How young do stores sell bettas? How to tell rough age of betta?

Masspanic

In the near future, I'd like to get a betta that is: 1) female, 2) young, and 3) docile (plan is to be housed with pygmy cories). My question is: Does anyone know at what age pet stores get bettas in at? Is there a way I could possibly tell the approximate age of the betta by examining it? I don't want to buy from an online vendor as I'd want to see the actual fish or a picture of it first and it would likely be much more expensive.
 

jkkgron2

Your best bet would be asking the employees who work there. Usually bettas are around 4-12 months old when their sold. But, While there are a few signs of an older betta like a hunched back, less color, and just overall being inactive, There’s no guarantee you’ll be able to tell the age. You could also try getting a baby betta from petco. It might end up being a male, but then it’d grow up with the corys and will be less likely to see them as a threat.
 
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Masspanic

Your best bet would be asking the employees who work there. Usually bettas are around 4-12 months old when their sold. But, While there are a few signs of an older betta like a hunched back, less color, and just overall being inactive, There’s no guarantee you’ll be able to tell the age. You could also try getting a baby betta from petco. It might end up being a male, but then it’d grow up with the corys and will be less likely to see them as a threat.
Thank you that helps! Don’t have a petco near me though :/ I’ll check with the pet store I go to and see if they ever have baby ones/if they know how old their bettas are
 
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RayClem

About three months after birth, a betta will be sexually mature. Males will need to be separated from each other and from females shortly before this age. They will continue to grow until they are about a year old.

It used to be that bettas (both male and female) were sold when they were nearly full grown. That way, their appearance is at its finest. However, I have noticed a recent trend towards selling fish at an ever younger age. Some are even sold as "baby boy" and "baby girl" bettas. They might be 4 months old. The problem with purchasing very young bettas is that they may not show their true "colors". For example, there was a thread on here a couple of months ago from a betta owner who had purchased a young "half-moon" betta. As the betta got older, the fins started to fray and the owner was concerned their fish might have tail rot. However, there were no other symptoms of disease, so forum members concluded that the betta was most likely a crowntail who was so young when purchased that it looked like a half-moon. As it matured, its fins developed the crowntail characteristics.

Thus, if you do purchase a very young betta, be aware that its appearance may change somewhat as it matures.
 
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BigManAquatics

Your best bet would be asking the employees who work there. Usually bettas are around 4-12 months old when their sold. But, While there are a few signs of an older betta like a hunched back, less color, and just overall being inactive, There’s no guarantee you’ll be able to tell the age. You could also try getting a baby betta from petco. It might end up being a male, but then it’d grow up with the corys and will be less likely to see them as a threat.
Yeah he nailed it. Bettas are usually older, closer to a year when in stores because it takes awhile for their colors to display.
 
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Masspanic

About three months after birth, a betta will be sexually mature. Males will need to be separated from each other and from females shortly before this age. They will continue to grow until they are about a year old.

It used to be that bettas (both male and female) were sold when they were nearly full grown. That way, their appearance is at its finest. However, I have noticed a recent trend towards selling fish at an ever younger age. Some are even sold as "baby boy" and "baby girl" bettas. They might be 4 months old. The problem with purchasing very young bettas is that they may not show their true "colors". For example, there was a thread on here a couple of months ago from a betta owner who had purchased a young "half-moon" betta. As the betta got older, the fins started to fray and the owner was concerned their fish might have tail rot. However, there were no other symptoms of disease, so forum members concluded that the betta was most likely a crowntail who was so young when purchased that it looked like a half-moon. As it matured, its fins developed the crowntail characteristics.

Thus, if you do purchase a very young betta, be aware that its appearance may change somewhat as it matures.
Good to know! Thanks
 
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