How social are endlers?

Sputnik

Member
I have a tank with endlers and guppies ( male only). One group of endlers I purchased as adults were poor doers and the last one was found dead today. Now there are 2 endlers ( from another vendor) and 4 swordtail guppies. All of these appear healthy and in good body condition. My question is if this group is sufficient for the social needs of both the guppies and endlers. I would rather not add more animals to this tank. The endlers primarily stick with each other but also interact with the guppies.
Parameters-pH 7.4, temp 79F , ammonia 0, nitrites 0, nitrates 0 to 20 ( usually 5). Water changes of 25 percent weekly. Any thoughts are appreciated!
 

jkkgron2

Member
I’ve noticed that mine enjoy each others company and it’s fun to watch them interact with each other but i think it won’t hurt them to keep only 2.
 

RayClem

Member
Liverbearer species whether endlers, guppies, platies, swordtails or mollies are all shoaling fish. The do not form schools like many saltwater species, but they are highly social. Although they can be kept in small numbers, they will be happier if kept with several others of their species. They may interact with related species if others of their species are not available, but this is not guaranteed. I have a single male swordtail in a community tank that hangs out with the platies.

Since endlers and guppies are closely related species, they will hang out with one another, but your endlers would be happier if there were more endlers in the tank. You did not state your tank size, so I do not know what the total stocking population of the tank should be. That also depends on the quality of your filtration system.

Your water quality parameters should be fine for any livebearers other than mollies. They tend to like water that is slightly hard and slightly higher in pH. There are many other community species such as corydoras catfish, tetras, danios, rasboras, etc. that could work well in your tank if it is large enough to accommodate them.
 
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Sputnik

Member
RayClem said:
Liverbearer species whether endlers, guppies, platies, swordtails or mollies are all shoaling fish. The do not form schools like many saltwater species, but they are highly social. Although they can be kept in small numbers, they will be happier if kept with several others of their species. They may interact with related species if others of their species are not available, but this is not guaranteed. I have a single male swordtail in a community tank that hangs out with the platies.

Since endlers and guppies are closely related species, they will hang out with one another, but your endlers would be happier if there were more endlers in the tank. You did not state your tank size, so I do not know what the total stocking population of the tank should be. That also depends on the quality of your filtration system.

Your water quality parameters should be fine for any livebearers other than mollies. They tend to like water that is slightly hard and slightly higher in pH. There are many other community species such as corydoras catfish, tetras, danios, rasboras, etc. that could work well in your tank if it is large enough to accommodate them.
Thanks! Its a 10 gallon: stocking consists of:
4 small sized adult swordtail guppies ( only slightly bigger than the endlers)
2 silverado endlers
betta mahachai pair (young adults- male about 2 inches and female about 1.5 inches)
3 adult amano shrimp
Everyone gets along and I have a sponge filter for a 20 gallon tank in there, but I do worry about overstocking. I am considering upgrading the tank to a 15 gallon but have too much going on to do that immediately.
 

RayClem

Member
Sputnik said:
Thanks! Its a 10 gallon: stocking consists of:
4 small sized adult swordtail guppies ( only slightly bigger than the endlers)
2 silverado endlers
betta mahachai pair (young adults- male about 2 inches and female about 1.5 inches)
3 adult amano shrimp
Everyone gets along and I have a sponge filter for a 20 gallon tank in there, but I do worry about overstocking. I am considering upgrading the tank to a 15 gallon but have too much going on to do that immediately.
Sponge filter are quite good for biological filtering, but fish waste tends to build up in the sponge unless you are diligent about rinsing it out in tank water periodically. You might want to consider adding an external HOB filter to your tank. If you get one, I suggest getting a one rated for 20 or even 30 gallons rather than 10 gallons. Excess filtration capacity is not generally an issue as long as the flow is not excessive. That way if you decide to upgrade to a larger tank (15 gal, 20 gal long, 20 gal high, or 29 gallon), the filter will still be suitable. I have a 55 gallon tank and filter it with undergravel filters driven by two powerheads, an Aqueon HOB filter rated for 75 gallons plus a Fluval/Aquaclear HOB filter rated for 125 gallons. While I might not NEED this much filtration, neither is it excessive.

Even in my 10 gallon divided tank with two male bettas I use two internal corner filters and a HOB filter rated for 20 gallons. Bettas do not appreciate high current, so I did not want to go any larger than that,.

I hope your betta mahachai do well. Typically, they live in somewhat brackish water. I do not know how well they will do in fresh water. Also, keeping a male and female in a 10 gallon tank might be a problem. If they are still young, they may get along well, but the male could begin to harass the female as they get older. In a 10 gallon tank, the female does not have many places to hide. Do not be surprised if you have to separate them.
 
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Sputnik

Member
Thanks! it is heavily planted but I will keep an eye out for harrassment and look into additional filtration. Here are some pictures- ignore the sterite container the tank is sitting in- renters insurance for leaks!
 

RayClem

Member
It looks like your tank is well planted and aquascaped. The does provide some hiding areas for your female betta. Hopefully, she will be happy in the tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

Sputnik

Member
RayClem said:
It looks like your tank is well planted and aquascaped. The does provide some hiding areas for your female betta. Hopefully, she will be happy in the tank.
Thank you! My space is limited and I have some constraints when it comes to my fishkeeping addiction, but I do my best!
 

Kevinthebreeder

Member
I actually think guppies and endlers don't have to be in a group to feel content. When I got my first guppy, she was completely alone in the tank and she seemed to be very happy and active. After I introduced more guppies, there were cases of chasing and nipping, alongside with fighting over food and territory. Guppies and endlers aren't like tetras or danios that rely on schooling to feel comfortable.
 

emeraldking

Member
Kevinthebreeder said:
I actually think guppies and endlers don't have to be in a group to feel content. When I got my first guppy, she was completely alone in the tank and she seemed to be very happy and active. After I introduced more guppies, there were cases of chasing and nipping, alongside with fighting over food and territory. Guppies and endlers aren't like tetras or danios that rely on schooling to feel comfortable.
Guppies & endlers are doing just fine when kept by themselves. No arguement there....
 

jkkgron2

Member
Kevinthebreeder said:
I actually think guppies and endlers don't have to be in a group to feel content. When I got my first guppy, she was completely alone in the tank and she seemed to be very happy and active. After I introduced more guppies, there were cases of chasing and nipping, alongside with fighting over food and territory. Guppies and endlers aren't like tetras or danios that rely on schooling to feel comfortable.
IME endlers like to shoal in larger groups. I currently have 30+ endlers in my 40 gallon, and they often shoal. It’s really interesting to watch, and they are more active and bold than they had been before there were that many.
 

RayClem

Member
Adding new guppies or endlers to a tank which was the abode of a single fish is a completely different situation that introducing a group of fish at the same time. Any fish that lives alone feels like his territory has been invaded when new fish are added.

Most livebearers give birth to many fry at one time. They normally grow up together until humans separate them.
 

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