How To Get Rich Green Plants?

Somthingfishy01

Right now I don't have much plants but some java moss and they are more of a dark green to brown looking, I want to get those light green and fresh looking plants I see whenever I go the store, any tips?
 

kallililly1973

Good lighting and a good plant fertilizer schedule for the plants your trying to grow. Some require co2.
 

smee82

Start dry dosing ferts using ei, dry dosing is cheaper and gives you better control.

Next add pressurized co2 and then upgrade your lighting. Add co2 first because high light and no co2 will probably cause a heap of algae.

Lastly replace your inert substrate with aquasoil.

Sounds complicated but once you start its pretty easy.
 

EbiAqua

Plants do best when they have a consistent availability of light and nutrients. Getting your lights on a timer will ensure your lighting periods are more consistent; algae will always take advantage of any inconsistencies in your lighting and fertilizer regiment.

Next is availability of nutrients. In the wild plants usually don't grow in plain sand or gravel, as it is nutrient poor. Likewise, your plants will do much better if they have access to readily available nutrients. The best way is to provide them with a nutrient-dense substrate, such as organic soil or aquasoils. The next best thing would be to provide nutrients for your plants with root tabs. Something is certainly better than nothing.

The three main nutrients utilized by plants are nitrogen, potassium, and carbon. Nitrogen is derived from substrates rich in nutrients, as well as ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. The later is reason enough to keep plants in your freshwater tank as they greatly improve water quality and cleanliness. Potassium is an important macro found in nutrient rich substrates. Normally when plants are in need of potassium, their leaves form holes and turn yellow. A macro-rich fertilizers such as Thrive ensures plants always have plenty of potassium. The final macro nutrient, carbon, is derived from CO2 via photosynthesis. There is always some CO2 dissolved in the water column, but it is in very tiny concentrations. Blasting plants with excessive amounts of light is counter-productive if you do not have the correct concentrations of CO2. By increasing the concentration of CO2, along with increased dosing of fertilizers, you can not only get lush, green plants, but they will be more compact, fuller, and usually grow much faster in these conditions.

Consider this: all plants grow faster outside of water when exposed to air. This is because the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is approximately 400x higher than in the water. By having virtually unlimited access to available carbon, plants grow larger and faster. You can simulate this in an aquarium environment by injecting CO2.

Its all about finding a balance. In tanks with lower light and no injected CO2, you will see slower growth but you also don't have to dose as much. Light and CO2 are the throttle, and nutrients are the fuel. All you really need in a low-tech tank is a good fertilizer that contains all the essential macro nutrients.
 

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