Hydra?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish and Invertebrates' started by fishcrazy99, Jul 29, 2015.

  1. fishcrazy99Well Known MemberMember

    What is this? Its on my corkscrew val. ImageUploadedByFish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum1438205549.803645.jpg


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  2. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    That does actually look like hydra...


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  3. chromedome52Fishlore VIPMember

    Yep, that's Hydra!
     
  4. fishcrazy99Well Known MemberMember

    I have no idea how it got in! I have t added plants in a long time. Not fish or anything. Only new thing is some pothos growing out the top. Should i remove it? How do you even


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  5. AquaticBrandonWell Known MemberMember

    I think I've heard of people using a product called Fenbendazole to get rid of hydra and planaria. I had some in my tank but it eventually went away.


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  6. Dom90Fishlore VIPMember

    Uhh, fenbendazole is the main ingredient in dog de wormer....


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  7. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    That makes sense for something that removes planaria since it's a type of tapeworm. Hydra I don't know though. I've forgotten exactly where that sits on the evolutionary tree.


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  8. Dom90Fishlore VIPMember

    Yea but fenbendazole can be toxic... Would it be safe to put into an aquarium? Even a dose more than recommended for dogs is considered fatal.


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  9. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    True. It's probably a low concentration then. Also, dogs and fish are VERY different. But even though I am a biology major, I do not know enough specifics on the substance to let you know whether or not it is truly aquarium safe.


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  10. AquaticBrandonWell Known MemberMember

    I haven't used that. But I have read that many fish keepers have used it before and it had worked.
    Edit: here is a link
     


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  11. fishcrazy99Well Known MemberMember

    Hmmm would it be bad to just leave it? Will more grow? What are they eating? I eventually want to breed my peacock gudgeons in that tank but thats down the road


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  12. chromedome52Fishlore VIPMember

    Well, you're not going to breed Peacock Gudgeons with Hydra in the tank. Not sure if they are still available, but Fluke Tabs are my preferred treatment for Hydra. Supposedly there are fish that will eat them, but that won't give you a 100% kill rate.

    I believe fenbendazole is the medication in Fluke Tabs, but the bottle has a full chemical formulation that I'm not sure about. I've used FT in proper dosage with very small fish fry. It wiped out the Hydra without losing a single fry.

    Hydra can remain encysted for years, and pop out whenever appropriately sized food is available. Usually a bacterial bloom or the use of live brine shrimp nauplii triggers their appearance.
     
  13. fishcrazy99Well Known MemberMember

    So i ended up cutting that piece of my plant off to get rid of it and when i looked at it outside the tank the strands were green. Dont think it was hydra


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  14. kidster9700Well Known MemberMember

    Any idea what it is then?


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  15. oOBlueOoWell Known MemberMember

    There's a product called fishbendazole from foster&smith that work good. I can't remember the exact dosage.

    Hydra can appear green sometimes.
     
  16. chromedome52Fishlore VIPMember

    Some Hydra form a symbiotic relationship with a type of algae, which lives inside their body. This gives them a green color. It also makes it nearly impossible to simply starve them out.

    The fact that you removed some of them does not mean they've been removed from the tank. Odds are there are more in there that you simply haven't seen yet. I would treat the tank.
     
  17. JsigmoWell Known MemberMember

    Interesting!
     
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