I need a fish to clean my gravel algae

blackmollylover4life

Member
Any fish i could get?
 
Best Answer - View MacZ's answer

Crimson_687

Member
The most effective algae eater is not fish, but a nerite snail
 

FishGirl38

Member
Its a tough sell and really depends. Most 'algae eaters' that are sold AS 'algae eaters' are mild algae grazers when they're babies (when you buy em at the store), but transfer their diet to an omnivore/scavenger diet as they reach adulthood (I'm talking pleco and chinese algae eaters mostly), most pleco will actually eat driftwood when they're older, and chinese algae eaters will take care of brown algae, but not much else.

Is the algae green, brown, or black?

The BEST *only algae* eating fish that I know exist (in order from best to most picky) are otocinclus, amano shrimp, and siamensis algae eaters (oh, nerite snails ARE a great option too, just gotta give them time to do their work), but there aren't many other options for 'cleaner fish' in a freshwater tank.

Do you hydrovac your tank when you do cleanings? and how often is the light on?
 

Crimson_687

Member
Otto cats are great algae eaters, but be comfortable with the fact they are wild caught in mass and may not thrive in an aquarium.

Edit: depending on the type of algae, the cause could just be an imbalance of nutrients or excess light. Diatoms, aka brown algae, will show up in new tanks and completely disappear after a few weeks.
 
  • Thread Starter

blackmollylover4life

Member
i don't know the type but it's brown and it's on my gravel
 

PerfectSatyr683

Member
Amano Shrimp are a good and hardy shrimp/ algae eater
 

FishGirl38

Member
blackmollylover4life said:
i don't know the type but it's brown and it's on my gravel
Is the tank a newer tank? Brown/Orange 'algae' usually shows up in new tanks, and should wipe right off. Most 'algae' eating fish will eat that. Have you cleaned the tank yet and do you use a gravel cleaner when you do? What size is the tank?
 

MacZ

Member
If it's on the gravel almost all but shrimp are out.
Otos are as mentioned almost always wild caught and won't live long and rarely thrive. Hillstream loaches need cold, clear and oxigen rich water and also won't pick the gravel clean. Nerite snails ditto with the gravel.

NOBODY NEEDS a fish to clean off algae. As FishGirl38 says, algae may prop up in a new tank and otherwise are a sign of too much nutrients and/or lighting hours. One should always try to get rid off algae by tweaking nutrients and/or light and/or adding live plants, before adding any additional animals or even using chemicals.

Also in a certain amount of the right kind, algae are a sign of an established tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

blackmollylover4life

Member
FishGirl38 said:
Is the tank a newer tank? Brown/Orange 'algae' usually shows up in new tanks, and should wipe right off. Most 'algae' eating fish will eat that. Have you cleaned the tank yet and do you use a gravel cleaner when you do? What size is the tank?
ya it is new
 

MacZ

Member
blackmollylover4life said:
ya it is new
The problem will most likely correct itself, then. May take some weeks, though. Fishkeeping needs patience.
 

CichlidCody

Member
You can't always rely on bottomfeeders for algae treatment, you need to find out the underlying issue as to why you have so much algae growth to begin with before it causes more issues.
 

MacZ

Member
CichlidCody said:
You can't always rely on bottomfeeders for algae treatment, you need to find out the underlying issue as to why you have so much algae growth to begin with before it causes more issues.
Without a picture we don't even know the extent of the algae. Otherwise: Agree 100%.
 

FishGirl38

Member
I wouldn't do anything about it. If it's bothering you, you could move the top layer of gravel around with a sponge, but it should go away on its own overtime. Adding fish technically, puts more waste in the tank which, will contribute to algae growth later on. It won't hurt your fish at all, its just a little unsightly. But again, once everything balances out, that should stop growing and go away.

at that point, your 'algae' might be a green color, and will be proportional to the amounts of waste chems in the tank [nitrate and phosphate] and the photo periods [recommended 8hrs on, 16hrs off], SO, in the future, when you see algae growth - instead of adding anything, do a water change and turn the light down [or off] for longer periods of time.

EDIT: since this tank is a new tank, doing a water change won't help the algae because you haven't grown enough waste chemicals to feed it to where it causes problems. This 'brown' type of algae is different, and has to do with the aquarium cycling and balancing out. Which is why I say to do nothing as of now, you'll want to wait until the tank cycles (or until your ammonia/nitrite spikes higher than .5ppm - which, you don't WANT, this is toxic, ideally you want to keep everything below these concentrations during cycling, W/C during cycling is for emergency only) before you do a water change.
 
  • Thread Starter

blackmollylover4life

Member
FishGirl38 said:
I wouldn't do anything about it. If it's bothering you, you could move the top layer of gravel around with a sponge, but it should go away on its own overtime. Adding fish technically, puts more waste in the tank which, will contribute to algae growth later on. It won't hurt your fish at all, its just a little unsightly. But again, once everything balances out, that should stop growing and go away.

at that point, your 'algae' might be a green color, and will be proportional to the amounts of waste chems in the tank [nitrate and phosphate] and the photo periods [recommended 8hrs on, 16hrs off], SO, in the future, when you see algae growth - instead of adding anything, do a water change and turn the light down [or off] for longer periods of time.

EDIT: since this tank is a new tank, doing a water change won't help the algae because you haven't grown enough waste chemicals to feed it to where it causes problems. This 'brown' type of algae is different, and has to do with the aquarium cycling and balancing out. Which is why I say to do nothing as of now, you'll want to wait until the tank cycles (or until your ammonia/nitrite spikes higher than .5ppm) before you do a water change.
ok
 

kallililly1973

Member
Siphonius hosius AKA a gravel vac
 
  • Thread Starter

blackmollylover4life

Member
i just recently asked this and a good idea might be shrimp but if your tank is new it should go away over time.
 

MacZ

Member
blackmollylover4life said:
i just recently asked this and a good idea might be shrimp but if your tank is new it should go away over time.
You are aware you just answered to your own thread?
 
  • Thread Starter

blackmollylover4life

Member
MacZ said:
You are aware you just answered to your own thread?
i thought i saw someone else asked the question so i responded with what you guys helped me with but put it on this thread my bad
 

MacZ

Member
blackmollylover4life said:
i thought i saw someone else asked the question so i responded with what you guys helped me with but put it on this thread my bad
No need to apologize.
 
Top Bottom