How to raise gH without kH/pH

Angelfish1

I’ve heard of seachem equilibrium doing this but it would be wayy too expensive fir the amount I need. Are there other ways I can
achieve it? Are there any permanent ways?

My planted tank has a pH of 7.8, with dkh at 5 and dgh at 2-3 and I want to raise the dgh to 8/10.
My other tank is a shell dweller tank and has a pH of 7.8, with dkh at 10 and dgh at 2-3 and I want to raise the dgh to at least 10+. For this tank I’m using crushed coral since they can handle a higher ph
 

Bwood22

1 tablespoon of epsom salt per 20 gallons of water will get you close to where you want to be and its good for your Africans. Just test your GH and adjust the amount accordingly. I add some with each water change.

Epsom salt is cheap.
 
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John58ford

Epsom salt is MgSO4(magnesium sulfate), it will raise the dgh without affecting the kH, but it does it by only raising the magnesium content. I use it in one of my buffer mixes and it is safe.

GH is made up mostly of calcium and magnesium, usually in a higher amount of calcium. If you want to raise it more evenly, calcium chloride (CaCl2) is also commonly available as a pool product, or as a wine making supply. I also use this in my buffers and it is safe.

For the shell dweller tank, potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3 available in brewing/wine making supplies) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 aka baking soda) can bump the kH as high as you want it. Either alone at the numbers we run Tanganyika tanks at would cause an imbalance of too much sodium, or potassium.

Try looking at these chemicals and the results on rotalabutterfly.com, it has a great calculator for diy dry dosing in any given tank size. All of these ingredients can arguably be viewed as better to your plants as well at the right ratio so keep track of the excess nutrients you are supplying as you come up with your mix.
 
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MacZ

My other tank is a shell dweller tank and has a pH of 7.8, with dkh at 10 and dgh at 2-3 and I want to raise the dgh to at least 10+.
That pH is actually a bit on the low end for Tanganyikans. I'd try to keep it just above 8.

Is the tank sufficiently aerated for maximum removal of CO2?
 
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Angelfish1

That pH is actually a bit on the low end for Tanganyikans. I'd try to keep it just above 8.

Is the tank sufficiently aerated for maximum removal of CO2?
I don’t have an aerator in the tank. The tank is really high so the bubble makers aren’t able to produce bubbles because of the pressure. I already added crushed coral in the tank (1/1.5 lb) to also raise the pH. However, I don’t know if it’ll be enough to raise the dgh without raising the pH drastically so that’s why I was asking for that tank too.
 
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MacZ

I don’t have an aerator in the tank. The tank is really high so the bubble makers aren’t able to produce bubbles because of the pressure. I already added crushed coral in the tank (1/1.5 lb) to also raise the pH. However, I don’t know if it’ll be enough to raise the dgh without raising the pH drastically so that’s why I was asking for that tank too.
I was more referring to surface agitation in general. Like with a streaming pump or the filteroutlet.
Driving out CO2 can raise pH quite a bit and considering your readings I would definitely consider this.
 
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