IBC Standards: 2009-2010

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I always have a hard time finding these so I thought I'd throw them up here for everyone.
All of these are from the Betta4all forum, I don't know anywhere else to find them but if someone has like an IBC handbook or something I'd appreciate them going over these and double checking that they're correct. (Though I'm actually very confident in they're accuracy.)

EDIT: Study break is pretty much up I'll be back in a few hours to continue. Please let me know if I should or not. Thank-you.
 
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Chapter 5: General Standards prt.1

IBC Standards - Chapter 5: General Standards effective 15/07/2009



THE IDEAL SHOW BETTA

ideal show Betta is in excellent health as shown by its faultless condition and vigorous deportment. The body and fins are unblemished. There are no body scars, spots, and missing or misshapen scales. Fin rays are straight or smoothly curved. Fins are held rigidly erect and gills are fully flared. Movement is continuous and aggressive with violent response to any intruder. The ideal show Betta presents nearly mirror-image symmetry above and below an imaginary mid-lateral line. This Betta is well proportioned with respect to fins and body size. The body is smoothly tapered toward the caudal peduncle. The dorsal fin approaches the analfin in shape, width, and size. There is a 180-degree spread between first and last caudal rays. The outer margins of the dorsal, caudal and analfins trace a continuous circular contour with no gaps between fins. Fins are broad and overlap at the edges. Secondary and tertiary divisions occur at even intervals along the lengths of fin rays. The ideal show Betta exhibits brilliant coloration of uniform density. In solid color classes there are no off-color washes in the fins and no blotching or speckling of unwanted colors on the body. Patterned types have dark and bright colors in shades that produce the highest contrast. The overall appearance of color on this Betta is one of vivid, sparkling beauty.

GENERAL STANDARDS
These standards cover the traits that Bettas share in common. The General Standards are judging guidelines that emphasize health and development of the physical traits of the Betta.

The Judging Areas
In this section are the details of the General Standards judging areas of Dimension, Condition, Deportment, and Finnage.

The Components
Each Rating Area may have listed sub-areas to be evaluated called the Components.

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS

1) DIMENSION 2) CONDITION 3) DEPORTMENT
a) Size
1) Body
2) Fins
3) Overall
b) Symmetry
c) Proportion
d) Shape
1) Body
2) Fins
3) Overall

FINNAGE CHARACTERISTICS
(Size; Symmetry; Proportion; Shape)
Dorsal Caudal Anal Ventrals & Pectorals

For reference, a diagrammed photo of general Betta anatomy is provided, since these standards use some terms for parts of a betta with which judges must become familiar.



DIMENSION

BODY SIZE
Body size of males must be at least one and a half inches (1.5”) long. Body size of Females must be at least one and a quarter inches (1.25”)
long. (See Wild Types descriptions for size requirements in those species.) Betta splendens that do not conform to these minimum sizes must be disqualified. Body size should be the last consideration when judging for the best fish in a class. All other things being equal (same number of faults deduction points), the larger fish should win.

FIN SIZES
The following fin sizes apply to male Betta splendens classes. Although the following describe fin length, judges and exhibitors must keep in mind that fins judging emphasis must be on their breadth and volume.

Dorsal Fin
Must be at least one-half the length of the body, measured from the base of the center fin ray to the outer tip of the same ray.

Caudal Fin
Must be at least one half of the length of the body as measured from the caudal peduncle to the center of the outer edge - not to the edge of the greatest extension.

analfin
Must be at least one half of the length of the body measured from the base of the center fin ray to the outer tip of the center fin ray.

Ventral Fin
Length should be close to the length of the analfin.

Pectoral Fin
Pectoral size is difficult to evaluate, especially if they are transparent. However, in general large full pectorals are desired.

SYMMETRY
The ideal Betta should be balanced with both body and fins defining smooth and continuous contours. The body should be nearly symmetrical above and below an imaginary midlateral line, excepting the region forward of the analfin where body organs are housed. The silhouette of the three non-paired fins should be as close to a circle as possible with the outer margins of these fins tracing a continuous circular outline without gaps. In doubletail Bettas, the Judge should expect to see, as a norm, a higher degree of symmetry than shown by the singletail Bettas. The unpaired fins should display mirror-image symmetry above and below an imaginary mid-lateral line. This is due to the doubletail’s broader dorsal fin that can approach the breadth, volume and shape of the analfin.

PROPORTION
A beautifully proportioned Betta is superior to one that is merely large. It is important that the fins and the body be in proportion to each other. If the fins are very large the body should be also. A disproportionately large (or small) unpaired fin detracts from the symmetry and overall beauty of the fish.

BODY SHAPE
The body should be a modified spindle shape that is somewhat heavier in the area of the ventral fins. It should taper cleanly toward the head and caudal fin with the tail junction, or peduncle, being thinner from side to side. It should be three to four times as long as it is “deep,” top to bottom. The overall form of a Betta is very important. The body and its form in particular have a significant impact on the overall appearance of the Betta. The body must complement the fin structure, not overwhelm it.
Example; a fat husky body with little finnage is a serious fault. Doubletail Bettas may have a deeper--top to bottom--body than singletailed Bettas. The thicker body is acceptable, as long as it contributes to the support of the larger finnage of doubledtails. (Form Variations, Plakats, and Wild Type entries will differ.)

FIN SHAPE

Dorsal Fin
Singletail Dorsal
A variety of shapes are acceptable – semicircle, quarter circle, rectangular - as long as breadth and volume are displayed. Triangular
shape is unacceptable. As with the other fins, width and fullness are important, with maximum fin area a goal. Ideally, the dorsal fin will overlap the caudal fin and appear blended with it, though not physically fused. The first rays (closer to the head) must be comparable in length to the other rays and should in no case be “stubby.”

Doubletail Dorsal
The base of the dorsal fin of a doubletail Betta is expected to be considerably broader than that found in the singletail. The doubletail dorsal is, ideally, the mirror image of the analfin in keeping with the concept of symmetry.

Caudal Fin
In singletail bettas, the ideal shape is a semicircle that spreads to a perfect 180 degrees. Due to proper selection of breeders, fin ray branching, care, conditioning, and fin spread this is an elusive ideal to breed for and maintain. Because of this, some classes will sometimes not have specimens with this ideal caudal among them. In such classes, with all other things equal, the most symmetrical types having the widest spread and those with the least faults as described in the general fault guide and the special standards will have the best chance of placing. Caudal fins that exceed 180° spread are not favored over fish displaying 180° spread. All caudals, including doubletail Bettas, should have rays evenly distributed above and below the centerline of the fish. Proportionate volume is ideal as opposed to length.
Note: for the Doubletail Caudal - the volume in the upper and lower caudal should be equal and equally distributed above and below the centerline. The two caudals may overlap but should be separated all the way to the caudal peduncle. A half circle is ideal for the overall shape of the two caudal
fins.

analfin
Shape to be roughly rectangular. The ideal shape of the analfin is an isosceles trapezoid with the shorter side at the base of the fin at the body. In other words, the outer edge of the fin should be broader than the base. Front and back edges should not converge to a point forming a triangle. Volume and fullness are desired. Ideally, the analfin overlaps, but does not fuse with, the caudal. Triangular shape in the analfin is a form fault as is excessively long (1.5 to 2 times the width) analfin. The analfin should not extend beyond the bottom edge of the caudal fin.)

Ventral Fins
Shaped somewhat like a knife blade with the cutting edge to the rear. The front edge is slightly convex. Tips are pointed. Fins should be of equal length and not crossed. They must match each other. These fins should not be excessively short, nor long and thin. Fullness is desireable. Female ventral fins generally appear shorter in proportion to the body.

Pectoral Fin
Pectoral fins are the most important in swimming, maintaining balance in the water, and rapid aggressive motion. Broad and long are preferred.

OVERALL SHAPE
Overall ideal appearance of a quality Betta splendens (single tail or double tail) is a full circle with no open spaces between the three
primary fins.



DOUBLETAIL BETTAS
Doubletail Bettas are expected to differ in several ways from the singletail:
1. Possess two distinct “tails” or caudal lobes instead of one, with a complete separation to the base of the caudal peduncle.
2. Possess a wider caudal peduncle to support the double lobes.
3. Possess a larger dorsal fin, nearly the size of the analfin.
4. Their bodies are usually more “chunky” and often a bit shorter.
5. Bends in the caudal peduncle are expressed to a varying degree in almost all doubletail bettas. These are more easily noticed when viewing the fish from above. Easily seen bends should be faulted; if the bend is not excessive when viewed from above, the fish should not be penalized.

FEMALE BETTAS
Female Bettas of all types are of the same general form as their male counterparts, but with shorter fins and broader bodies. IBC encourages
the maintenance of the distinctive female and male forms. Female Bettas vary considerably from males in several ways and should always appear "female."
1. Females are generally expected to be somewhat smaller overall. They are usually more rounded in the belly area than males.
2. Female fins are not expected to reach the same size or proportion of the male finnage. Female bettas should have broad voluminous fins, but not possess male finnage length.
3. Females are expected to show an egg spot.
4. Females may be less aggressive in their deportment.
5. The minimum size for show is 1 1/4 inches.
6. Females are judged with the same general and color standards as males.
7. Disqualify: Egg-bound or showing no egg spot: excessive male finnage.

FEMALE LONG-FINNED/HM Betta splendens Form and Finnage Faults
1. One unpaired fin longer than 1/3 of body length (minor fault).
2. Two unpaired fins longer than 1/3 of body length (major fault).
3. All 3 unpaired fins longer than 1/3 of body length (severe fault).
4. One unpaired fin 1/2 of body length or more (major fault).
5. Two unpaired fins 1/2 of body length or more (severe fault).
6. All 3 unpaired fins 1/2 of body length of more (disqualify).
7. Egg-bound (disqualify).
8. No visible egg-spot (disqualify).

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY



CONDITION

GENERAL CONDITION
“CONDITION” considers the health of the Betta and the degree of body/fin “damage” that contribute to the overall appearance of a Betta. The fish should appear to be well nourished, vigorous, and with healthy fin and body tissue. Age can cause a reduced quality condition, such as excessive body size and curled fin rays.

Body
Perfect in appearance is the key. ANY nicks in the flesh, missing scales, protruding scales or other defects of the body material are to be faulted.

Fins
Though there are two sets of paired fins --pectorals and ventrals -- and three unpaired fins -- dorsal, caudal, and anal -- certain aspects of development apply to all of the fins. Fin rays should be straight or slightly bent until they branch and grow parallel or fan out smoothly as they get farther from the base of the fin. Rays may extend beyond the webbing tissue -- called protruded or extended rays. If a fish exhibits extended rays, all fins should show extended rays, evenly spaced. Web tissue is to be full, strong, and undamaged. Margins should be smooth and unbroken except for fish showing extended rays. Fins should be carried erect with
rays and webbing spread uniformly and fully. Pinholes, uneven edges that indicate former damage, splits in fins and “blown fins” are all indicators of the condition of the fish, the care the fish has been given and stress exposure. These are all faults ranging from minor to disqualification.



Above illustration shows example of protruded or extended rays. This type of fin development should not count against the condition of the fish. Fringed is also known as combtail. Hyper-extended rays with less webbing than usual are known as crowntail and have their own standard.

DEPORTMENT
Good deportment, often thought of as flaring, is an important trait for Betta splendens because, not only does it indicate vigor, it also allows other features, such as color, to be shown off to advantage. Though of a relatively small value, poor deportment can have disastrous consequences for the other components of evaluation. Poor deportment often gives the impression that the Betta “doesn’t feel well”, or is frightened. Obviously the fish must be studied as a whole when considering deportment. Each body/fin part plays a role.
Caution: Wild type Bettas have considerably different deportment -- see descriptions. Other Betta species than splendens, particularly mouthbrooders, are frequently very nervous in bowls and consequently rarely flare. However, all fish regardless of species should appear alert with unclamped fins.
... article was to long....
 
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Chapter 5: General Standards prt.2

Article continued....


GENERAL FAULTS

DISQUALIFYING FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
1. Undersized (male 1.5" body length, female 1.25" body length).
2. Swimming difficulty (due to excess finnage or swim bladder disorder).
3. Class error (fish entered in wrong class).
A. Non-splendens type not labeled.
B. Color or form variation not labeled.
C. Wrong sex for class.
D. Wrong species for class.
E. Hybrids in non-splendens class.
4. “Egg spot” on male, or no “egg spot” on female.
5. Female with excessive (male) finnage.
6. Malformed body (especially in double tails).
7. Missing external anatomical part, such as an eye, gill cover, or fin.
8. Extreme scale faults: Excessive irregular scale pattern/multiple misalighned scales.
9. Any sign of disease or illness.
10. Blindness (especially in Opaques and Albinos).
11. Egg bound (severely distended abdomen).
12. Shy or fearful behavior – does not rise from bowl bottom.
13. Any evidence of tampering with the appearance of any show fish is a disqualifying fault.

HEAD FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
1. Disfigurement of the lips (slight fault).
2. Small bump, small groove, or other slight deformity (minor fault).
3. Large bump, large groove, or other large deformity (major fault).
4. Head tilted (usually upward) out of alinement with body (severe fault).

BODY FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
1. Body stout or slightly fat (slight fault).
2. Doubletail body too short or stout (slight fault).
3. Body moderately too small for finnage (minor fault).
4. Body does not show ideal shape – minor anomaly. (minor fault).
5. Body has one or two misaligned scales (minor fault).
6. Body has several misaligned scales (major fault).
7. Body is “fat” or “skinny” (major fault).
8. Gill covers protrude outward when closed (major fault).
9. Body shows slight swayback or humpback (major fault).
10. Doubletail caudal peduncle bump or bend very noticeable (major fault).
11. Body shows excessive swayback or humpback (severe fault).

FINNAGE FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
General – all fins
1. Projected rays on all fins, but some not even (minor fault).
2. One curled fin ray (minor fault).
3. Projected rays only on some fins (minor fault).
4. Outline of non-paired fins presents an oval rather than a circular shape. (minor fault) – does NOT apply to Plakats or females.
5. Gaps between the three unpaired fins - no overlapping (major fault).
6. Fins are too small for body (major fault).
7. Curled fin rays - more than one(major fault).
8. Fins not similar - some broad, some narrow (major fault).
9. Outline of non-paired fins presents a considerably non-symmetrical shape, such as a square, rectangular, or irregular shape. (major fault)

Ventral fins
1. Crossed ventrals (slight fault).
2. Thin ventrals (slight fault).
3 Extra long ventrals - except in Plakats (slight fault).
4. Noticeably short ventrals (minor fault).
5. Curled ventral(s) (minor fault).
6. Stubby ventrals (major fault).

Dorsal fin
1. A few short rays on front of dorsal, not matched on anal (slight fault).
2. Dorsal somewhat small in relation to anal and caudal (minor fault).
3. Singletail dorsal slightly narrow (minor fault).
4. Doubletail dorsal slightly more narrow than the anal (minor fault).
5. Doubletail dorsal has a few short rays at the front edge, not matched on anal (minor fault).
6. Singletail dorsal noticeably narrow (major fault).
7. Doubletail dorsal much more narrow than the anal (major fault).
8. Dorsal very small in relation to anal and caudal (major fault).

analfin
1. Long analfin drops below bottom edge of caudal (minor fault)
2. A few front rays curled forward (minor fault).
3. Excessive rounding at front and bottom of analfin approaching a “quarter circle” (major fault).
4. Front rays have severe forward curling at front (major fault).
5. Triangular shaped (severe fault).

Caudal (tail) fin
1. Caudal edges straight but slightly rounded at the corners (slight fault).
2. Doubletail lobes are full, but separation not quite complete – separation still greater than 3/4 (slight fault).
3. Caudal asymmetrical - droops slightly below midline (minor fault).
4. Doubletail lobes slight mismatch (minor fault).
5. First caudal edge rays short (minor fault).
6. Caudal slightly small - not proportional to dorsal and anal (minor fault).
7. Caudal edges not straight, slightly curved back away from head (minor fault).
8. Less than secondary branching (4 tips from primary ray) in females, or tertiary branching (8 tips from primary ray) in males (minor fault).
9. Less than 180 degrees between caudal edge rays, but more than 165 degrees (minor fault).
10. Doubletail caudal lobes separation between 1/2 and 3/4 (minor fault).
11. Caudal asymmetrical - droops 75% or more below midline (major fault).
12. Caudal very small - not proportional to dorsal and anal (major fault).
13. Doubletail lobes considerable mismatch in volume or shape (major fault).
14. Doubletail caudal lobes matched, but narrow (major fault).
15. Less than primary branching (2 tips from primary ray) in females, or secondary branching (4 tips from primary ray) in males (major fault).
16. Doubletail caudal lobes separation 1/2 or less (major fault).
17. Less than 165 degrees between caudal edge rays, but more than 150 degrees (major fault).
18. Doubletail caudal lobes mismatched and narrow (severe fault).
19. Non-symmetrical caudal type (severe fault).
20. Less than 150 degrees between caudal edge rays (severe fault).

CONDITION FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
1. Single small defect on any fin - pinhole or bent ray (slight fault).
2. Single moderate defect on any fin (minor fault).
3. Slightly frayed fin tip (minor fault).
4. Multiple small defects or single extensive defect (major fault).
5. Multiple moderate defects (severe fault).
6. Broken rays on any fin (severe fault).
7. Body scarred or missing scales (major fault).

DEPORTMENT FAULTS – ALL CLASSES
1. Constant full display (Betta splendens), but exhibits only aggressive (not violent) response to intruder (slight fault).
2. Fins erect, but gills only occasionally flared, and exhibits only motion toward intruder (minor fault).
3. Fins occasionally erect, gills rarely flared, and not very responsive to intruder (major fault).
4. No display and unresponsive to intruder (severe fault).



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Chapter 5: Addendum CT Standard

Meh one more

IBC Standards - Chapter 5: Addendum CT Standard



Description: Crowntails are a type of “fringe-finned” domestic betta (Betta splendens, B. imbellis, B. smaragdina and any of their hybrids) having fin rays that extend significantly beyond the webbed portion of the fins. The supporting webbing around the fin rays is reduced and the rays protrude past the edges of the fin membrane. The result is a scalloped appearance or the appearance of hyper-extended rays as seen in Crowntails where the webbing is substantially reduced.
A Crowntail is not the same as a “combtail” or just another fringe-finned betta. It must be emphasized that fringed-fin bettas can and should be shown in other color classes where the extended rays ARE NOT counted against them.
Ray extensions should be thick, straight and prominent. Slightly outwardly curved extensions in caudals with double-rays are desirable to give the “cross-ray” effect.
Definition: For the purposes of judging and placement in this class, male Crowntails shall be defined as bettas exhibiting at least 33% reduction in webbing versus ray length in EACH of the three primary fins (caudal, anal and dorsal). For females, the minimum is 25%. This requirement must be demonstrated in all three primary fins but does NOT need to be exhibited in ALL rays.

Crowntail Types:
The following illustration shows variations of webbing reduction commonly exhibited by Crowntails.



Double Ray – webbing is reduced at two levels; one between a pair of rays and the other (more profoundly) between two branches. 4-ray and 8-ray extensions are less common and the effect is almost always confined to the caudal fin.
Single Ray – Web margins are, ideally, uniform and webbing reduction is equal between primary rays and rays with branches.
Cross Ray – In the schematic, this is manifested by pairs of primary rays which curve over each other.

Examples: The fish below exceeds the basic requirements by having at least 50% web reduction in all 3 primary fins.



This fish also shows the cross-ray effect as does the first picture at the beginning of this standard. In the case of the dorsal fin and the analfin, the extended portion of the ray is longer than portion surrounded by the webbing. The ventral fins also demonstrate a >50% reduction of the webbing.
The following picture shows a fish with double ray extension but the rays branch again to two rays – a so-called double-double ray (DDR). The effect is well-spread out throughout the caudal fin. The caudal spread is also exceptional demonstrating the 180° spread special. If evenly distributed, it is an acceptable but not conforming to our general standards. preferred characteristic.



FINNAGE REQUIREMENTS
Caudal: The caudal should display the splendor of a crown. The caudal rays should display at least double ray extension. 4 rays or more extensions are to be regarded as neutral. Caudal rays extension can either be straight or curved to cross for double-rays. Caudal spread requirements as for other single tails except for straight edge requirements. Straight caudal rays are acceptable but V rays and outward curving rays as in cross-rays are the preferred types.
Random Rays are single protruding rays in a double-ray or 4-ray Crowntail and are faulted.
Anal: A slight gradual curling of the rays are acceptable but parallel and straight rays are preferred.
Dorsal: A slight gradual curling of the rays are acceptable but kinks and curls faulted per the General Fault guide.
Ventral: For Crowntails, the pair of ventral fins has to display a jagged appearance
Balloon Effect: A finnage characteristic which seems to be unique to the Crowntails is the “balloon” effect. This can be described as additional webbing between the primary or secondary rays to give a parachute-like effect. Additional webbing between the double rays of a double ray caudal are characterized as “balok’ – these have a triangular shape. Photos do not seem to do this effect justice – the way the folds move as the fish swims is what makes the effect so special. If evenly distributed, it is an acceptable but not preffered characteristic.



Special Considerations in Judging Crowntails:
Desirable Traits for Crowntails:
1. 33% reduction in webbing material for each primary fin is a minimum for males.
2. 25% reduction in webbing material for each primary fin is a minimum for females.
3. Ray extensions should be uniform in balance, length and spacing.
4. Dorsal and anal ray extensions should be straight. A slightly proportionate curve toward the rear is acceptable.
5. Double ray or 4-ray extensions in the caudal fin only.
6. 50% reduction in webbing material in all three primary fins is IDEAL



FAULT GUIDE
The General Standards outlined in this chapter shall apply for Crowntails. Fin Curl, ideal 180° spread for caudal fin, minimum size requirement, etc., are covered in the fault guide. Color traits delineated in the Special standards apply to Crowntails.

Below are additional considerations for Crowntails:

SLIGHT FAULTS
1. Ray extensions slightly thinning.
2. Ray extensions displaying only single ray extension.
3. Ray extension splits slightly out of proportion.
4. Single “balloon” or balog folds.
5. Balloon/balog effect present but missing between a few rays.

MINOR FAULTS
1. Ray extensions of different non-uniform length.
2. Ray extensions displaying random rays.
3. Curled or bent extended rays.
4. Thinned out extended rays.
5. Ray extension splits out of proportion.
6. Ventrals lack jagged appearance.
7. 1 Broken ray extension.
8. Several random balloon / balog folds.
9. Balloon/balog effect present but missing between ~1/3 of rays.

MAJOR FAULTS
1. More than 1 broken ray extension.
2. For fish with balloon / balog effect -distributed randomly over 1/3 to 2/3 of caudal.
3. For fish with balloon / balog effect - present on only one fin.

SEVERE FAULTS
1. Ray extensions <33% in one primary fin (<25% for females).

DISQUALIFICATION
1. Ray extensions <33% in 2 or 3 fins (25% for females).

Singletail and Doubletail Crowntails are to be judged in the same color classes for Crowntails.

Fish that qualify as Crowntails as defined in this standard MUST be shown as Crowntails in an IBC sanctioned International show. The only exceptions are for Form or Color Variations.

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Chapter 5: Addendum PK Standard prt. 1

Lol I'll just finish the general standards for the tail types... procrastination curse you

IBC Standards - Chapter 5: Addendum PK Standard

TRADITIONAL PLAKAT STANDARDS
Plakats are the oldest of the domesticated Betta and are derived from animals bred for fighting. Show plakats bear certain distinctive features reflective of this ancestry. All plakats are short-tailed fish designed for rapid swimming. Specifically the dorsal and analfins should not greatly exceed the body width and the caudal fin should not exceed 1/3 of the body length. Relative to other show Betta, the plakat body form is more stout and body mass greater. Plakats are expected to be notably more aggressive than other show Betta, to have the demeanor of a pit bulldog, and be constantly on the alert for intruders.



The plakat classes are defined on differences in body form and finnage as well as color, as detailed in the standards below. The two plakat forms are the traditional plakat and the show plakat. Either of two plakat forms may be entered in the regular and New Breeder classes. Here they are judged not only relative to one another, but by the degree to which they are faithful exemplars of their class.
The traditional plakat may be shown in any color. Show plakat classes are recognized in all color types.
Judging on color criteria is performed in accord with the relevant typing system articulated in Chapter 6 and the corresponding special standards in Chapter 7. In addition to these colors an additional color -wild type -is available for plakats alone and fish of this color may be shown in either the traditional or appropriate show plakat class. The wild-type body is dark brown, with several rows of iridescent spots mostly on upper part of body. Scales edged in black. The head is dark above, lighter beneath, with little or no iridescence. Eyes are dark with iridescent flecks. The dorsal fin is iridescent green-gold, with black rays, and black irregular cross bands (flecks). The caudal displays a black trimmed edge and both red and green iridescent coloration in no distinct pattern. The analfin is colored similarly, but the posterior fin tip is red. The pectoral fins are colorless or black-edged and the ventral fins red, black and/or iridescent with white tips.
The scope of these standards applies to male single tail plakats. Double-tail plakat males must go into form variations; female double-tail plakats should go into regular double tail color classes for females.

FORM CRITERIA

Traditional Plakats
The traditional plakat is a stout, heavy bodied aggressive fish with distinctive finnage.



Dorsal: The dorsal fin may be either uniformly rounded or come to point (see figure).



Anal: The analfin has a trapezoid shape with the forward (anterior) edge shorter than the rear (posterior) edge. The posterior tip should be pointed (see figure at left). When flaring the rear edge of the analfin should overlap the lower portion of the caudal fin.



Caudal: The caudal fin may be either spade shaped (see figure) or photo by Chris Yew rounded. If spade-shaped the point should be at the midpoint of the fin. A caudal spread of 180° is preferred, but differs from the requirements for other show Betta and for other plakat classes in two respects. First the edges of the caudal fin are expected to be rounded rather than shaped in the configuration of the letter D (see figures). Second, the 180° caudal should not be achieved by greater than primary or secondary branching of the caudal fin rays. Thus the caudal spread in a traditional plakat is achieved by an increase in the volume of tissue between rays rather than by an increase in fin ray branching.





Ventral fins: Ventral fins can be either full or thin, but are expected to be photo by Chris Yew notably longer than in other show Betta, 2/3 the length of the length of the body (as measured from the base of the ventral fin to the caudal peduncle) or longer ¬see Figure.



Pectoral fins: As in other show Betta.

Traditional Plakat Form & Finnage Faults
1. Body excessively stout and heavy (Slight Fault)
2. Dorsal fin narrow (Minor Fault)
3. Ventral fins less than 2/3 body length (Minor Fault)
4. Caudal fin spread > 165°, but < 180° (Minor Fault)
5. Caudal branching greater than 2° (Minor Fault)
6. analfin rounded œ not pointed (Major Fault)
7. Caudal fin less than 165° (Major Fault)
8. Ventral fins 1/2 body length or less (Major Fault) photo by Chris Yew
9. Body extremely slender like some other Betta species (Major Fault).

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY.



...Too many images continued below...
 
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Chapter 5: Addendum PK Standard prt. 2

Show Plakat Standard



This is the most common of the plakat forms bred today, combining traits of traditional plakats and show Betta. Like the traditional, the form is asymmetrical.




The show plakat standard is the same in all respects to that of the traditional plakat with two essential exceptions:
Dorsal: The dorsal fin should be semi-circular and preferably snap open as a fan. In the most ideal situation the dorsal overlaps the upper part of the caudal. The upper front edge can be either sharp or slightly rounded.The capacity of the fin to open in this fashion is often achieved not by in increase in volume, but by an increase in fin ray branching and possibly a slight increase of rays. In the most ideal situation, the dorsal overlaps the upper part of the caudal. Overlap of the dorsal with the body is not desirable.
Caudal: Unlike the traditional plakat, the caudal fin is the same as the standard show Betta-. --. The caudal spread is 180 degrees, has straight rays, sharp edges and the shape of a semi-circle (capital —D“), no longer the 1/3rd the length of the body. The ray splitting should be evenly distributed with a secondary branching (4-ray) or more without becoming too excessive. A >180 degree spread (overhalfmoon, oHM) is not preferred above a 180 degree spread.
Anal: The analfin has a trapezoid shape with the front rays (anterior) part shorter than the rear (posterior) part. From the front to the back the anal show as gradual slope coming to a pointed tip. The longest ray of the anal ideally should be at least twice as long or longer (preferred) as the length of the outer rays of the caudal. During flaring, the front should be directed forward and the back should overlap the lower part of the caudal.
Ventrals: The shaper of the ventrals mimic the blade of a knife with the cutting edge directed backwards. The ventrals have a full appearance, are equal in length and should not appear to be permanently crossed. The length of the ventrals should be at least equal to the longest ray of the anal.
Pectoral fins: As in other show betta.





Show Plakat Form & Finnage Faults
1. Ventral fins slightly less than 2/3 body length (Slight Fault)
2. Ventral fins œ single tip preferred, double tips (Slight Fault)
3. Dorsal and anal-most caudal fin rays (—edge“ rays) shorter than other caudal fin rays (so-called ”rounded edges‘) (Minor Fault)
4. Dorsal fin without primary branching (Minor Fault)
5. Ventral fins 1/2 body length or slightly less (Minor Fault)
6. Branching in caudal fin <3° (Minor Fault)
7. analfin fails to slope strongly from anterior to posterior (Major Fault)
8. Tip of analfin fails to display extended point (Major Fault)
9. Less than 180° Caudal spread (Major Fault)

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY.

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Chapter 5: Addendum Shortfin HM Standard

I believe these are often referred to as either HMPK, symetrical PK's....

IBC Standard - Chapter 5: Addendum Shortfin HM Standard

SHORTFIN HALFMOON



Shortfin HM STM
Standard: The Shortfin HM is a short-finned version of the symmetrical long-finned show fish. Shortfin Halfmoons can be shown in any color and are judged for color by adherence to the ideals of that color standard. In all other respects, the Shortfin HM should mirror the standard show Betta in conformation and color. Specifically:
analfin: The analfin is expected to be rectangular in outline rather than sloping to a point. The last ray of the analfin should be no longer than the rest of the rays. Moreover, the length of the analfin should be equivalent to that of the caudal and dorsal so as to insure that a pleasing, continuous oval like shape is displayed. However a slightly longer (1/16“) (2mm) is tolerated matching the dorsal length, with emphasis on the rectangular outline.
Ventral fins: The ventral fins should be in balance with the length of the rest of the unpaired fins to preserve the symmetrical look. Ventral fins are not expected to be of a length comparable to that of the body. The length should be about twice the height of the analfin.
Dorsal fin: The dorsal fin may be of any shape. A larger, better matching to analfin is preferred over a smaller one, provided that the size does not distract from the symmetry of the fish. Like the analfin, a slightly longer (1/16“) (2mm) fin is tolerated. The desired effect is typically achieved by an increase in the number of fin rays.
Caudal fin: The caudal spread is 180 degrees, has straight rays, sharp edges and is the shape of a semi-circle (capital —D“), no longer than 1/3 length of the body. The rays should be evenly distributed above and below the centerline of the fish with a secondary branching (4-ray) or more without becoming too excessive. A >180 degree spread is not preferred above a 180 degree spread.
Pectoral Fins: As in other show bettas.



Shortfin HM -Form & Finnage Faults
1. analfin slopes slightly from front to back (Slight Fault).
2. Ventral fins œ Single tip preferred, double tips (Slight Fault).
3. Ventral fins overly long (Minor Fault).
4. Caudal Fin most outer caudal fin rays shorter than other caudal fin rays(so-called ”rounded edges‘) (MinorFault)
5. Lack of primary branching in Dorsal (Minor Fault).
6. Dorsal fin not full and/or lacking wide base (Minor Fault)
7. analfin slope substantially from front to back and/or posterior edge extends substantially, (more than 1/16“) below base of caudal (Major Fault)
8. Less than 180° caudal spread (Major Fault).

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY.

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IBC Standards: 2009-2010 Chapter 6 (Color)

IBC Standard - Chapter 6: Special Standards – Basis for Judging Color

The color typing system is hierarchical, with Bettas categorized into increasingly refined groupings. Each level in the hierarchy has a name, given below, which will be referred to throughout:
Categorization of the genus Betta:
- GROUPS
- Subgroups
- CATEGORIES
- Subcategories
- TYPES
- Subtypes
The diagram above shows the names of the various units into which Betta colors and patterns are divided. This division system is called the COLOR TYPING SYSTEM. Understanding the Color Typing System will explain why certain colors are faulted the way they are. Knowing the Color Typing System will improve your ability to provide quality judging at shows.
The Color Typing System does not distinguish sex (male or female), nor tail type (single tail or doubletail)) with which the Class System deals.

GROUPS
Bettas are considered to exist in five distinct groups:”
Single Colored Bettas
Bicolored Bettas
Patterned Bettas
Betta species
Special Exhibit Bettas
If a Betta is judged, and found to be in violation of the GROUP characteristics appropriate for the class in which it is entered it will be disqualified. For example, a Traditional Cambodian male entered in the RED class must be disqualified. This violates the GROUP Single Color characteristics appropriate to the RED class. Thus, failure of a Betta show entry to comply with the GROUP requirements is in fact an error in classification by the entrant, and unless reclassified, will be disqualified. No special standard color fault is more serious than a GROUP fault.

SUBGROUPS, CATEGORIES AND SUBCATEGORIES
To understand the breakdown of hierarchical categories below the GROUP level, it is useful to recognize three COLOR FACTORS that all Bettas can potentially display. These provide a logical breakdown below the GROUP level:
Dark under coloration, or lack of it
Iridescence, or lack of it
Opaque, or lack of it
Subgroups are defined by the presence of dark under coloration or lack thereof, Categories are based on the presence or absence of iridescence, and Subcategories delineate opaque fish from those lacking opaque.
For example, the Single Color Group is divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of the dark under coloration
Subgroup 1: Dark Single Color
Subgroup 2: Light Single Color

CATEGORIES
By considering the presence or absence of Iridescence, the Subgroups are broken down into
Categories:
Category 1: Non-iridescent
Category 2: Iridescent
Accordingly, the Subcategory level introduces a distinction based of the appearance of opaque. For example, the single color (GROUP), light (subgroup), iridescent (CATEGORY) is divided into two subcategories:
Subcategory 1: Non-Opaque
Subcategory 2: Opaque
The COLOR FACTORS which constitute the basis for defining Subgroups, Categories, and Subcategories hold only for two of the five Groups. Specifically, they apply to Group 1 (Single Color), and Group 2 (Bicolored).
Group 3 (Patterned Bettas) differ in that the subgroup categorization is based on the type of pattern present:
Subgroup 1: Butterfly
Subgroup 2: Marble
Subgroup 3: Multicolor

Lower levels in the Group 3 hierarchy also differ are specified in summary tables below. Group 4 (Betta species) and Group 5 (Special Exhibit Bettas) also differ as specifically addressed in Chapters 8 and 9, respectively.

TYPES AND SUBTYPES
The lower levels of the Special Standards are constructed around the 11 currently recognized primary colors, 6 secondary colors, and 5
primary patterns.

Primary colors
Red Blue Pastel
Black Steel Opaque
Yellow Turquoise Orange
Clear Green
Secondary colors
Pastel Blue
Pastel Green
Pastel White
Opaque Blue
Opaque Green
Opaque White
Primary Patterns
Single color
Bicolor
Butterfly
Marble
Multicolor
NOTE: The Copper color complex may add some
new colors to the Types and Subtypes.

SUMMARY AND EXAMPLES
With 6 levels in the hierarchy, an enormous number of combinations are possible. The class system, however, does not include show classes for all possible combinations. For example, we currently have no show class for a single color (Group), dark (Subgroup), iridescent (Category), opaque iridescent (sub-category) fish. This is evident in the following summary table, which is provided not only to illustrate this point, but also
to summarize the rationale introduced above.
Detailed tables follow for the lower hierarchical levels included in each of the five GROUPS.







THE COLOR TYPING SYSTEM
GROUPS
1 Single Color
2 Bicolor
3 Patterned

Proper judging of Bettas requires an understanding of how to treat improperly classified fish (category faults) relative to properly categorized fish with color faults. Explicit instructions on color faults are
provided in chapter 7 following next. Nonetheless, a brief survey here as to the system used in faulting is relevant. It may be useful to re-read this section after one has mastered material in Chapter 7.

JUDGING FOR COLOR
GENERAL COLOR FAULTS:
If a Betta shows a color fault, the degree of seriousness is a function of the level of the characteristic
violated.
Level .......................................... Degree of Fault
Group (or Subgroup)......................................Disqualifying
Category (or Subcategory).............................Severe (with exceptions)
Type (or Subtype)..........................................Major (with exceptions)

CATEGORY FAULT GUIDES:
It seems there are always exceptions to the rules. To help you with this, there is a Category Fault Guide provided for each Category/Subcategory, and a Type Guide for each Type/Subtype whenever necessary to highlight exceptions to the general fault guidance provided by the chart above.



A JUDGE MAY RAISE OR LOWER, BY ONE LEVEL, THE RATING OF EXCEPTIONAL FAULTS
All three examples below are Black with Steel Blue iridescence in varying amounts. Our Betta is in the middle. The Judge will probably decide that our Betta is the one to which a rating of MAJOR fault is to apply. He may raise the rating of the one on the right by one level of the guide – to SEVERE. And, likewise, he may lower the level of the left Betta to one of MINOR. He cannot raise any as either SLIGHT or DISQUALIFIED because that exceeds the rule of ONE LEVEL change to what the Color Guide specifies. UNLESS…if the iridescence on the body is sufficiently great that the Judge determines that the fish is a Steel Blue/Black BICOLOR, violating the Group Characteristic – SINGLE COLOR. That Betta
may be disqualified if not reclassified.



EMPHASIS OF COLOR JUDGING:
Judging for color is based on the particular unit of the Color Typing System in which a fault belongs, and that unit’s unique traits. Judges must avoid the, “Isn’t it the most beautiful Betta you’ve ever seen,” syndrome. Fabulous Bettas which do not meet the criteria specified for its color unit are faulted, even though they may indeed be beautiful. As you read, you will gain an appreciation for the principles of color classification applied throughout the system. The various official Groups, Subgroups, Categories, Subcategories, Types, and Subtypes are defined in the next chapter (7). Where they do not pertain, or have no impact on the judging decisions, some of these breakdown units are omitted from the explanations, though they remain a part of the system as shown on the charts accompanying the text.

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hi red ..ive merged all the threads for the IBC Standards: 2009-2010
 
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Thanks Shawnie
I broke it up just because I was thinking it was getting really long
 
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Chapter 7: Class A (Red's and Black's)

Thanks BB
You guys ready for more?
IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class A

GROUP--SINGLE COLORED BETTAS
Single colored Bettas show only one color on all body and fin surfaces, and in only one shade. There are two major subgroups: Single Dark Color, and Single Light Color. These are further divided into specific Types for each single color. The ideal single colored Betta shows no color other than the one naming the Type (except for the color observed in the eye pupil and gills). Beyond general Betta characteristics that always apply, the primary concern of judges in evaluating this type of Betta, is the uniformity, density, and nature of the color. In some cases a particular shade is more desirable and will be specified. Some of the Guides will show where to place “shades” of the primary color, but they cannot cover the subtle variant shades. Judges must subjectively make determinations about color shading. Low contrast is important in all cases for Single Colored Bettas. The color should be rated by directly shining a flashlight on it. The flashlight must not contain a color lens, nor should the color be assessed by shining the flashlight through the fins from the rear. That is okay when looking for an “invisible” fin wash, but not when judging shade. Make sure that lighting is good enough to make accurate color judgements.

GROUP CHARACTERISTIC--Single color Absence of the single color pattern is a disqualifying fault.

SUBGROUP--Single Dark Color
The term “dark” refers to the undercoating of black pigment that these Bettas have beneath the color that names the individual Type. The color names can be misleading. As an example, RED is often thought of as being, by definition “dark”--however, it is not the RED, but the RED WITH THE DARK UNDERCOATING that makes such a fish “dark”. A Red Betta without that undercoating of black would be classified as a “Light Single Colored” Betta. NOTE: In recent years red strains without a black pigment undercoat have been established. These Bettas exibit and increase of red pigment that can make it difficult to discern a dark undercoat and phenotypically represent a “dark” color. THIS RED TYPE HAS A TEMPORARY EXCEPTION TO THE SUBGROUP SINGLE DARK COLOR REQUIREMENT OF AN UNDERCOATING OF BLACK PIGMENT, AND MAY BE SHOWN IN THE EXISTING RED CLASS.

General Basis of Faults of the Dark Single Colored Bettas:
Colors not applicable to this Subgroup (dark) are faulted if they appear to any degree on any of the fish of this type. The principles which determine the arrangement of the fault charts found in this portion of the text are:
- Light colors are faulted on Dark subgroup Bettas.
- Iridescence is faulted on non-iridescent category Bettas.
- If a second color is present--the higher the contrast, the more severe the fault.
- The degree to which a second color intrudes also affects the severity of the fault.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = DARK UNDERCOATING Absence of the dark undercoating is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY--Non-Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPE -Red
A brilliant red is desired. Judges should be strict in accessing color quality and uniformity. Red was at one time perhaps the most fully developed and set of all the dark single colors. Bettas exhibiting the most even shade body to fins of brilliant red are given preference. Because red is a member of both non-iridescent and non-opaque categories, even a slight appearance of iridescence (including metallic) or opaque is a serious deficiency. Any touch of color other than red is a fault to some degree, as determined by the Judge using the IBC color type system.



**EXCEPTION TO DARK BODY RULE

SUBGROUP=SINGLE LIGHT COLOR
A temporary exception is given to light body based reds that meet the standards ideal for red color, and are now allowed to compete in the red class for the time being. The fish that comes closest to the ideal red color standard, all else being equal, will be given the higher placing in the class. Reds that are obvious light body bicolors should be moved to the bicolor class.

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPE -RED
Just as red bettas have been developed from dark-bodied lines, red strains have been developed from light-bodied bi-color (cambodian) lines. These fish lack the dark-bodied undercoating and often have cream or flesh colored parts on the head whereas reds with dark bodied undercoating would have a dark or olive coloring. Other than this mark of distinction, the light-bodied red can be difficult to distinguish from the dark-bodied red. As with yellow and orange, judges must beware of substantial contrast between the body and fin colors -unless reclassified to bicolor, disqualify.



Color faults of Red Bettas:
1. White ventrals (slight).
2. Color missing from pectorals (slight).
3. Black scales (minor unless extensive in which case it can be major; the judge should consider reclassing to Bicolor if severe).
4. Lighter shade of red on body vs. fins (minor unless excessive in which case it can be major; the judge should consider reclassing to Bicolor if severe).
5. Black edges on fins (minor).
6. Cream or flesh color on the head (minor unless extensive in which case it can be major).
7. Clear edges or streaks on fins (minor).
8. Presence of yellow or orange (major).
9. Black spots, streaks or patches (major).
10. Presence of Iridescence (Major if only a few rays or scales).
11. Presence of Iridescence (Severe – if extensive, the Judge should consider reclassing to Multicolor).
12. Presence of Metallic iridescence (Severe – can be major if relegated to a few scales or fin rays).
13. Presence of Opaque (disqualifying fault; severe if restricted to ventrals).

CATEGORY-NON-IRIDESCENT Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPE – Black
The ideal color is a very dark, dense, “black mollie” color. Other than green, black is the least fully set of the dark single colors. This is largely due to the requirement to breed for black without using the normally infertile black females. Some lines, for example, have used steel blue females extensively and thus, not surprisingly, have led to blacks with considerable iridescence present. This is particularly unfortunate since black; by its category definition is a non-iridescent color. As in Red, the presence of iridescence or opaque is serious. Because the iridescence problem is an offshoot of breeding problems, the presence of steel blue iridescence is not rated as seriously as in Red. NOTE: A relatively recently developed (2003) combination of True Black and Black Lace provides “melano” females that are fertile. This type is called, “Double Black.”
Subtype--True Black
A dark, “pitch” black is preferred -usually referred to as “melano.” These often have the desired dark black on the fins but suffer from iridescence on the body. The latter must be faulted according to the extent and type of iridescence.



Subtype--Black Lace
A black betta with translucent webbing between the fin rays. This type of black is much less desirable.

Subtype--Double Black
As for all blacks, a dark, “pitch” black is preferred without iridescence on the body and fins.



Color faults of Black Bettas:
1. White ventrals (slight).
2. Color missing from pectorals (slight).
3. Red on fins (minor unless extensive in which case it can be major or the judge can move to multicolor or butterfly class).
4. Clear on edges or streaks on fins (minor – can be major if extensive).
5. Presence of steel Iridescence (Major – if extensively covering body, should be moved to dark-body bi-colors).
6. Presence of green or blue Iridescence (Severe – if extensively covering body, should be moved to bi-colors) consider moving the Betta to the Multicolor class).
7. Presence of metallic Iridescence (Severe – if extensively covering body, should be moved to Bicolor or Multicolor class if uneven spread). Intrusion of Metallic on the body can manifest itself as spots of yellow against a black background.
8. Presence of “Rust” (Severe but must be obvious).
9. Presence of Opaque is a Disqualifying fault unless restricted to ventrals).

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Chapter 7: Class B (Blue's and Greens)

IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class B

GROUP B-- IRIDESCENT BETTAS

IRIDESCENT means: Blue, Steel Blue, Turquoise, and Green. These fish have a unique problem, that of analfin wash. Visible wash follows the fault levels specified for the color of the wash. “Invisible” wash can only be seen by shining a flashlight through the fins from the opposite side from the viewer. The Judge ignores this type of wash.

One of the common concerns with the dark iridescent colors is learning to recognize them from each other. This chart shows their relative position on the “blue-green” scale:

Decreasing “blueness”----------> <----------Decreasing “greenness”
BLUE-STEEL BLUE-TURQUOISE-COMMONGREEN-TRUE GREEN

Another concern is the pervasiveness of the metallic genes in iridescent lines. Judges must judge phenotype and not the presumed genetics of show bettas. However, judges must be able to distinguish dark-bodied metallic bettas with an iridescent base from the Group B iridescent bettas.

CATEGORY—Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE - BLUE
A deep Royal Blue is ideal. Blue, like all of the dark single colors (except green) is well established with a wide concurrence on its purity. It’s presence in a non-opaque category makes the absence of all opaque an essential trait. This color often suffers from the presence of a color “wash”, particularly in the analfin. Though common, the presence of any other color is a fault.



Color Faults for Blue Bettas
1. White ventrals (slight fault).
2. Lack of blue iridescence on head (slight fault).
3. Lack of color on pectorals ( slight fault).
4. Yellow wash (minor fault).
5. Red in ventrals (minor fault).
6. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault).
7. Blue coloration fading in shades to steel (minor fault) or fading to shades of green or turquoise (major fault).
8. Blue coloration not of uniform hue (major fault).
9. Red wash (major fault).
10. Blue coloration not uniformly spread (severe fault).
11. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault).
12. Presence of any red color (severe fault unless relegated to ventrals).
13. Large amounts of Metallic coloration over 10% coverage requires moving to the dark metallic class.
14. Absence of a dark undercoating (disqualifying fault).
15. Presence of opaque (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY—Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – STEEL BLUE
Also called gunmetal blue, this color has a silver iridescence when compared to the Blue Betta. Perhaps slightly “grayer” in appearance to some observers. A “grayer”, less bluish color is desired.



Color Faults for Steel Blue Bettas
1. White ventrals (slight fault).
2. Lack of steel blue iridescence on head (slight fault).
3. Lack of color on pectorals (slight fault).
4. Yellow wash (minor fault).
5. Red in ventrals (minor fault).
6. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault).
7. Steel Blue coloration fading in shades to blue (minor fault) or fading to shades of green (major fault) or turquoise (major fault).
8. Steel Blue coloration not of uniform hue (major fault).
9. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault).
10. Red wash (major fault).
11. Steel Blue coloration not uniformly spread (severe fault).
12. Presence of any red color (severe fault unless relegated to ventrals).
13. Large amounts of Metallic coloration over 10% coverage requires moving to the dark Metallic class.
14. Absence of a dark undercoating (disqualifying fault).
15. Presence of opaque (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY—Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – TURQUOISE
Ideally, a darker shade of the color of the mineral Turquoise. This type of Betta has had a stormy past history because of its confusion with the Green type. Color preference is toward the lighter “aqua”, “turquoise” tones of the blue rather than the darker green/yellow shades. It should appear to be a single even overall shade, rather than a mixture of blues and greens.



Color Faults for Turquoise Bettas
1. White ventrals (slight fault).
2. Lack of turquoise iridescence on head (slight fault).
3. Lack of color on pectorals ( slight fault).
4. Yellow wash (minor fault).
5. Red in ventrals (minor fault).
6. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault).
7. Turquoise coloration fading in shades to green (minor fault) or fading to shades of blue (major fault) or steel blue (major fault).
8. Turquoise coloration not of uniform hue (major fault).
9. Red wash (major fault).
10. Turquoise coloration not uniformly spread (severe fault).
11. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault).
12. Presence of any red color (severe fault unless relegated to the ventrals).
13. Large amounts of Metallic coloration over 10% coverage requires moving to the dark metallic class.
14. Absence of a dark undercoating (disqualifying fault).
15. Presence of opaque (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY—Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – GREEN
Ideally, a grass or forest green. Darker rather than brighter shades are desired. Green is the least fixed dark single color type because it is complicated by a tendency to vary in shade. There are at least two distinct subtypes. Subtype 1, True Green, has preference though the second subtype is more common. Green is not to be confused with Turquoise which has a much more distinct blue hue. Teal color is from metallic and should be moved to dark-bodied metallic.

Subtype--True Green
This sub-classification contains those Green Bettas that have a true “forest green” or “grass green” and are given intentional preference when judging.

Subtype--Common Green
Most “Green” Bettas are, in fact, this type, which is less desirable than true green. Common green is a bluish green fish although it has less blue than a turquoise--an often difficult fine hue distinction.



Color Faults for Green Bettas
1. White ventrals (slight fault)
2. Lack of green iridescence on head (slight fault)
3. Lack of color on pectorals ( slight fault)
4. Yellow wash (minor fault)
5. Red in ventrals (minor fault)
6. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault)
7. Green coloration fading in shades to turquoise (minor fault) or fading to shades of blue (major fault) or steel blue (major fault)
8. Green coloration not of uniform hue (major fault)
9. Red wash (major fault).
10. Green coloration not uniformly spread (severe fault).
11. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault)
12. Presence of any red color (severe fault unless relegated to ventrals).
13. Large amounts of Metallic coloration, over 10% coverage, including teal and emerald requires moving to the dark metallic class
14. Absence of a dark undercoating (disqualifying fault).
15. Presence of opaque (disqualifying fault)

CATEGORY—Iridescent
Subcategory— Opaque

No Types within this grouping are officially recognized. Blue, Steel Blue, Turquoise, or Green dark bodies Bettas with an opaque covering would belong here.

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Chapter 7: Class C (Yellow, Orange, Opaque, Pastel, etc.)

IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class C

SUBGROUP--Single Light Color

General Basis of Faults of the Light Single Colored Bettas:
The “light” single colors differ from the single dark color Bettas primarily by lacking an undercoat of black coloration. The Colors not applicable to this Subgroup (light) are faulted if they appear to any degree on one of the fish of this type. The principles which determine the arrangement of the fault charts found in this portion of the text are:
- Dark colors are faulted on Light subgroup Bettas.
- Iridescence or metallic coloration is faulted on non-iridescent category Bettas.
- If a second color is present, and in high contrast with the main color, the more severe the fault.
- The degree to which a second color intrudes also affects the degree of severity of the fault.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Absence of dark undercoating
Presence of the dark undercoating is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE - ORANGE



Orange lines have been developed from marble and from light-bodied bi-color lines. The desired color is brilliant orange and yet “translucent” as in the flesh of a navel orange (and less like the peel). Red does not contrast as much as in yellow or clear bettas so it is not faulted as severely. Beware of light body bi-colors with orange fins - unless reclassified, disqualify.

Color faults of Orange Bettas:
1. Red vein effect (slight fault).
2. Clear / lack of color in fins (minor fault).
3. Black specs (minor fault if few in number; major if substantial).
4. Red streaks on fins (minor fault).
5. Black spots, streaks or patches (major fault).
6. Iridescence or metallic coloration (severe fault unless relegated to a few fin rays detectable by flashlight which can be major fault).
7. Presence of Opaque (disqualifying fault).
8. The presence of Black under-coloration (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – YELLOW

A brilliant yellow is ideal. Colors which tend to be very pale yellow or a brown tinted yellow are not desirable. Yellow results from a trait which transforms red, therefore the presence of red--except the vein line) is a serious error. WATCHOUT for Yellow Cambodians in a yellow class--unless reclassified, disqualify.



Color faults of Yellow Bettas:
1. Red vein effect (slight fault).
2. Clear / lack of color in fins (minor fault unless substantial which can be major fault).
3. Black specs (minor fault if few in number; major if substantial).
4. Red streaks on fins (major fault).
5. Brown tint on fins (major fault).
6. Black spots, streaks or patches (major fault).
7. Iridescence or metallic coloration (severe fault unless relegated to a few fin rays detectable by flashlight which can be major fault).
8. Presence of Opaque (disqualifying fault).
9. The presence of Black under-coloration (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – CLEAR

Transparent body and fins are ideal. Colors from the body organs, however, cause the body to appear “pink”--others use the words “flesh-colored” or “creme” to describe this same color. The presence of any other color is a serious error.

Subtype—Cellophane
A colorless Betta body--flesh colored--with transparent fins. Eyes are dark, not red. Occasionally the cellophane is thought to be a bicolor: Pink/Clear. While that view is understandable it is not correct in the standards definition of cellophane. The cellophane is considered a single color. The name of that color is “clear”. The pink of the body is due to the flesh/organs of the fish.

Subtype—Albino
Like cellophanes, these are colorless Bettas both in body and in fins. The eyes also show no coloration and are therefore red in appearance.

Color faults of Clear Bettas:
1. Red vein effect (slight fault).
2. Yellow or orange (minor fault).
3. Black specs (minor fault if few in number; major if substantial).
4. Red streaks on fins (major fault).
5. Black spots, streaks or patches (major fault).
6. Iridescence or metallic coloration (severe fault unless relegated to a few fin rays detectable by flashlight which can be major fault).
7. Presence of Opaque (disqualifying fault).
8. The presence of Black under-coloration (disqualifying fault).

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent
Subcategory—Opaque

No Types within this grouping are officially recognized. Yellow light bodied Bettas with an opaque covering would belong here.

CATEGORY— Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE - PASTELS

Pastel colors include Pastel Blue, Pastel Green, Pastel White, etc. All of these lack dark under-coloration and heavy iridescent density. Therefore “green” for example is considerably different from the definition of “green” when referring to a single dark color Betta. Opaque Bettas (described below), and even semi-opaque Bettas are not acceptable as Pastels.

All permitted entries must be non-red or Red-loss and light-bodied. Thus they cannot show red or black under coloration. A light “dusting” of iridescence should cover the entire body and fins of the fish. The fins may be transparent, or translucent. These fish should not show opaque, no matter how slight.

Subtype--Pastel Blue



A light Sky Blue is ideal. Pale blue coloration that appears to lack the typical dark or “black” under-coloration. Must not show opaque, however slight. Its presence in a non-opaque category makes the absence of all opaque an essential trait. Though common, the presence of green tones is a fault.

Subtype--Pastel Green

A light pale Green is ideal. Pale green coloration that appears to lack the typical dark or “black” under-coloration. Must not show opaque, however slight. Its presence in a non-opaque category makes the absence of all opaque an essential trait. Though common, the presence of blue tones is a fault.

Subtype--Pastel White



A light, “silvery” White is ideal. Pale steel blue coloration that appears to lack the typical dark or “black” under-coloration. Must not show opaque, however slight. Its presence in a non-opaque category makes the absence of all opaque an essential trait. Though common, the presence of blue or green tones is a fault.

Color faults of Pastel Bettas:
1. Clear / lack of color in fins (minor fault unless >half in which case this is a major fault).
2. Black specs (minor fault if few in number; major if substantial).
3. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault).
4. Secondary Iridescence color, i.e. blue on a green pastel (major fault).
5. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault).
6. Presence of Opaque (severe fault – even if relegated to just the head); if the Opaque is prevalent the Judge should consider moving the Betta to the appropriate Opaque class.
7. The presence of Black under-coloration (disqualifying fault).
8. The presence of Red coloration (disqualifying fault unless they are small light spot or two of random Red color is to be faulted at the Judge’s discretion).
9. Large amounts of Metallic coloration over 10% coverage requires moving to the light metallic class.

CATEGORY— Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque
TYPE – OPAQUES

The fish under this category/subcategory are, by common practice called “opaques.” Opaque colors include Opaque Blue, Opaque green, and Opaque White, etc. All of these also lack dark under coloration.

All permitted entries must be non-red or Red-loss and light-bodied. Thus they cannot show red or black under coloration. They MUST show opaque which covers the body.

Subtype--Opaque Blue
A light powder Blue is ideal. Basically contains the same colors as the Pastels. However, the fish is covered by a coat of Opaque pigment. Pale blue coloration which appears to lack the typical dark or “black” under-coloration is essential. Must show opaque. Though common, the presence of green tones is a fault.

Subtype--Opaque Green
A light powder Green is ideal. Pale green coloration which appears to lack the typical dark or “black” undercoloration. Must be opaque. Though common, the presence of blue tones is a fault.

Subtype--Opaque White
Brilliant dense white coloration which appears to lack the typical dark or “black” under-coloration. Must be opaque. Though common, the presence of non-white tones is a fault.



Opaque White?
Though you will find the term OPAQUE WHITE used throughout this manual, it is more correctly referred to as OPAQUE STEEL BLUE since that is what the fish actually is genetically. However, judging does not concern itself with genetics, and therefore, it is accepted practice to refer to the fish by its phenotypic common name.

Color faults of Opaque Bettas:
1. Clear / lack of color in fins (minor fault unless >half in which case this is a major fault)
2. Black specs (minor fault if few in number; major if substantial)
3. Barely visible metallic coloration, usually on lips & cheeks (minor fault)
4. Secondary Iridescence color, i.e. blue on a white or green opaque (major fault)
5. Small amount(s) of metallic coloration, up to 10% coverage (major fault)
6. Opaque covering eyes (disqualifying if the fish cannot see; it will not flare against a fish that it should see in a container next t it)
7. The presence of Black under-coloration (disqualifying fault)
8. The presence of Red coloration (disqualifying fault unless they are small light spot or two of random Red color is to be faulted at the Judge’s discretion)
9. Large amounts of Metallic coloration over 10% coverage requires moving to the light metallic class

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Chapter 7: Class D (Bicolour)

IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class D

GROUP D--BICOLORED BETTAS

These are two color bettas. The body of a bicolor must be one single color and the fins must be one single, but different color than the body. Further categorization is determined by the specific body color. Technically, the Bicolor is one of the Patterned Bettas, but by common practice it is considered as a separate entry.

Different Colors?
The allowable fin and body colors are the same as listed under the Single Colored Bettas. Therefore, it is not necessary to describe the colors of each of the Bicolor Types below.

GROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Bicolor Absence of the bicolor pattern is a disqualifying fault.



Emphasis of Judging Bicolored Bettas:
The primary concern centers on the two colors. Absolutely sharp restriction of one color to the body and the other to the fins is essential. The body colors are judged using the color descriptions found earlier. Contrast is also an important factor in judging bi¬color bettas – all other things being equal a red-bodied fish with orange fins will not compete very well against a blue-bodied fish with yellow fins, since the latter shows much more contrast between the colors.

SUBGROUP—Dark-bodied Bicolor
Those Bettas that have a dark body--colors include Extended Red, Black, Blue, Steel Blue, Turquoise, Green, Teal, Metallic Green, Copper, Metallic Purple—and any other fin color. Dark-bodied metallic and other colors which do not have a single color description in these standards, i.e. brown, should be shown in Color Variations class because there is no existing basis (single color standard) for judging the color of those fish. “Masked” fish – those with body color extending to the head and gill plates should not be faulted but given the advantage.

General Basis of Faults of the Dark-bodied Bicolor Bettas:
Body colors which are not one of the six dark colors described earlier are not permitted and should be moved to a more appropriate class. The Fins can be one of the other dark colors or they may be one of the described light colors.
- Contrast is important.
- The body and fin colors should be strictly separated at the body/fin junctions.
- If additional colors are present on the body or fins that is a fault treated as explained by the color fault guides for Single Colored Bettas. For example, a Red Body--with iridescence on it--is scored in accordance with the Red Color Guide. The fins, if they are black for example, are scored as in the Black Color Guide.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Dark body undercoating Absence of the dark body undercoating is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY--Non-Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPE (same as for dark single colors)

Based on the color of the body refer to the appropriate Single Color Fault Guide. If there are unique Subtypes--those that have been given special recognition--they are included here. The Bicolor Subtypes are named in this format “Body/Fin”, thus Red/White means a Bicolor Betta that has a Red Body and White Fins.

Category and Type Guides: See the guides for the color of the body found in the Single color section.



Subtype--Black/Yellow (Chocolate)
This is the only recognized subtype in this category. The “black” of the body is a reduced color, closer to a brown.



CATEGORY—Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPE (same as for dark single colors)

Subcategory--Opaque
No Types within this grouping are officially recognized. Blue, Steel Blue, Turquoise, or Green dark bodied Bicolor Bettas with an opaque covering would belong here.

Color Fault Guide for Dark Bodied Bi-Color Bettas
1. Lack of body color on head (slight fault).
2. Lack of fin color on pectorals (slight fault).
3. Slight bleeding of body color into fins OR vice versa (slight fault if restricted to one of the unpaired fins; minor if on 2 or all 3 unpaired fins).
4. Third color intrusion (slight to severe depending on amount and particular color – see single color guide) amount can be SLIGHT – a few rays, edge of one fin, or scales to SEVERE – i.e. nearly all rays in all unpaired fins color can be SLIGHT – green on turquoise to SEVERE – opaque on black (see single color guide) (amount severity + color severity) /2 = fault for 3rd color intrusion.
5. Contrast between body and fin colors is poor (major fault). Slight bleeding of body color into fins AND fin color bleeds into body (major fault).
6. Substantial bleeding of body color into fins OR vice versa (major fault).
7. Bleeding of body color into 1/3 or more of one or more non-paired fins (severe fault).
8. Bleeding of fin color into 1/3 or over body color (severe fault).

SUBGROUP--Light Bodied Bi-color
A distinctly two-colored Betta with a light colored body, that is, flesh, opaque, pastel, orange, yellow, light red or any of these colors with metallic. Any color of fin different than the body color is acceptable.

General Basis of Faults of the Light Bicolored Bettas:
Body colors which are not one of the light colors described above are not permitted.. The Fins can be one of the other light colors or may be one of the described dark colors.
- Contrast is important therefore dark colored fins have preference over light fins.
- The body and fin colors should be strictly separated at the body/fin junctions.
- If additional colors are present on the body or fins that is a fault treated as explained by the color fault guides for Single Colored Bettas. For example, a Yellow Body—with iridescence on it—is scored in accordance with the Yellow Color Guide. The fins, if they are black for example, are scored as presented above in the Black Color Guide.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Absence of dark body undercoating Presence of the dark body undercoating is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY—Non-Iridescent
Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPES—(Body Colors) Yellow, Orange, Clear
This is the only Type with recognized Subtypes. The body must be “flesh” color, the fins may be any other color except clear. Any dark color of fins is considered high contrast. A light color, such as a “yellow Cambodian,” can be quite difficult to distinguish from a pale all-yellow Betta. “Cambodian” is defined as a flesh-colored body with fins of another color except transparent as in Cellophane.

Subtype—Clear/Red (Traditional Cambodian)
“Traditional Cambodian” is defined as a flesh-colored body with Red Fins. Fin colors other than red are commonly referred to as Cambodian AOC (Any Other Color) collectively.



The judging phenotype term Cambodian defined here should not be confused with the genetic definition of the “Cambodian” trait which is “absence of black pigment”. The latter definition is not used for judging. For classes named “Cambodian”, only a flesh-colored body—Cambodian or Cellophane—is permitted. If the class is further described as “Traditional Cambodian”, the body must be “flesh” color and the fin color is restricted to Red.

CATEGORY—Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque TYPES—(Pastel Body Colors) Blue, Green, and White (Steel)
Example: Pastel Green body/Yellow fins.

CATEGORY—Iridescent Subcategory—Opaque TYPES—(Opaque Body Colors) Blue, Green, White
Example: Opaque White body/Red fins.
Color intrusion from either the body to the fins or from the fins to the body is one of the greatest variables in judging Bicolors.

Color Fault Guide for Light-Bodied Bi-Color Bettas
1. Lack of body color on head (slight fault).
2. Lack of fin color on pectorals (slight fault).
3. Slight bleeding of body color into fins OR vice versa ( slight fault if restricted to one of the unpaired fins; minor if on 2 or all 3 unpaired fins).
4. Third color intrusion (slight to severe depending on amount and particular color – see single color guide) amount can be SLIGHT – a few rays, edge of one fin, or scales to SEVERE – i.e. nearly all rays in all unpaired fins color can be SLIGHT – green on turquoise to SEVERE – opaque on black (see single color guide!) (amount severity + color severity) / 2 = fault points for 3rd color intrusion.
5. Contrast between body and fin colors is poor (major fault).
6. Slight bleeding of body color into fins AND fin color bleeds into body (major fault).
7. Substantial bleeding of body color into fins OR vice versa (major fault).
8. Bleeding of body color into 1/3 or more of one or more non-paired fins (severe fault).
9. Bleeding of fin color into 1/3 or over of body color (severe fault).

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Chapter 7: Class E (Butterfly, Marble, Multi, Grizzle)

IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class E

GROUP--PATTERNED BETTAS

All Bettas have a —pattern“. There are actually five patterns but, here again, we have a term that can be deceiving. The first two patterns are considered under their sections--the Single Color, pattern one and the Bicolor, pattern two, Bettas. So, normally when one hears the term —patterned“ it refers only to the last three of the five patterns: the BUTTERFLY Bettas, the MARBLE Bettas, and the MULTICOLOR Bettas.

Emphasis of Judging Patterned Bettas:
Beyond general Betta characteristics that always apply, the primary concern of judges in evaluating this kind of Betta is the uniformity, density, and nature of the pattern. The fault levels allocated to color are assigned to the pattern and not the colors within the pattern.

GROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Non-singlecolor or bicolor Presence of the singlecolor or bicolor pattern is a disqualifying fault.

SUBGROUP--Butterfly

The Butterfly is a variegated Betta with a very specific fin pattern. The key is in the fins that display a banded pattern. Emphasis is placed on the contrast and crispness of the band not the coloring of the body and fins. The band should be crisp not just a lightening of opposing fin color. For example, a yellow Betta with yellow fins that have a lighter yellow outer band is not a butterfly but a fish with distinct yellow and clear bands on the fins is a butterfly. Bands should scribe an even oval around the fish. There are two forms the banding may take: A fin pattern with two bands, where the fins are divided in half by two opposing colors, and a multiple, three or more, band pattern, where the fins are divided equally between the number of bands. The multiple band pattern is sometimes difficult to identify since two of the bands, though distinct, may be subtle but different shades of the same color. In this case, shining a flashlight from behind the fins may aid in detecting this trait but the lack of definition between bands is considered a fault. The body color of the Butterfly Betta and the color in the first fin band may be either a single color, bicolored, marbled, or multicolor.



General Basis of Faults of the Butterfly Bettas
The principles which determine the fault levels found in this portion of the text are:
- For two band fins, the bands should occupy 1/2 the fin on all fins.
- For multiple band fins, each band should occupy 1/[number of bands] of the fin area on all fins.
- The dividing line between fin bands should be straight and scribe an oval around the Betta.
- The degree to which a second color intrudes, lack of crisp definition, also affects the degree of severity of the fault.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Butterfly Pattern Absence of the Butterfly pattern is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY– Single Color based Subcategory – Two and Multiple Bands TYPE - Red / Red-White

In this kind of butterfly the body must be one color. The inner band on the fins must be the same color as the body. The outer fin band should occupy the appropriate percentage of the fin/fins and maintain a different single color within the band. Bettas of this Category are named in the following sequence: Body color/Inner band--Outer band. Though only one subtype is shown here to represent them, there are actually many: Red/Red-clear, etc. The color possibilities are same as those shown in the Single Color group.

CATEGORY– Bicolor based Subcategory – Two Bands
Bicolor based butterflies are just like the Bicolor group of Bettas except that the fins have a third color in the outer bands on the fins. Again, the outer band ideally is one color and covers 1/2 the area of each fin.

TYPE - Clear / Red-White
This is a representative of the Types that are available. Rather than list all of them, let it be sufficient to say that the body and inner band are those colors found among the Bicolor group with an outer band of any other color. This type is commonly called a Cambodian butterfly.

Subcategory – Multiple Bands
For these, the outer bands ideally cover 1/[number of bands] of the area of each fin. If there are 3 bands, for example, each band covers 1/3 of the fin area.

TYPE - Clear / White-Red-White
While all multiple banded Bettas might be impressive, it is the unique contrast of the dark central band that made the Tutweiler Betta famous.

CATEGORY– Marble based Subcategory – None
The body must be as described in the Marble Classification. The inner fin band may be any solid color or it may be marbled though that would probably disrupt the inner band‘s appearance of uniformity. In the later case, the outer band must still be distinctly different than the inner band. Sharp division of the marble pattern is preferable to blending.

CATEGORY– Multicolor Based Subcategory – None
The body and inner band must conform to the Multicolor Betta as described in the Multicolor Classification. The outer band/bands may contain different colors in the same band. Sharp division and contrast between bands is preferred to blending.

Color faults of Butterfly Bettas:
1. Lack of butterfly pattern in pectoral fins ( slight fault).
2. Lack of butterfly pattern in ventral fins (minor fault).
3. Jagged separation between colors on pattern in one unpaired fin (minor fault).
4. Blurred, non-crisp separation between colors on pattern in one unpaired fin (minor fault).
5. light third color intrusion (not part of pattern) on fins (minor fault).
6. Less than 1/2 of fin length but more than 1/4 occupied by one of the two colors in one fin (minor fault).
7. Bleeding of fin pattern color into body (minor fault).
8. On 3-banded patterns - 3rd band is less than 1/4 of length of fin (minor fault).
9. On 3-banded patterns - 3rd band is missing on dorsal fin (minor fault).
10. Lack of contrast between colors in pattern (minor fault).
11. On 3-banded patterns - 3rd band is missing on caudal or analfin (major fault).
12. Jagged separation between colors on pattern in two or more unpaired fin (major fault).
13. Blurred, non-crisp separation between colors on pattern in two or more unpaired fin (major fault).
14. Less than 1/2 of fin length but more than ³ occupied by one of the two colors in two or more unpaired fins (major fault).
15. Less than 1/4 of fin length occupied by one of the two colors in one unpaired fins (major fault).
16. Lack of butterfly pattern in any unpaired fin (major fault).
17. Less than 1/4 of fin length occupied by one of the two colors in two or more unpaired fins (severe fault) .
18. Lack of butterfly pattern in 2 unpaired fins (severe fault).
19. Lack of butterfly pattern (Disqualifying fault).

SUBGROUP--Marble

The Marble Betta, like the Butterfly, is a Patterned Betta. However, it is variegated in a different manner. The key differences are the lack of fin banding and the presence of other colors on the body in a —marbled“ effect. Two types of Marbles exist, the —Traditional Marble“ or piebald, which is a dark bodied fish with a white head and/or face, and the newer —Colored Marble“ which may have many colors other than the black/flesh/white combination. Though cellophane is sometimes considered to be a genetic marble variant, it is not classed as a marble phenotypically. The fins and body must show at least two colors. These must include a light and dark color mix. Fish exhibiting sharp —edges“ to the marbling pattern are preferred over those with blended colors.



General Basis of Faults of the Marble Bettas:
The principles which determine the arrangement of the fault charts found in this portion of the text are:
- Mixing of the colors is a must - marbled“.
- High Contrast between light and dark colors with good definition
- Symmetrical marbles should be studied closely for reclassification as variations.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC - Marble pattern Absence of the marble pattern is a disqualifying fault.

CATEGORY– None Subcategory – None TYPE - PIEBALD



This is the type of marble also known as Traditional Marble. It distinctly lacks the colors red, green, blue, and steel blue that appear on colored marbles. The newer Metallic colors would also not be present on the Traditional Marble. Fins also do not contain those colors, and the fish is a mixture of black/flesh/white.

TYPE - COLORED
The face/chin area retains characteristic marble flesh-color or white, but the body and fins may show a mix of red, green, blue, and steel blue. The fish should not be faulted if the face/chin is a different color (black or red) as long as the fish has a definite marble pattern on the body. The body of these colored marbles may include any of the aforementioned colors, but must also included flesh-color. The color mixes with greater contrast are preferred. A mix of only green and red, for example, is not sufficient.

TYPE - RED MARBLE
This representative subtype shows the same colors of the piebald, but includes red. Other subtypes include the color of their name.



Color faults of Marble Bettas:
1. A 50/50 blend between light and dark colors is ideal. Between 25% -33% of either dark or light colors (minor fault) Exception to 1: A good —Dalmatian“ pattern with even spread of spots and good contrast should not be faulted.
2. Pattern has poor contrast in 1 unpaired fin only (minor fault).
3. Less than 25% of either dark or light colors (major fault).
4. Lack of marble pattern in one unpaired fin (major fault).
5. Pattern has poor contrast in body (major fault).
6. Pattern has poor contrast in body and 1 or more unpaired fins (severe fault).
7. Lack of pattern on body (severe fault).
8. Lack of pattern in two unpaired fins (severe fault).
9. Butterfly pattern on 1 or more unpaired fins should not be faulted if the fish has a good marble pattern on the body. The exhibitor has the option of showing a fish with a butterfly pattern on all three unpaired fins in the butterfly class.

SUBGROUP--Multicolor



This designation is for Bettas with two or more colors that do not fit into any of the other patterned categories. Ideally, the colors are in high contrast to each other. The colors are those normally seen in Bettas. However, simply having the head alone a different color or only having a different color on the tip of the ventrals is not sufficient to be designated as Multicolor. Judges need be particularly cautious of Bettas shown as Multicolor that show as a second color only a fine wash, such as a —Blue with a bad Red wash“, which is not sufficient.



SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC - Non-singlecolor or bicolor Presence of the singlecolor or bicolor is a disqualifying fault.

Color faults of Multicolor Bettas:
1. Only two colors œ both present in all unpaired fins and body (minor fault).
2. Only two colors with the body or one or more of the unpaired fins being a single solid color (major fault).
3. Dull coloring or lack of bright colors (major fault).
4. One color is dominant (>80%) over the others (major fault).
5. Poor contrast between the colors (i.e. green blue and turquoise) (major fault).
6. Only two colors and one is only a light red or yellow wash (severe fault).
7. Only two colors and one is clear patches in fins (severe or disqualify and move to single-color if clearing is minimal).
8. Marble pattern on body (disqualify and move, if allowed, to marble class). NOTE: do not disqualify a fish that only has flesh/yellow color on the face/chin. These may be genotypically marble but can compete in multicolor if they lack any other marble pattern and, yet, have good blend of colors.
9. Butterfly pattern on 2-3 unpaired fins (disqualify and move, if allowed, to butterfly class). Note: a multicolor should not be faulted for having butterfly-type pattern on a single unpaired fin.

Contrast?
When the standards refer to contrast it means the relationship of the categorized colors.
High Contrast = Dark vs. Light / Iridescent vs. Non-Iridescent / Opaque vs. Non-Opaque. Low Contrast = Colors within the same Subgroup, Category, Subcategory, or Type.

SUBGROUP–Grizzled



The Grizzle Betta is a patterned Betta. The grizzling shows a random flecking, spotting, or peppering of any iridescent color over a pastel or opaque body. Each of the fins should demonstrate some grizzled pattern exhibiting a swirled or paint brush stroke effect of color on all of the unpaired fins. Fins and body should show distinctly two shades of iridescent color (any one of the iridescent colors combined with the lighter pastel or opaque base color). Fish exhibiting an even spread, close to 50% iridescence and 50% lighter base color are preferred. No one grizzle color is preferred over another.

Color faults of Grizzled Bettas:
1. The presence of Black (minor fault). If the Black is extensive the Judge should consider moving the Betta to the Marble class.
2. The presence of Red (major fault). If the Red is extensive the Judge should consider moving the Betta to the Multicolor class
3. Fish with a Butterfly pattern ( major fault). If the Butterfly pattern is extensive the Judge should consider moving the Betta to the Butterfly class.
4. Fish with 80% or more pastel or opaque base color (Disqualifying Fault) These should be moved to either the Pastel or Opaque class.



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Chapter 7: Class K (Metallic)

IBC Standard - Chapter 7: Class K

GROUP K -METALLIC BETTAS

The metallic effect is generated by the spread of yellow-reflecting chromatophores over the body and fins of a fish. Against a dark background, this effect interacts with normal green and blue iridescence to generate dark-bodied iridescent fish of striking and unconventional hues. When combined with blue iridescence, the resulting fish is blue-green to teal-colored; when combined with steel, the fish adopt that unique coloration often marketed under the name ‘copper’.

SUBGROUP --Dark-bodied Single Color Metallic

CATEGORY—Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque
Dark-bodied metallic fish are judged by the same criterion, as are dark-bodied iridescent fish. Specifically faults regarding to the spread of iridescence and absence of red or yellow pertain. Dark-body iridescent standards call for the iridescent color to extend as far forward on the fish as possible. The same standard applies to dark-bodied metallic fish, that is, iridescence covering the gill plates, head, and lips are favored in dark-bodied metallic fish and their absence faulted.
The dark-bodied metallic fish are often unusually variable in hue, ranging from a purplish ‘copper’, to a shiny steel, to blue-greens, to a teal blue. Uniformity of color over the body of the fish is ideal, so that a uniform teal blue color or uniform copper color would be preferred over a fish with patches that are green alternating with patches that are blue.
All general standards and special standards for dark-iridescent fish apply. Additional faults listed specific to the dark-bodied metallic Type are included.

TYPE – METALLIC COPPER (STEEL BLUE)
A deep shiny metallic copper color is desirable. Absence of all opaque is essential. Colors will vary in shade and hue from a new shiny copper penny to a darker color copper. Just like a true copper metal the spectrum of colors radiating back from a flashlight shined onto the fish will give you variations of purple, turquoise, blue and a pinkish purple. Given the fact that the known genetic background of this fish is derived from the steel blue color it will be referred to as “Copper” for clarification of it’s color type.



TYPE – METALLIC TEAL (BLUE)
A deep shiny metallic teal green is desirable. Absence of all opaque is essential. All general color faults for the iridescent green will apply to the metallic teal. The degree to which blue displays itself should be minimal. A greener teal shade is more desirable than a teal blue.

TYPE – METALLIC GREEN
A deep shiny emerald green is desirable. Unlike the grass green or common green, the metallic green should shine like an emerald. Absence of all opaque is essential. All general color faults for the iridescent greens will apply to the metallic green.



Color Faults for DARK SINGLE COLOR METALLIC
1. Gill plates and head display metallic sheen, but covering is incomplete (slight fault).
2. Metallic coloration uniform, but fading toward edges of unpaired fins (minor fault).
3. Head black, lacking metallic sheen (major fault).
4. Metallic coloration not of uniform hue (major fault).
5. Red wash (major fault).
6. Steel Metallic with presence of green color (major fault).
7. Steel Metallic with presence of blue color (minor fault).
8. Teal Metallic with presence of blue color (major fault).
9. Green metallic with presence of blue color (major fault).
10. Green Metallic with presence of black (major fault).
11. Metallic coloration not spread over entire fish (severe fault).
12. Absence of metallic coloration (disqualifying fault).

The degree to which any other colors display should be minimal and preferably not noticeable without the use of a flashlight. Judges should consider the amount of the color intrusion and may rate such from minor to severe based on the relativity to which it degrades the desirable color.

ALL OTHER DARK BODIED METALLIC COLORS SUCH AS BLACK OR PURPLE SHOULD BE SHOWN IN THE COLOR VARIATION CLASS.

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL AND SPECIAL FAULTS APPLY

SUBGROUP --Light-bodied Single Color Metallic

CATEGORY— Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque
The light-bodied metallic bettas include any solid light-bodied single color (i.e. yellow, clear, orange, pastel, and opaque) fish that exhibit a metallic sheen, over the entire fish-Ideal is spread of metallic sheen over the entire fish including the head (mask effect). Some slang names of these fish may include: platinum, silver, gold, and yellow gold. Metallic patterned fish (i.e., bicolors, butterflies, marbles) are to be shown in the regular patterned classes or in color form variations if the exhibitor believes the color of sufficient novelty.
All general, as well as special standards pertaining to the color, apply for the light-bodied metallics. In particular, a yellow fish is judged by the yellow color standard, an opaque by the opaque standard, and so on. Fish are judged by the adherence to the ideal of their type and judged relative to one another by their respective departure from those ideals, as well as their adherence to the light bodied metallic standard.
One notable exception to the special standards pertains. In the non-iridescent solid colors, i.e., clear, yellow and orange, the presence of iridescence is faulted. The metallic effect is also iridescent, so in light bodied metallic classes the standards regarding absence of iridescence is taken to mean absence of blue or green iridescence.

SUBGROUP CHARACTERISTIC = Absence of dark undercoating: Metallic Sheen

CATEGORY— Non-Iridescent Subcategory—Non-Opaque
Subcategory --Opaque
TYPE --YELLOW or GOLD METALLIC
The regular color standards for yellow will apply. A brilliant lemon yellow with a metallic sheen spread over the entire body is ideal. Pay special attention to the metallic sheen and make certain it is evenly spread over the fish. This type could easily be mistaken for Cambodian yellows as they also tend to show iridescence, which could be misconstrued for the metallic sheen.



TYPE – CLEAR METALLIC
The regular color standard for clear will apply. Transparent Body and Fins are ideal. The presence of any other color is a serious error. A clear metallic body will not appear pink as in the normal clear fish. The metallic sheen will shield the coloration from the body organs. They will appear very clear however their eyes will be dark as in the normal clear color.

TYPE – ORANGE METALLIC
A Bright true orange is the ideal color. The metallic orange would display a metallic sheen, which would make the orange appear richer in color. Imagine the wax effect on an orange color crayon and this would be very close to the ideal color desired.

Color Faults of Yellow/Clear/Orange Metallic
1. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but not extended over head (slight fault).
2. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but fading or darkening toward the unpaired fins (slight fault).
3. Yellow metallic with blue or green iridescence (major fault).
4. Yellow metallic with the yellow color not uniformly spread over entire fish (major fault).
5. Variation of yellow metallic color – bright to dull (major fault).
6. Clear metallic with presence of yellow fin rays (minor fault).
7. Clear metallic with occasional dark spotting on body or fins (minor fault).
8. Clear metallic with blue or green iridescence (major fault).
9. Clear metallic with presence of any red color (major fault).
10. Orange metallic with variations in shade of orange color (minor fault).
11. Orange metallic with blue of green iridescence (major fault).
12. Orange metallic with presence of red color (major fault).
13. Orange metallic with the orange color not uniformly spread over entire fish (major fault).
14. Metallic sheen present but not uniformly distributed over fish (major fault).
15. Presence of a dark undercoating (disqualifying fault).
16. Absence of metallic sheen (disqualifying fault).

TYPE – PASTEL METALLIC
The color standards for the regular pastel colors will apply. Colors include Pastel Blue, Green, White, Lavender, etc. All of these lack dark undercoloration. All of the permitted entries must be non-red and light bodied and must not show red or black undercoloration. Metallic pastels will show as shiny colors or as regular pastels. Presence of any dark body color is a disqualifying fault.



SUBTYPE – PASTEL BLUE METALLIC
A light shiny sky Blue is ideal. Pale blue coloration, lacking a dark or black undercoloration.

SUBTYPE – PASTEL GREEN METALLIC
A light shiny pale Green is ideal. Pale green coloration, lacking a dark or black undercoloration.

SUBTYPE – PASTEL WHITE METALLIC
A light shiny White is ideal. White coloration may vary in shade from Platinum White to Silver. Metallic white must not be confused with Opaque. This subtype should show as a clear fish with a metallic shine, which gives it the appearance of Metallic White.

Color Faults of Pastel Blue/Green/White Metallic
1. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but not extended over head (slight fault).
2. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but fading or darkening toward edges of the unpaired fins (slight fault).
3. Pastel Blue Metallic with variations in the shade of blue color (minor fault).
4. Pastel Blue Metallic with presence of green tones (major fault).
5. Pastel Green Metallic with variations in the shade of green color (minor fault).
6. Pastel Green Metallic with presence of blue tones (major fault).
7. Pastel White Metallic with the presence of blue or green tones (minor fault).
8. Pastel White Metallic with variations in the shade of the white color (minor fault).
9. Metallic sheen producing yellow fin rays (minor fault).
10. Metallic sheen present but not uniformly distributed over fish (major fault).
11. Absence of metallic sheen (disqualifying fault).

TYPE – METALLIC OPAQUE
The fish under this Category/subcategory are Opaques with a metallic sheen. All lack dark undercoloration, must be non-red and light bodied. They cannot show red or black undercoloration – must show opaque which covers the body. Colors include Blue, Green, and White. All general Opaque standards will also apply to the metallic opaques.
Typically Opaque refers to the build up of pigment over the body of the fish, which displays itself as a white or chalky coating. Uneven spread of the metallic iridescence will cause an opaque illusion on metallic fish. Particular attention should be paid to the extent of which the opaque presents itself on the entire body of the fish. An even spread is desirable.

SUBTYPE – METALLIC OPAQUE BLUE
A light shiny powder blue is ideal. Basically contains the same colors as the metallic pastels. However, a coat of Opaque pigment covers the fish. Pale Blue coloration, which appears to lack the typical dark or black undercoloration, is essential.

SUBTYPE – METALLIC OPAQUE GREEN
A light shiny powder green is ideal. Pale green coloration, lacking the typical dark or black undercoloration.

SUBTYPE – METALLIC OPAQUE WHITE
A brilliant shiny dense white color is ideal. White coloration, lacking the typical dark or black undercoloration.



Color Faults of Metallic Opaque
1. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but not extended over head (slight fault).
2. Metallic sheen uniform over fish, but fading toward edges of the unpaired fins (slight fault).
3. Variation in the shade of the color (minor fault).
4. Metallic sheen producing yellow fin rays (minor fault).
5. Presence of green tones on the metallic opaque blue (major fault).
6. Presence of blue tones on the metallic opaque green (major fault).
7. Presence of non-white tones on metallic opaque white (major fault).
8. Metallic sheen present but not uniformly distributed over fish (major fault).
9. Absence of metallic sheen (disqualifying fault).

ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL AND SPECIAL FAULTS APPLY

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Red1313

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Trail class Female plakat

IBC Standard - Trail class Female plakat

TRADITIONAL AND SHOW PLAKAT FEMALE BETTAS
Female Traditional and Show Plakat Bettas are of the same general form as their male counterparts, but with shorter fins and broader bodies.
The IBC encourages in this trial class the distinctive female Plakat form. Female Plakat Bettas vary considerably from males in several ways and should always appear "female."

1. Females are generally expected to be somewhat smaller overall. They are usually more rounded in the belly area than males.
2. Female fins are not expected to reach the same size or proportion of the male finnage.
3. The female Plakat is not expected to have the finnage of their longfin female counterparts. The dorsal is expected to be smaller.
4. The dorsal of a female plakat may open like a fan as in the male form.
5. The analfin will be shorter and may show an extended point at the tip of the fin.
6. Females are expected to show an egg spot.
7. Females may be more aggressive in their deportment than their longfin female counterparts.

ALL APPROPRIATE GENERAL AND SPECIAL FAULTS APPLY



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Ok that's it that's all from the IBC 2009 - 2010 Standards (to my knowledge).

Hope you guys find them useful (or at least interesting)
 
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