How To Get Rid Of Tannin?

Lintahlo
  • #1
I've set my new 30 gallon tank like two months ago and ever since I put in the driftwood am stuck with Tannin. I've done some water changes but those don't seem to help at all. I was wondering if I have to do a 100% water change or something else to get rid of the Tannin...
 
aussieJJDude
  • #2
They will continue to release tannins, which depending on the wood species and size can be for a couple of weeks to years.


To remove, I have had great success in doing large waterchanges/more frequent waterchanges with the addition of purigen. Some also swear by charcoal- however this can be costly since it has to be constantly replaced.


Boiling your driftwood can help release a lot/most of the tannins, so maybe consider doing that?
 
DutchAquarium
  • #3
Water changes are your best bet to getting rid of the tannins. However, that doesn't mean your wood will stop leaking though. Just let it soak longer and eventually no more tannins will leak out. However, tannins are quite benefical to the aquarium softening your water for some of your delicate species, and provides more cover for your fish
 
Kodie
  • #4
The water change will help, but the driftwood will proabably just keep leaching it out for a while. Some Seachem Purigen would clear it up rather quickly.
 
Lynn78too
  • #5
Did you soak it beforehand? It should have gotten rid of most of it beforehand. If it didn't you'll just have to wait it out. Don't do a 100% water change or you'll crash your cycle.

I have some tan substrate that leaches its color. It's obnoxious and I hate it but after spending a boatload of money on it there's no way I'm changing it out.

Bonus: Tannins are good for the fish so you can just think of it as you being a good fish owner for now.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #6
Did you soak it beforehand? It should have gotten rid of most of it beforehand. If it didn't you'll just have to wait it out. Don't do a 100% water change or you'll crash your cycle.

I have some tan substrate that leaches its color. It's obnoxious and I hate it but after spending a boatload of money on it there's no way I'm changing it out.

Bonus: Tannins are good for the fish so you can just think of it as you being a good fish owner for now.
Having substrate leech out into the water is not healthy for the inhabitants, even though it cost ans arm and a leg I would replace with something inert.
 
TexasGuppy
  • #7
I boiled my mopanI wood 12 times with clean water.. even then, it leeched some into the tank for another month or so.
 
Lynn78too
  • #8
Really? I hadn't realized that. I thought it was just because it was a tan color. It's supposed to be a good substrate for plants. :/
 
Wraithen
  • #9
Having substrate leech out into the water is not healthy for the inhabitants, even though it cost ans arm and a leg I would replace with something inert.
Idk. It depends on what it's leeching. There are special substrates for just about anything and this could be one designed for an Amazon biotope.
 
Culprit
  • #10
I've set my new 30 gallon tank like two months ago and ever since I put in the driftwood am stuck with Tannin. I've done some water changes but those don't seem to help at all. I was wondering if I have to do a 100% water change or something else to get rid of the Tannin...

Boil the DW a few times, and also just do water changes and add Purigen or Carbon. Tannins are beneficial though. It will keep leaching tannins for a while, so a 100% water change would likely be harmful to the fish and the tannins would be back within a few days. Just do 25% - 50% water changes every few days if you really don't like them
 
TexasGuppy
  • #11
Tannins can lower pH. That's not necessarily always a good thing.
 
Galathiel
  • #12
Not sure how often you are doing water changes (doesn't sound like you have a regular routine), but doing weekly 30-40 percent water changes consistently will keep the color to a minimum.
 
MoonsCow
  • #13
When I got my driftwood I boiled it twice, let it soak in the hot water each time then added it into one of my water change buckets and let it soak for a day. I did change out the water in the bucket at one point to dilute the amount of tanins in the bucket.
So when I added it to my tank about 24hours later it was saturated enough to sink and have yet to notice any discoloration in the water inside of the tank.

The driftwood that I have is fairly small and not so thick, so the process went much quicker than a larger piece would have.
 
Lintahlo
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Thanks, guys for all of your answers I'll just higher the water change from 50% to 65%-80%.
 
aussieJJDude
  • #15
Idk. It depends on what it's leeching. There are special substrates for just about anything and this could be one designed for an Amazon biotope.
I haven't heard of leeching substrate unless you're refering to dyed substrates- which according to a friend, is pretty common in the US? The fact that its tan, and the substrate is tan.... sounds like dyes to me.
 
Wraithen
  • #16
Could be, but some contain peat and other ingredients that are intended to grow lower ph plants, or help make a lower ph tank. Given that substrate is really vague, you could be right about dye or paint.
 
FriarThomasIII
  • #17
Boil the goodness out of the driftwood for a few hours, rinse and repeat until water runs clear. That's how I treat my driftwood to waterlog and remove tannins.
 
Lynn78too
  • #18
Idk. It depends on what it's leeching. There are special substrates for just about anything and this could be one designed for an Amazon biotope.
I talked with some people on my plant forum and they said it's just the dust. This stuff was awful, I had everything in there for about a month and it was so cloudy and wasn't settling I took it all out and rinsed it off again. This isn't colored, it's meant for plants and is an actual substrate, not a gravel.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

  • Question
Replies
16
Views
542
veggieshark
Top Bottom