How to cool down the tank?

  1. bettanewbie Member Member

    Hello,
    I live in an area where it goes through four seasons. I have been watching the temperature on the tank since we are starting to get into high 70s. I know I can not adjust the heater to beat 90 degrees, or even in the 80s. How should I start to prepare to keep my tank in the 78-80 range in 90-100 temperatures? :confused:
     
  2. Dino Fishlore VIP Member

    There are a couple of ways to do so.
    Have a fan blow across the top of the water.
    Place frozen containers of ice to float and melt in the tank.
     

  3. Butterfly Moderator Moderator Member

    Most fish can also tolerate higher temperatures also. Mid 80- 88F as long as there is plenty of water movement they should be fine. Since warmer water holds less oxygen extra water changes will also replenish the oxygen supply as well as water movement or a bubbler.

    I don't worry about mine until they hit high 80's the as Dino said a fan blowing across the top of the water and frozen water bottles floated in the tank.
    Carol
     

  4. bettanewbie Member Member

    Should I grab an aquarium fan as well?
     

  5. catsma_97504 Fishlore Legend Member

    I go through the same thing! Our summers are typically 100-110F for highs; 70-75F for lows. Here's a few of the things I do....

    *Leave the lights off all day. Fish get enough light from the ambient room lighting. If planted, then I run the lights in the early morning hours for a couple of hours.

    *Run extra air lines. This helps to oxygenate the water as well as cause surface disturbance to dissipate the heat.

    *Freeze 20-ounce bottles. Cools off the tank without worrying about untreated water affecting fish.

    *Point fans directly at water surface

    *Do very small water changes with slightly cooler water

    *In extreme cases, I unplug the heater. But be very careful if taking this path.

    The larger the tank the less the temperature of the water is affected. I only need to take these steps in my 25G and smaller tanks.

    Good luck.
     
  6. bettanewbie Member Member

  7. nippybetta Well Known Member Member

    Probably, if your hooking up an air pump. Air stones help to diffuse the air so the oxygen can enter the water more easily. Holy cow, Catsma, you get pretty warm in Oregon. We're lucky to get in the 90's here in Western Washington.
     
  8. bettanewbie Member Member

    What about a bubbler? (If that is the correct term) The temps here can reach 110 and nights can be in the 90s since I am in a city. :/
     
  9. catsma_97504 Fishlore Legend Member

    Anything you attach to the end of the line running off an air pump would work. If your lows are still 90 degrees, you will not be able to cool your tank much. Another option you may want to consider is a chiller; otherwise you should plan for 95-100 degree water.

    Yeah, it can get hot here. But cross the coastal mountains and you're in another world with the extreme temperature change.
     
  10. Aquarist Fishlore Legend Member

  11. Tuufy Member Member

    Also dont bother with an aquarium fan they are better than useless unless you have a tiny tank. Get a 6" fan or bigger, one that is on a clip. if you can clip it to the frame of the tank, if not you will have to be inventive to rig it over the top of the tank so it can blow across the water, you want to secure it so it doesn't fall in of course.
     
  12. sweetsammi Member Member

    I never use the chillers that come with water bottles and had a few thrown in my junk drawer. I started keeping them in the freezer in the summer and floating them in the tank during the summer. Even though my ac is set on 78 my small tank starts to creep up around 84 in the summer. I have my big tank right in front of my ac/ heater vent no issues with this one.
     
  13. ryanr Moderator Moderator Member

    :;du This is an older thread. Chances are the OP has resolved their issue. Pleas remember to check the date of the last post when responding.