I Made A Rookie Mistake

Copingwithpods

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I bought corals that were so cheap I couldn't pass them up, problem is I didn't read up on them first and wasn't entirely sure of what they were.

First guy I thought was an elegance coral, store was very dimly lit and I couldnt really tell as it had just been moved and closed up. Now that it's in my tank it looks a lot different.
20190622_180245_HDR.jpg


The second is a mettalic blue red tipped flower pot coral. I thought it was a zoa colony(big mistake) now I have one coral I know nothing about and another doomed to die in six months or so says the interwebs.

Any idea what this coral is will be greatly appreciated
 

stella1979

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Hmm, are both the corals in the picture above the new ones you speak of?

Ermm, I wanna say that I wouldn't shop there again, but with the right knowledge and soon to be had experience under your belt, you may have found a place with great deals if ignorant employees.

Going on the assumption that the bushy, many-tentacled coral is the flower pot... the common name 'flower pot' means Alveapora to me (not what you have there), though the term is commonly used for Goniopora corals as well, (your coral doesn't look like a Goni to me either.) I'm not sure at all but if I were to make a guess on this coral, it would be Galaxea, (aka, Galaxy Coral, Star Coral, Starburst Coral...) I love these guys though I should point out their aggression. I've got a neon tipped galaxea that looks like a bright, cute little dome-shaped bush, only a couple inches across and not more than 1.5 inches tall.... until it lets out one of its stingers. Thin as a thread, this baddy gets at least 7 inches long and waves around looking for something to harass. I've read credible reports of how nasty the sting can be too.

Hmmm, my hammer corals send out long stingers sometimes too. This is not how these corals eat though. It is said that these stingers are sent out when a coral senses encroachment. It is their way of defending their space. My hammer's stingers have caused a little damage to nearby corals, namely, two varieties of leptoseris (strange SPS corals... strange because they are SPS but do very well in low-light conditions, hence, the reason this SPS is within reach of a low-lying hammer, while most of my LPS is up top and out of harm's way.) Point is, the leptos took damage but recovered just fine after some time. I hear that a galaxea's sting is much more potent... so my guy is in the sand and the flow in my little tank seems to keep his stingers away from the main scape and the corals that reside there. Fun fact... a galaxea, unlike so many other LPS, grows its skeleton like a plate, which makes it just fine for it to reside in the sand. Personally, I think frag plugs belong nowhere but the frag rack... in other words, I deplug corals before they go to their final spot because I do not want plugs visible on the scape... nor do I want to see them in the substrate. This is just me and totally not hating on others btw. Point is, my galaxea is the only coral that is part of the grand design which is still on a plug... His thin skeleton made it feel too dangerous to deplug him, but no matter, he soon grew, plating down the sides of, then away from the plug in all directions. Sooo, if I pick up that coral and turn it upside down, the bottom of the disc part of the plug is perfectly even with the bottom of the galaxea's skeleton.

As for the coral to the right in the pic, (err, I have a feeling you aren't even asking about this one, but just in case), you've got a very nicely colored trumpet coral there... aka, a candy cane. These are commonly bright yellow/green (the morph is called Kryptonite Candy Cane), or a soft bluish shade. Idk if it's rare everywhere, but I've never seen a two-tone trumpet at my LFS's. I really like this guy.

Either way, I see no evidence of an elegance coral. Tell me, does it have a stony base? I ask because it also looks a bit like a fluffy but mostly closed flower anemone... which has no skeleton and can move itself around. I do not think this is really what you have there, but again, just in case... so I thought to mention this critter's mobility because a roaming nem is a cause for concern. Nems have a wicked sting that can hurt other corals as the nem moves near, past, or over them.

Errmm, sorry for the book! I'm bad about keeping things short. Hope this helps! And please, do share more of your tank and corals with us.
 

Wraithen

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Hmm, are both the corals in the picture above the new ones you speak of?

Ermm, I wanna say that I wouldn't shop there again, but with the right knowledge and soon to be had experience under your belt, you may have found a place with great deals if ignorant employees.

Going on the assumption that the bushy, many-tentacled coral is the flower pot... the common name 'flower pot' means Alveapora to me (not what you have there), though the term is commonly used for Goniopora corals as well, (your coral doesn't look like a Goni to me either.) I'm not sure at all but if I were to make a guess on this coral, it would be Galaxea, (aka, Galaxy Coral, Star Coral, Starburst Coral...) I love these guys though I should point out their aggression. I've got a neon tipped galaxea that looks like a bright, cute little dome-shaped bush, only a couple inches across and not more than 1.5 inches tall.... until it lets out one of its stingers. Thin as a thread, this baddy gets at least 7 inches long and waves around looking for something to harass. I've read credible reports of how nasty the sting can be too.

Hmmm, my hammer corals send out long stingers sometimes too. This is not how these corals eat though. It is said that these stingers are sent out when a coral senses encroachment. It is their way of defending their space. My hammer's stingers have caused a little damage to nearby corals, namely, two varieties of leptoseris (strange SPS corals... strange because they are SPS but do very well in low-light conditions, hence, the reason this SPS is within reach of a low-lying hammer, while most of my LPS is up top and out of harm's way.) Point is, the leptos took damage but recovered just fine after some time. I hear that a galaxea's sting is much more potent... so my guy is in the sand and the flow in my little tank seems to keep his stingers away from the main scape and the corals that reside there. Fun fact... a galaxea, unlike so many other LPS, grows its skeleton like a plate, which makes it just fine for it to reside in the sand. Personally, I think frag plugs belong nowhere but the frag rack... in other words, I deplug corals before they go to their final spot because I do not want plugs visible on the scape... nor do I want to see them in the substrate. This is just me and totally not hating on others btw. Point is, my galaxea is the only coral that is part of the grand design which is still on a plug... His thin skeleton made it feel too dangerous to deplug him, but no matter, he soon grew, plating down the sides of, then away from the plug in all directions. Sooo, if I pick up that coral and turn it upside down, the bottom of the disc part of the plug is perfectly even with the bottom of the galaxea's skeleton.

As for the coral to the right in the pic, (err, I have a feeling you aren't even asking about this one, but just in case), you've got a very nicely colored trumpet coral there... aka, a candy cane. These are commonly bright yellow/green (the morph is called Kryptonite Candy Cane), or a soft bluish shade. Idk if it's rare everywhere, but I've never seen a two-tone trumpet at my LFS's. I really like this guy.

Either way, I see no evidence of an elegance coral. Tell me, does it have a stony base? I ask because it also looks a bit like a fluffy but mostly closed flower anemone... which has no skeleton and can move itself around. I do not think this is really what you have there, but again, just in case... so I thought to mention this critter's mobility because a roaming nem is a cause for concern. Nems have a wicked sting that can hurt other corals as the nem moves near, past, or over them.

Errmm, sorry for the book! I'm bad about keeping things short. Hope this helps! And please, do share more of your tank and corals with us.
Ok, after you say all of that, I REALLY wish the picture wasn't broken, and that I was allowed to keep another tank.
 
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Copingwithpods

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Thanks so much! I'm really hoping it's a galaxia.

I'm finding it extremely difficult to take good pictures under my lights so bare with me these are the best ones I got.

Here is the one I'm pretty sure is a flowerpot
https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194907_HDR.jpg.html
He looks really nice but if he is indeed a flower pot I very much doubt I'll keep him for long.


And here is the mystery one.
https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194857_HDR.jpg.html

It looks like it's encrusting as its edges are rough unlike let's say green star polyps which have soft edges. The pictures really don't do this guy justice, he is a beautiful mettalic blue/green color.

These corals just went in my tank and I'd love to know everything about them so I can best take care of them.

Bonus round.

Picked up these red zoas not realizing they were growing on a clam/mussle? At full extension the clam was completely covered. Unfortunately I had to do some pretty aggressive dipping on this guy as it was covered in hitchhikers so they are understandably pretty stressed out. Not sure if I'm keeping this giant hitchhiker. https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194933.jpg.html



So far I'm keeping everyone on their plugs as I experiment with placement trying to dial in where in the tank they are happiest. When I finally figure that out I'll remove them and glue them down for good.
 

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Ok, after you say all of that, I REALLY wish the picture wasn't broken, and that I was allowed to keep another tank.
Aww, I'm sorry to hear that the image appears broken to you Wraithen. We just got past that ALL PICS BROKEN scenario, so this is a little worrying... but the pics appear fine for me and look to be hosted on Photobucket (in case that helps at all.)

Thanks so much! I'm really hoping it's a galaxia.

I'm finding it extremely difficult to take good pictures under my lights so bare with me these are the best ones I got.

Here is the one I'm pretty sure is a flowerpot
https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194907_HDR.jpg.html
He looks really nice but if he is indeed a flower pot I very much doubt I'll keep him for long.


And here is the mystery one.
https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194857_HDR.jpg.html

It looks like it's encrusting as its edges are rough unlike let's say green star polyps which have soft edges. The pictures really don't do this guy justice, he is a beautiful mettalic blue/green color.

These corals just went in my tank and I'd love to know everything about them so I can best take care of them.

Bonus round.

Picked up these red zoas not realizing they were growing on a clam/mussle? At full extension the clam was completely covered. Unfortunately I had to do some pretty aggressive dipping on this guy as it was covered in hitchhikers so they are understandably pretty stressed out. Not sure if I'm keeping this giant hitchhiker. https://s1264.photobucket.com/user/riderinblack57/media/aquarium/20190622_194933.jpg.html



So far I'm keeping everyone on their plugs as I experiment with placement trying to dial in where in the tank they are happiest. When I finally figure that out I'll remove them and glue them down for good.
Your flower pot is definitely a goniopora. I wish you luck with it though I know how you feel. Wish I was more informed to use the correct terminology here but... I'm not. I'll give it a try anyway. To the layman, it appears that there are two varieties of gonis, those which have long 'necks' leading up to the flower, which would be more accurately called stalks. These flowers appear to have stems which allow the 'bloom' to wave around a bit in the flow. We also have what you've got, which idk what to call, but they have no necks/stalks/stems so are a flatter variety. I've seen the proper names for these two gonis, but can't remember! Anyhow, sorry to say that I've seen more success with the long neck variety, though not everyone fails with the shorties. So, I'll say, maintain stability in every way you can, and I wish you luck!

The mystery still looks galaxea-like to me. I've not seen one that color before so... I hope this hardy coral does well for you and that you someday make a nice return on frags. Here's a real potato quality pic of my own galaxea... it doesn't really do him justice either and I totally get where you're coming from with difficulty taking reef pics!
20190527_195247_HDR.jpg

Behind him, on the left, you can see one of my acans but I'm wanting to point out that orangey guy behind the galaxea on the right... That's one of my leptos and right next to him is another lepto, green with lavender markings (officially, an Incredible Hulk Leptoseris, lol.) These are those strange low-light SPS that have taken hits from my hammers. You can still see evidence of it in the white areas on orange dude. When Galaxy lets loose one of his long stingers, they tend to reach straight up and move to where the flow takes them. I have a 20g long with wavemakers on both short sides, so luckily, this contrasting flow pattern looks to keep those nasty stingers away from the rockscape that the Galaxy is not too far from. Anyway, just an FYI so you'll think about where you place yours.

Bahahaha... my very first zoas came with a clam too! A little guy, probably not even an inch wide. I liked him so let him stay and found great joy in seeing him open sometimes. I had the worst trouble with zoas in the early days so... those zoas died, but the clam remained. He managed to attach himself to the main scape while the little zoa rock he came on was placed right up against the rock, (in an effort to get the zoas to colonize onto the rock... which didn't happen.) My hammers are in that area now and I do believe the clam still resides there, hidden by the hammers during the day when they're open. Haven't seen much of him in quite a while but he never hurt anything and I hope he's still kickin'.
 

Wraithen

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Aww, I'm sorry to hear that the image appears broken to you Wraithen. We just got past that ALL PICS BROKEN scenario, so this is a little worrying... but the pics appear fine for me and look to be hosted on Photobucket (in case that helps at all.)
I'm on the app. I logged into the desktop version on my phone and it loads the pictures just fine. Sorry for the sidetrack!
 
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Copingwithpods

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Been looking at galaxea pictures and none of them really match the little guy I have specially the color and polyp formation. If not a galaxea anything else it could be?
 

stella1979

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The color really throws me too, and the little tentacles look a bit fat for a Galaxea, so, I was never sure. Gonna call on one of my best buddies here, who is not only an excellent reefer but also works for a great LFS, so gets lots of exposure and experience outside of his own tank. Think maybe he's our best bet.

Oh @Culprit
 

stella1979

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Nice @coralbandit With the first pic I also thought it looked like a shorty Duncan, and then forgot. Oooh, I hope it is because, despite my love for my little acros and such, the Duncan is my favorite for his similar look and movement, but not the mobility of a nem, because mine is one of my oldest so has survived my own mistakes and a lil natural disaster in the looong power outage after Hurricane Irma (aka, Duncans are super hardy), and because they're fun to feed. So, a gorgeous, hardy, and fun coral that's perfect for newbs is highly deserving of a top spot.
 
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Thank you so much guys for helping me figure this out. All day I've been hitting Google hard and after following a few rabbit holes I came across this
Collage%202019-06-23%2015_54_49.jpg


A whisker coral, a type of Duncan from Australia. The color does scream Duncan but my mystery guy doesn't have a pronounce oral disk, at least not one I can see. I can't really tell where one polyp ends and the other begins. Thoughts? How wrong am I?
 
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Copingwithpods

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Here's a better picture now that it's a little happier.

It seams to be doing great, the cup coral not so much though
 

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I can't really tell from the pictures, is it multiple completely seperate polyps or one big one? To me it almost looks like a mad Elegance coral. However if it is seperate polyps I would think a Duncanopsammia aka Duncan or whisker coral.
 
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I believe I can see multiple mouths but the tentacles don't complete a circle like on a normal polyp.

Does an elegance retreat into its base with multiple polyps or is it more of a mushroom with one large fleshy polyp?

Mystery solved, it's a mettalic blue horn coral(Hydnophora pilosa)

From my readings it's an encrusting sps. Wasn't really ready for sps but he is doing great so far with great polyp extension
 
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