Ram.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Delcos said:
I love samurai but I can find barely any info on them. Are they difficult to keep?
I wish I could give you a good answer but we've only had them for about 2 weeks.
One thing that I often see though is they're easier to keep than Chocolate Gourami, they don't seem as needy as people claim with Chocolates, so far ours have accepted flakes without issue and seem to be doing well.
We're keeping them in a slightly tanned water that's somewhat soft(nowhere near as soft as what is usually recommended).
I wish I could give you more info
 

Luluwwwwww

Member
MBU puffer. I follow a MBU on instagram and I just have to watch that silly puppy face everyday! The reaction when he sees food is just priceless.
Probably won't ever keep one IRL tho I don't think I can handle water change for 300+gallon tank, unless I win the lottery and get some sort of automated water changing system.
 

RandomFishBoi

Member
I would probably pick one of the gar-like fish. Ctenolucius spp. - Belonesox belizanus -- Xenentodon cancila - Boulengerella spp. Or maybe even one of the large gar like the spotted gar or alligator gar.
 

CHJ

Member
Hmm.
If the fish is guaranteed to live and the food is free I'd say Great White shark (world first!) or blue whale because a several cubic mile aquarium would be awesome.
Arapiama for the aquarium.
Australian lungfish would be cool.
Coelacanth for the freak show factor.
A group.. can I consider cross river puffers to be social?
If it can be something extinct, a mosasaurus (free food again assumed).

Luluwwwwww said:
MBU puffer. I follow a MBU on instagram and I just have to watch that silly puppy face everyday! The reaction when he sees food is just priceless.
Here you go. Nibbles hopes you have a shrimp.
 

RandomFishBoi

Member
CHJ said:
Hmm.
If the fish is guaranteed to live and the food is free I'd say Great White shark (world first!) or blue whale because a several cubic mile aquarium would be awesome.
Arapiama for the aquarium.
Australian lungfish would be cool.
Coelacanth for the freak show factor.
A group.. can I consider cross river puffers to be social?
If it can be something extinct, a mosasaurus (free food again assumed).
Well the Blue Whale is a mammal and the Mosasaurus is a Reptile, but still cool ideas. Didn't think about going that big and advanced. I would want a fish I can interact with. Maybe blue whale but definitely can't interact with a Mosasaurus lol.
 

MomOfLiveBearers

Member
Def my eel. I love all my fish but my eel has a huge personality and loves feeding time. I hand feed him and honestly it would be easier to feed him without all the riff raff stealing his food from my hand
 

CHJ

Member
RandomFishBoi said:
Well the Blue Whale is a mammal and the Mosasaurus is a Reptile, but still cool ideas. Didn't think about going that big and advanced. I would want a fish I can interact with. Maybe blue whale but definitely can't interact with a Mosasaurus lol.
You can interact with the Mosasaurus watch him swim happily back and forth against the glass when he sees you have brought him bison. You do have to remember to hold the bison with tongs when feeding the Mosasaurus though.
 

RandomFishBoi

Member
CHJ said:
You do have to remember to hold the bison with tongs when feeding the Mosasaurus though.
Yes, because otherwise it would be dangerous.
 

veggieshark

Member
Mii said:
To me I feel like keeping fish without testing, you're sort of flying blind and hoping things will be the way you think they are.
To me, testing for nitrogen products in an established fish tank is like getting online and looking at the weather channel to see if it is raining outside, while you could look out the window and see it for yourself, and all you will do is to get your raincoat on your way out which you would do anyway.

Thank you for the opportunity to vocalize my view on this subject. (I was expecting sooner or later somebody would question it I am sure everyone has a different way of doing things. Maybe testing regularly determines your water change schedule, or gives you a peace of mind. If that's how things work best for you, then it is great.

Having written all this, I am now really curious about how you actually do this. I will be grateful if you outline your routine maintenance involving water testing. Maybe I am missing something here.

Mine is like, every weekend:
- Drain about 60% of water while vacuuming gravel (or bare bottom).
- Brush off algae from front glass if necessary (leave the back glass alone)
- Gently squeeze out excess dirt from filter sponges in the old water and put back. (every 3-4 weeks change carbon if used, brush the filter outlets)
- Replace water (use hand as temperature sensor, no measuring) treated with conditioner.
- Wait for things to settle a little - restart filter.
- Don't feed immediately afterwards.

Other times, If you find dead fish or uneaten (especially meaty) food, remove them and do the above water change. Meebe treat with a slime coat support thing.

That's about it. Where does your testing and actions based on the result come in picture in your routine?
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
veggieshark said:
To me, testing for nitrogen products in an established fish tank is like getting online and looking at the weather channel to see if it is raining outside, while you could look out the window and see it for yourself, and all you will do is to get your raincoat on your way out which you would do anyway.

Thank you for the opportunity to vocalize my view on this subject. (I was expecting sooner or later somebody would question it I am sure everyone has a different way of doing things. Maybe testing regularly determines your water change schedule, or gives you a peace of mind. If that's how things work best for you, then it is great.

Having written all this, I am now really curious about how you actually do this. I will be grateful if you outline your routine maintenance involving water testing. Maybe I am missing something here.

Mine is like, every weekend:
- Drain about 60% of water while vacuuming gravel (or bare bottom).
- Brush off algae from front glass if necessary (leave the back glass alone)
- Gently squeeze out excess dirt from filter sponges in the old water and put back. (every 3-4 weeks change carbon if used, brush the filter outlets)
- Replace water (use hand as temperature sensor, no measuring) treated with conditioner.
- Wait for things to settle a little - restart filter.
- Don't feed immediately afterwards.

Other times, If you find dead fish or uneaten (especially meaty) food, remove them and do the above water change. Meebe treat with a slime coat support thing.

That's about it. Where does your testing and actions based on the result come in picture in your routine?
I am not known to be a frequent water tester, either. My current test kit still has the seal on it lol!
So you aren't alone.

I think it would be quite awesome to have an aquarium with either a nurse shark in it or one of the sand sharks we used to catch by the beaches. Or maybe a couple of horseshoe crabs. Those things are so odd looking!
 

veggieshark

Member
I haven't thought about saltwater. I have no idea how to look after one, some kind of octopus might be a good one for me as a single pet.
 

FinalFins

Member
Id say wild discus or leopoldi angelfish. Wouldnt mind having lots of gourami either.
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
veggieshark said:
I haven't thought about saltwater. I have no idea how to look after one, some kind of octopus might be a good one for me as a single pet.
I have no clue either, but i have been absolutely fascinated with sharks at least since i learned to read.
 

Most photos, videos and links are disabled if you are not logged in.

Log in or register to view

Top Bottom