Hydroponics Science Project

PacificSailfinTang

Science Project

HI all! I'm not really sure where to put this, but I figured this was as good as a place as any. In my AP physics class we're doing an independent research project, and I can do it on anything. So I thought what's better than fish?! Anyways, I was thinking I would do a hydroponics project.

I need help with tank size and the type of fish/terrestrial plant. It needs to be fairly inexpensive, and I'm fine with small daily water changes. My problem is finding a high-waste level fish that can be housed in a 10 gallon tank for over a month. Each tank will have no substrate, and anywhere from 0-3 fish. Each tank will be getting the same amount of light and food. The fish would either be returned, or housed in a bigger tank when I'm done with this experiment.

Thanks for ideas in advance.


 

Wideload

Not Recommended IMO.

The only type of fish I can see working for this is a large commet goldfish I mean the feeder's petco & petsmart sell. They would be mass waste producers but you would need someone with a pond or very large cold water tank after your experiment.

Would there be filtration on these tanks would they be cycled?

Sorry not much help.
 

matsungit

If keeping it as a pet is not that important to you then you can buy live fish that are meant for consumption like channel cat fish fry or tilapia fry. They are very likely to produce a large bioload. When you are done you can raise them in a large plastic tub and eat them when they are big enough. Another advantage is that they are hardy from being commercially bred.
 

Danjamesdixon

A nice idea in principle. But these are live animals - not science projects.

You'll need to learn about their needs and care on top of learning how an Aquaponics system works (Hydroponics refers to just growing plants without soil, not using animals to fertilize them), and keeping fish is not a simple uptaking.

I've not seen Aquaponics work on such a small scale before, and I likely never will. On larger scales, it can be sustained, but not at desktop level. It has been tried many times before and, as far as i've seen, not been successful.

I'm not trying to sound like a naysayer here, but I actually attempted to design a home Aquaponics kit during my second year of university studying Product Design. Making the system that small proved infeasible, and the final outcome ended up as a Hydroponics kit instead.
 

PacificSailfinTang

Not Recommended IMO.

The only type of fish I can see working for this is a large commet goldfish I mean the feeder's petco & petsmart sell. They would be mass waste producers but you would need someone with a pond or very large cold water tank after your experiment.

Would there be filtration on these tanks would they be cycled?

Sorry not much help.

Some feeder Goldie's might work then. I have a private pond in my yard that has goldfish in it already.




If keeping it as a pet is not that important to you then you can buy live fish that are meant for consumption like channel cat fish fry or tilapia fry. They are very likely to produce a large bioload. When you are done you can raise them in a large plastic tub and eat them when they are big enough. Another advantage is that they are hardy from being commercially bred.

I'll look into that a little.. I take it this might also work with a species of dwarf sun fish?




A nice idea in principle. But these are live animals - not science projects.

You'll need to learn about their needs and care on top of learning how an Aquaponics system works (Hydroponics refers to just growing plants without soil, not using animals to fertilize them), and keeping fish is not a simple uptaking.

I've not seen Aquaponics work on such a small scale before, and I likely never will. On larger scales, it can be sustained, but not at desktop level. It has been tried many times before and, as far as i've seen, not been successful.

I'm not trying to sound like a naysayer here, but I actually attempted to design a home Aquaponics kit during my second year of university studying Product Design. Making the system that small proved infeasible, and the final outcome ended up as a Hydroponics kit instead.

I am fully aware of this. They'd be in the smaller tanks for the duration of the experiment. Then depending on what species I pick they'd go in my outdoor pond or a bigger tank.

This would not be my first time taking care of fish. I currently have three tanks up and running at the moment.

Thanks for clearing the Aquaponics/Hydroponics thing up for me

No, thank you for your opinion. Maybe a drum or something of the sort would work better? Any ideas?


 

Danjamesdixon

Then depending on what species I pick they'd go in my outdoor pond or a bigger tank.

This would not be my first time taking care of fish. I currently have three tanks up and running at the moment.

That's certainly great to hear.

The main problem I ran into was finding a fish that created enough waste to provide sufficient Nutrients for the plants above, that could fit into a tank small enough to warrant keeping in a domestic environment.

One particularly good case study of products that have not succeeded include the Back to the Roots Home Aquaponics Kit - low quality equipment and lack of research into species care informing design outcomes were the problems with that.

Generally, large waste producers like Goldfish, Catfish, Largemouth Bass and Koi are used in industrial Aquaponics systems - obviously, these cannot be housed in a domestic aquarium.
 

PacificSailfinTang

I've been reading around a bit... And discovered that rubber maid container aquariums are an actual thing. By using rubber maids I could potentially up the gallons of each space to 30-40. Ten gallons and rubber maids run about the same cost, so I wouldn't be spending a lot more money. Thoughts?


 

Aster

Does it absolutely have to be a 10 gallon?

You'd have many more options if it were like >30 gallons.
 

Flowingfins

You would have to put supports around the rubbermaid if you were to use it. Otherwise the water will make it bow out.


 

PacificSailfinTang

You would have to put supports around the rubbermaid if you were to use it. Otherwise the water will make it bow out.

I could do the supports. I'm thinking this idea might be a lot better for both me and the fish


 

Flowingfins

I used some as temporary tanks, they worked well.


 

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