Question How To Grow Monte Carlo

Yyot

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Hello everyone,

I want to grow Monte Carlo semi emerged and would like any tips. One of my LFS does it and has a tank where they grow it on the floor of the tank using what I think is eco complete (or something similar).

They’re closed during a state non-mandatory business order so I can’t really ask them. I have 3 cultures to get started with. Thanks!
 

-Mak-

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Hi! Are the 3 cultures you have tissue culture?

I find monte carlo quite easy to grow emersed.
What I do is get a container, Tupperware, something that is transparent and you can put cling wrap over.
Fill the bottom with an inch or two of soil based substrate. I use whatever leftover potting soil I have laying around because it's cheap, but you can also use aquasoil. I personally would not use eco complete because it doesn't contain some important macronutrients and in the case of emersed, the main method of nutrient uptake will be through roots.

Mix some water in to completely saturate the substrate. Watery mud consistency is good, but don't mix any aqua soils if you want to reuse it, it'll break apart. Let the mud settle and come back to it, you may find that it has absorbed all the water and needs more, or maybe it's just enough. You don't want too much water or else plants will sink into it.

Lay the plants down horizontally in very small clumps or as individual stems. The mud should be watery enough that they sink into it enough to always be wet and moist, but not so watery that they sink in and you can't see them anymore. They should "float" on the surface of the mud. Once this is done, cling wrap, poke some holes for air exchange, and leave it in a sunny area. I like to remove the cling wrap, fan them, and spray them with water at least once a day to keep air exchange up and prevent mold.

Water will evaporate and should keep the humidity inside the container close to 100%. Over time, new growth should be in emersed form and may tolerate slightly lower humidity, but I don't think they'll ever be able to tolerate an open container. Overall this is super low maintenance and will work for stem plants too :)
 
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Yyot

Yyot

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-Mak- said:
Hi! Are the 3 cultures you have tissue culture?

I find monte carlo quite easy to grow emersed.
What I do is get a container, Tupperware, something that is transparent and you can put cling wrap over.
Fill the bottom with an inch or two of soil based substrate. I use whatever leftover potting soil I have laying around because it's cheap, but you can also use aquasoil. I personally would not use eco complete because it doesn't contain some important macronutrients and in the case of emersed, the main method of nutrient uptake will be through roots.

Mix some water in to completely saturate the substrate. Watery mud consistency is good, but don't mix any aqua soils if you want to reuse it, it'll break apart. Let the mud settle and come back to it, you may find that it has absorbed all the water and needs more, or maybe it's just enough. You don't want too much water or else plants will sink into it.

Lay the plants down horizontally in very small clumps or as individual stems. The mud should be watery enough that they sink into it enough to always be wet and moist, but not so watery that they sink in and you can't see them anymore. They should "float" on the surface of the mud. Once this is done, cling wrap, poke some holes for air exchange, and leave it in a sunny area. I like to remove the cling wrap, fan them, and spray them with water at least once a day to keep air exchange up and prevent mold.

Water will evaporate and should keep the humidity inside the container close to 100%. Over time, new growth should be in emersed form and may tolerate slightly lower humidity, but I don't think they'll ever be able to tolerate an open container. Overall this is super low maintenance and will work for stem plants too :)
I got the three cultures from my LFS. As far as I can see they use a tank with eco complete and a light and they don’t cover the tank so far. Could you tell me if this is emerged or emersed growth?
 

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-Mak-

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That doesn't really look like tissue culture unless you've had it out for a while. Maybe I'm misunderstanding you aren't saying that they are aha. I'm guessing your LFS is able to maintain a decently high ambient humidity if they don't cover it?

This particular plant looks almost the same submersed or emersed, but I would guess submersed on yours if I had to. Either form will easily adapt to the technique described above :)
 

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