ick? help

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ab

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I recently added neon tetras to my established tank. Water tested good. All the neons died with in a short time and the rest of my fish have white spots mostly on the fins, however, it doesn't look like salt to me. I did a water change today. Tank is 35 gal. Do I need to medicate or will frequent water changes help? Can it be something other then ick? Help is appreciated. Thanks
 

Gwenz

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How old is the tank?
Is it cycled? If it isn't then that could be a reason why your neons died.
White spots is probably ich, and from what I've heard I think it's caused by water temp being too low. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong :-\ ). What temp is your tank?

You might need to medicate, but not sure. Someone else might be able to help you, but you could raise the temp of the tank to 82' F. That should help.

Gwenz
 
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ab

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My tank is 36 gal, it's bben set up since Aug. many of the fish were in my 20 gal tank prior to upgrading to the 36 gal. My water tested good. My ph runs slightly high because the city water runs high, I have drift wood in the take to help maintain the ph. the current stock is:
Black Skirted tetra (6)
Sepia tetra (3)
marble hatchet (2)
cory cat (2)
I had just added Neons, They all died, and the rest of my fish now have what appears to be ick. I would like a non medicine treatment if possible (I heard something about salt) and is the store that sold me the ick at all resposible?
I started this in beginners but I will also try to post it in the medical advice area as well. Please help I understand this may be fatal to my fish.
Thanks
 

Mollygurl

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Hi ab! I have a 10 gallon tank w/ mollies and a pleco.a couple of weeks ago, both of my adult mollies had ick. i was told to raise the temp and add salt. I went home, raised the temperature to 80F and added 2 teaspoons of aquarium salt.My mollies were cured within a few days.make sure that u use aquarium salt, not table salt!!!!! Hope this helped!
 
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ab

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More info. I called the store where I purchased the neons. The stores fish had ick. The store refunded my purchase price and gave me Mardel Maracide (at no cost) to treat the ick. I began the treatment today. I now have a new set of questions. Is this med safe for my fish, esp the other tetras? should I still increase the temp? Should I still add salt? Once I finish the treatment is the ick completely gone or does it remain in a latent state ready to wreak havoc at some future time?
Thank you for helping me and my fishettes
 

atmmachine816

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If you raise the temperature to 82 for 15 days I think (butterfly or chickadee will be by to comfirm for me) it should remove the ich. If you haven't added the meds yet don't.
 

chickadee

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Almost...it is 85 degrees Fahrenheit or 30 degrees Celsius and for 14 days.   If the water needs changed it is a good idea to check the temperature with a thermometer to be sure you will not be cooling down the tank.  They also need to have an airstone running at this temperature (not a bad idea at all times) as the natural oxygen level in the water will decrease with the raise in temperature.  Hotter water cannot hold the same amount of oxygen and the fish can become oxygen starved.  If you treat ich with this temperature for the whole time, you should not need added medications.
ALL fish tanks basically carry the parasite dormant but conditions have to be right for it to attack the fish. Keeping a clean and fresh tank and feeding your fish well but not overfeeding, just good fish care will decrease the chances of it reoccurring.

Rose
 
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