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Smokey3737

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Can anyone ID this plant? I found it in Lake Tahoe, literally. It's really pretty and thankfully not growing too fast. I quarantined it in Rid-Ich solution for a few days before adding it to my tank.
20190812_201612.jpg
 

Cognac82

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A quick search of that plant led me to find information about an aquatic moth that they use to control the spread of it. And now my mind is completely blown, because I didn't know there were any moths that swim. So now I'm certainly going to have weird dreams tonight. Thanks!
 

MissNoodle

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Its a gorgeous plant, but very very invasive. Unfortunately you may wanna toss it. Put it in a bag, let it dry, then throw it out. It spreads super easy and its so hard to get rid of.

But, at the end of the day its up to you. Its not illegal to have in *most* places (check your local laws) but it is encouraged to be destroyed if you find it.
 

HoneybeeJenni

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I think it's fine to have an invasive plant in your tank (if it isn't going to take it over, your tank conditions being different than Lake Tahoe's) but make sure it never leaves your house alive. :emoji_smiling_imp: haha
 

MissNoodle

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I think it's fine to have an invasive plant in your tank (if it isn't going to take it over, your tank conditions being different than Lake Tahoe's) but make sure it never leaves your house alive. :emoji_smiling_imp: haha
However, think water changes. If leaves or debris from this plant is in the waste water and is disposed of through drains or even through garbage disposal while alive, it spreads. This plant spreads through breaking. A leaf or stem piece is enough for it to spread and take over again. This is why its so hard to get rid of it where it has established itself as an escaped aquarium plant in lakes.

This plant is actually dangerous to ecosystems due to how easily it spreads and how easily it grows. When this plant dies off, it kills all of the oxygen in the water ways and kills mass populations of native fish. Not only that but it drowns out other plants in the area as well.

Its not worth the risk. All it takes is one tiny piece inside the waste water from water changes to end up causing millions in damage.


Plus.

If it dying off can deplete lakes of oxygen and their fish, what would happen should it die off in an aquarium which is a lot smaller and more limited on oxygen as it is?

Eurasian watermilfoil: Quebec urged to help fight the 'zombie plant'
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/zombie-plant-threatening-ontario-lakes-1.4752264
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/zombie-plant-quebec-investment-1.4751909

Food for thought.
 
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Smokey3737

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Thanks for all the info and ID everyone! Wow, I didn't think it could possibly be any worse than the Hornwort and Pennywort in my tank. There was tons of Hornwort in the lake too. I only found this one fragment of Watermilfoil.

I'm on the fence. I like having some aggressive plants in the tank because they're always fresh and healthy and green no matter what. It makes up for my lackluster a.reneckii and r.wasilli I need a better light.

Whether I keep it or not, I always compost/ destroy my discarded plant material. It never sees water again once it leaves my tank. I've been doing this since I found out that it's illegal for me to buy Fanwort here in California. I started thinking that the other "worts" in my tank could be just as bad.

I'd hate to be the person who brought Watermilfoil to Lake Tahoe, yikes!
 

Cognac82

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It also apparently hybridizes with the native milfoil plant and causes that combo to spread crazily, too.
Reading about it, they have to remove it by hand because other methods have failed. It outcompetes native plants for space and reduces hunting area for adult fish and alters the nurseries for the native fry, and it keeps plants below it from photosynthesizing. Additionally, it secretes a chemical to kill blue green algae around it. Very interesting plant, very bad to have outside its native range.
Also, the swimming moths thing is really still poking me in the "Whoa, that's weird!" part of my brain.
 

MissNoodle

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Yikes :emoji_grimacing: Actually forget any of that, BURN IT! NoodleKeeper is right 100% NOT worth the risk.
If it werent as damaging, id have agreed 100% about keeping it, but this particular plant is really bad. Otherwise, an invasive/non native plant is fine in a tank. But this one is on a whole other level
 
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