How So I Safely Raise My Tanks Ph In Freshwater

Seasoldier

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Hi & welcome to Fishlore. A ph of 6 is a bit low for some fish but fish will get used to it, it's more important to have a stable ph rather than chasing a perfect one which usually results in ph swings which is far more damaging to the fish. Your blue ram will be right at home in ph6 & it's not too far off for your tetras & guppies either & even the gourami they will all be OK at 6.8 but will acclimate to 6, your snails will be OK even though they prefer water a bit harder but if you add some sort of calcium supplement for them they should be OK. If you do want to raise the ph a bit do it slowly so as not to shock the fish & it's best to use natural stuff like almond leaves, bog wood & peat moss to do it rather than adding chemicals. Slightly off topic but just FYI you may get some aggression between the gourami & the other fish depending on the gourami type (some can be very aggressive) & also if the assassin snail doesn't have another source of food (like pest snails) it will likely attack the nerite when it gets hungry.
 

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How big is your tank? I had the same issue at 6 ph in my 75 gallon about 2 months ago. I basically used baking soda at 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons. I used about 8-10 teaspoons mixed with water and poured it in. Check ph 3 minutes later and it was at 7.5! I watched the fish and they had no issue with it.
 

Seasoldier

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How big is your tank? I had the same issue at 6 ph in my 75 gallon about 2 months ago. I basically used baking soda at 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons. I used about 8-10 teaspoons mixed with water and poured it in. Check ph 3 minutes later and it was at 7.5! I watched the fish and they had no issue with it.
6 to 7.5 in three minutes will probably send the gourami into shock & kill them, I don't think that's good advice to be giving.
 

Momgoose56

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Hi, and welcome to Fishlore!
What is your source water-and Is that the pH of your source or tank water? It would be a good idea to get a GH/KH test kit.
Simply adding crushed coral, limestone, seashells or Texas holey rock to your tank will raise your pH and KH slowly. Removing driftwood and thoroughly boiling decorations (that may be leaching acids into the tank) can also help. However, as I suggested, a GH/KH test kit could help identify causes for your low pH as well and point to the best fix for it. Compare your source pH with your 4 or 5 day old tank water to see what kind of adjustment occurs naturally from tap to tank as well. Keep us posted.
* you don't want to use baking soda if you aren't a pro-at best it's a temporary fix, at worst a rapid pH adjustment will kill your fish as @Seasoldier stated above!
 

Cichlidude

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6 to 7.5 in three minutes will probably send the gourami into shock & kill them, I don't think that's good advice to be giving.
I never said for him to do this. I just said what I did and my experience. I may have used too much baking soda. Use a lot less for a smaller raise in ph.
 

Momgoose56

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Hi & welcome to Fishlore. A ph of 6 is a bit low for some fish but fish will get used to it, it's more important to have a stable ph rather than chasing a perfect one which usually results in ph swings which is far more damaging to the fish. Your blue ram will be right at home in ph6 & it's not too far off for your tetras & guppies either & even the gourami they will all be OK at 6.8 but will acclimate to 6, your snails will be OK even though they prefer water a bit harder but if you add some sort of calcium supplement for them they should be OK. If you do want to raise the ph a bit do it slowly so as not to shock the fish & it's best to use natural stuff like almond leaves, bog wood & peat moss to do it rather than adding chemicals. Slightly off topic but just FYI you may get some aggression between the gourami & the other fish depending on the gourami type (some can be very aggressive) & also if the assassin snail doesn't have another source of food (like pest snails) it will likely attack the nerite when it gets hungry.
Actually, @Seasoldier, peat moss, bog wood, almond leaves and driftwood lower pH. Coral, limestone, Texas holey rock, seashells etc add calcium and bicarbonate to the water over time.
 

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oldsalt777

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I have a fresh water tropical tank with 2 tetras, a blue ram, 3 guppies, 2 gouramis, a nerite snail and a assassin snail. My ph is at 6.0. Is that to low of a ph and if so how can I raise it safely with fish in the tank?
Hello Small...

This is the low end of the pH table. So, you have acidic water. Fish you get at the local pet stores will adapt to a pH between 6 and 8.5, as long as you maintain a constant reading with large, frequent water changes. I wouldn't worry about your tap water. Just acclimate the fish properly and change most of the tank water weekly. Don't try to change the pH, this generally doesn't work out well for the fish.

Old
 

Momgoose56

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Hello Small...

This is the low end of the pH table. So, you have acidic water. Fish you get at the local pet stores will adapt to a pH between 6 and 8.5, as long as you maintain a constant reading with large, frequent water changes. I wouldn't worry about your tap water. Just acclimate the fish properly and change most of the tank water weekly. Don't try to change the pH, this generally doesn't work out well for the fish.

Old
On the other hand, the nerite WILL suffer if calcium/bicarb is low. Acid levels eat at their shells and low calcium prevents new shell growth. Having an optimal pH in a tank for all species in the tank is critical in maintaining the health of all the fish. A pH between 7 and 8 would be optimal for all the fish in your tank. Plus adding calcium (in the above mentioned 'rock') will ensure the survival of your snail and gourami.
 

oldsalt777

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On the other hand, the nerite WILL suffer if calcium/bicarb is low. Acid levels eat at their shells and low calcium prevents new shell growth. Having an optimal pH in a tank for all species in the tank is critical in maintaining the health of all the fish. A pH between 7 and 8 would be optimal for all the fish in your tank. Plus adding calcium (in the above mentioned 'rock') will ensure the survival of your snail and gourami.
Hello Mom...

Nerite snails are kept in saltwater tanks with no problems. Salt water is much more caustic than freshwater with a lower pH. The vast majority of aquarium fish and snails will adapt to the vast majority of tap water conditions. As long as the pH is steady, the fish and snails will adapt. Trying to change the water chemistry and maintaining the change is a really difficult job and I wouldn't recommend doing it.

Old
 
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Smallfish

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Thank you everybody I really apreciate the feedback on my question it has helped me understand ph and hiw if effects my water creatures.

Hi & welcome to Fishlore. A ph of 6 is a bit low for some fish but fish will get used to it, it's more important to have a stable ph rather than chasing a perfect one which usually results in ph swings which is far more damaging to the fish. Your blue ram will be right at home in ph6 & it's not too far off for your tetras & guppies either & even the gourami they will all be OK at 6.8 but will acclimate to 6, your snails will be OK even though they prefer water a bit harder but if you add some sort of calcium supplement for them they should be OK. If you do want to raise the ph a bit do it slowly so as not to shock the fish & it's best to use natural stuff like almond leaves, bog wood & peat moss to do it rather than adding chemicals. Slightly off topic but just FYI you may get some aggression between the gourami & the other fish depending on the gourami type (some can be very aggressive) & also if the assassin snail doesn't have another source of food (like pest snails) it will likely attack the nerite when it gets hungry.
Would sea shells help provide some calcium for my snails? The calcium supplement from seachem is expensive on Amazon and I don't think my lsf has any ? I have some trumpet snails coming for my assasin snail to feed on.
 

Momgoose56

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Would sea shells help provide some calcium for my snails? The calcium supplement from seachem is expensive on Amazon and I don't think my lsf has any ? I have some trumpet snails coming for my assasin snail to feed on.
Seashells are made of calcium and bicarbonate too, just like crushed coral and limestone etc. Yes, they might be okay, if they're old beach shells, crushed or partially broken down. If you don't already have seashells, crushed coral is probably your least expensive option. If you put it in your filter overflow chamber, you would use 1 cup per 30 gallons tank water. If you add it as part of your substrate, you'd add 1 pound per 10 gallons of tank water. Left overs store forever or can be used to break up dense clay garden soil, to augment calcium in sandy garden soils and around plants that require more calcium. If its smaller than pea sized, it can be given to chickens as part of their calcium. Just scatter it around their pen or put it in a dish and they will pick it up as needed.
However, since there seems to be some disagreement here on the difference between "chasing pH" and "stabilizing pH" and the discussion now has you somewhat confused, I would suggest that you investigate a few things on your own and base your decision on that. Things to look at regarding buffering/stabilizing your water with a calcium carbonate 'rock' source
1. Look at the pH of the water used where your fish came from. I don't mean the water at your Petco or petsmart, I mean the water where their fish came from-the source water the fish were bred and raised in. As you probably already know, big box store fish aren't around long. They are either sold quickly or die of illness or stress at those stores.
2. Look at the pH and KH (Carbonate hardness/buffering capacity) that is considered 'ideal' or 'preferred' for the species of fish you have-if your current pH (6) is 1 degree lower or more than what is considered ideal, then maybe you want to add some coral to your tank.
3. Check your pH in your tank and tap 2 or 3 times during a single day, several hours apart. If there is a bigger change than .2 or .3 degrees during a single day, you probably need to add some buffer (crushed coral et al) to your tank to stabilize the acid/base balance.
And as I suggested before, getting a good liquid GH/KH test kit, especially with water as acidic as yours, is a good idea. Many times municipal water companies buffer tap water at the treatment facilities. If the buffers used are short acting, once that water reaches its destination, the pH can drop drastically. KH measures the capacity or ability of your water to remain at a stable pH by buffering acid.
 
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Smallfish

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I have 2 hob filters one is a aqua clear and the other fuval c3. Could I just put old beach shells in my tank to help my snails get calcium they need or do I need to crush them up and out them in my filter ?
 

Momgoose56

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I have 2 hob filters one is a aqua clear and the other fuval c3. Could I just put old beach shells in my tank to help my snails get calcium they need or do I need to crush them up and out them in my filter ?
Yes, either way. I'd be just as (maybe more) concerned about the pH in your tank. Especially for the Gourami. Reread my last post, I made some suggestions, and read this:
https://aquariuminfo.org/zebraneritesnail.html
Your original question was how to raise your pH. The solutions I gave you do not "chase" the pH, they may raise it some, but will stabilize it if your KH is low.
This is the municipal water company for Providence. Check out the water quality reports and treatment details:
https://www.provwater.com/
 
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Smallfish

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Seashells are made of calcium and bicarbonate too, just like crushed coral and limestone etc. Yes, they might be okay, if they're old beach shells, crushed or partially broken down. If you don't already have seashells, crushed coral is probably your least expensive option. If you put it in your filter overflow chamber, you would use 1 cup per 30 gallons tank water. If you add it as part of your substrate, you'd add 1 pound per 10 gallons of tank water. Left overs store forever or can be used to break up dense clay garden soil, to augment calcium in sandy garden soils and around plants that require more calcium. If its smaller than pea sized, it can be given to chickens as part of their calcium. Just scatter it around their pen or put it in a dish and they will pick it up as needed.
However, since there seems to be some disagreement here on the difference between "chasing pH" and "stabilizing pH" and the discussion now has you somewhat confused, I would suggest that you investigate a few things on your own and base your decision on that. Things to look at regarding buffering/stabilizing your water with a calcium carbonate 'rock' source
1. Look at the pH of the water used where your fish came from. I don't mean the water at your Petco or petsmart, I mean the water where their fish came from-the source water the fish were bred and raised in. As you probably already know, big box store fish aren't around long. They are either sold quickly or die of illness or stress at those stores.
2. Look at the pH and KH (Carbonate hardness/buffering capacity) that is considered 'ideal' or 'preferred' for the species of fish you have-if your current pH (6) is 1 degree lower or more than what is considered ideal, then maybe you want to add some coral to your tank.
3. Check your pH in your tank and tap 2 or 3 times during a single day, several hours apart. If there is a bigger change than .2 or .3 degrees during a single day, you probably need to add some buffer (crushed coral et al) to your tank to stabilize the acid/base balance.
And as I suggested before, getting a good liquid GH/KH test kit, especially with water as acidic as yours, is a good idea. Many times municipal water companies buffer tap water at the treatment facilities. If the buffers used are short acting, once that water reaches its destination, the pH can drop drastically. KH measures the capacity or ability of your water to remain at a stable pH by buffering acid.[/QUO j
Seashells are made of calcium and bicarbonate too, just like crushed coral and limestone etc. Yes, they might be okay, if they're old beach shells, crushed or partially broken down. If you don't already have seashells, crushed coral is probably your least expensive option. If you put it in your filter overflow chamber, you would use 1 cup per 30 gallons tank water. If you add it as part of your substrate, you'd add 1 pound per 10 gallons of tank water. Left overs store forever or can be used to break up dense clay garden soil, to augment calcium in sandy garden soils and around plants that require more calcium. If its smaller than pea sized, it can be given to chickens as part of their calcium. Just scatter it around their pen or put it in a dish and they will pick it up as needed.
However, since there seems to be some disagreement here on the difference between "chasing pH" and "stabilizing pH" and the discussion now has you somewhat confused, I would suggest that you investigate a few things on your own and base your decision on that. Things to look at regarding buffering/stabilizing your water with a calcium carbonate 'rock' source
1. Look at the pH of the water used where your fish came from. I don't mean the water at your Petco or petsmart, I mean the water where their fish came from-the source water the fish were bred and raised in. As you probably already know, big box store fish aren't around long. They are either sold quickly or die of illness or stress at those stores.
2. Look at the pH and KH (Carbonate hardness/buffering capacity) that is considered 'ideal' or 'preferred' for the species of fish you have-if your current pH (6) is 1 degree lower or more than what is considered ideal, then maybe you want to add some coral to your tank.
3. Check your pH in your tank and tap 2 or 3 times during a single day, several hours apart. If there is a bigger change than .2 or .3 degrees during a single day, you probably need to add some buffer (crushed coral et al) to your tank to stabilize the acid/base balance.
And as I suggested before, getting a good liquid GH/KH test kit, especially with water as acidic as yours, is a good idea. Many times municipal water companies buffer tap water at the treatment facilities. If the buffers used are short acting, once that water reaches its destination, the pH can drop drastically. KH measures the capacity or ability of your water to remain at a stable pH by buffering acid.
I just got a gh/kh test kit my gh was 5 drops before it change and my kh was yellow on the 1st drop. In a little confused with the directions?
 

Momgoose56

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I just got a gh/kh test kit my gh was 5 drops before it change and my kh was yellow on the 1st drop. In a little confused with the directions?
API GH/KH test kit- One drop at a time, invert tube with each drop, KH is number of drops it takes to turn solution from blue to yellow. GH is number of drops it takes to turn solution from orange to green.
Your KH is very low as I suspected, so your water has no buffering capacity. Crushed coral or one of the other 'rock' buffers will slowly raise your KH and keep it there. It will also very slowly raise your pH and keep it stable. I would stay away from liquid buffers. Just add the crushed coral. You don't have to screw with it, ever, it just sits there and does its work. You won't have to even think about it for several years if you use it as a substrate, and if you put it in your filter just replace it once a year. What is the pH of your tap water right out of the faucet? I already asked once but you were being bombarded by conflicting information....
 
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Smallfish

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What is a good crush coral product to put in my hob filter ? I already have substrate down and wouldnt want to change it out.
 
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