How to raise then maintain the PH?

Roboticsbede

I want to get a new nerite tank with some shrimp, however my ph out of my tap water is around 6.5 with water flow (without plants to absorb CO2 yet), other than using crushed corals or using baking soda to raise the ph are there other methods? And even so I'm not really sure on how to maintain the ph after I have raised it, since Nerites need a ph of 7.0 and above.
 

GlennO

Is there a problem with using crushed corals or other types of limestone?
 
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Kelly2020

I have a cichlids tank and my water out of tap is the same as yours. I use crushed coral and never have a problem. My PH sits at 8.2.
 
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Roboticsbede

I have a cichlids tank and my water out of tap is the same as yours. I use crushed coral and never have a problem. My PH sits at 8.2.
I'm just a beginner, so how do you maintain it, meaning you can just add your tap water and it will never go down? Or like do you need to add crushed coral everytime?
 
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e_watson09

Most people who need to keep their pH like that will put crushed coral in the filter in a media bag. This will maintain the pH over time and ensure there isn't a big swing. Personally I've never done it but that's my understanding of it.
 
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wishuponafish

Just mix it in your substrate or put it in your filter and you're set for several months/years.
 
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Frank the Fish guy

I use a substrate of crush coral AND I add a second filter that is just crushed coral to keep the water circulating over it.

When removing water and adding water to replenish, I add salt and buffers to bring the pH and hardness up to where I want. I use Sechem Lake Salt, and Tanganyika Buffer. My fish are happy and breed.

But some folks use Ocean salt, and bicarbonate of soda for the buffer.

I have a pH of 8.5 and keep African Cichlids in this tank.

When you add the salt, the pH does not change. the hardness increases though. Adding buffer raises the pH and also makes it more stable and resistant to change.

The key to a stable pH is to have high buffer levels in the water. The buffers stabilize the pH.

Buffers get used-up by chemical reactions in the tank that take place naturally. By having the water in contact with the crushed coral, the buffers can dissolve back into the water naturally so you don't run out and don't have to keep adding the buffer. It is a very slow process, so you can't use the crushed coral to buffer the new water. You have to dissolve the buffers in the new water to match the pH of the tank.
 
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