How rare are Super Red BN Pleco?

JEGuerra

I was at my LFS a week ago, and I saw they had a SR BN Pleco, I asked how frequent they get them and they told me that they're super rare, and only had 2 come into their shop in the last 30 years. Are they really this rare?
 

Wouldratherwatchaquarium

I've only seen them for Sale online, none of my lfs's ever have them. Could be just my area, I'm In the UK so it may be different over the pond. The orange BN I see more often, I have one of those and it's a lovely looking plec.
 
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Demeter

Depends on where you live, I'm in MI and while I don't see them too often (not that I'm really looking) you can find them here and there. I've bought them from a local pet store for say 8$ or so and then traded some rabbit snails for a group of fry on here.

The real question is the quality. Most super reds you find will have some black markings on their tails, so not great quality. A very nice super red will have next to no black markings. But then there are the calicos, which are IMO much harder to find and are basically super reds with lots of black markings all over their body and fins. Interestingly enough, when I crossed a male red with a female long finned calico all the babies look to be calicos with varying amounts of black markings and even a few have long fins.
 
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JettsPapa

I got some from coralbandit a year or so ago. I didn't get the impression they were really rare.
 
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CHJ

BNs are super common for the most part. Supers, long fin, albinos, lemons, calicos, "green"s, etc. Maybe not at your LFS but you can buy them when you want.
You want Cthulhu face and "super rare" wabenmuster and beyond that the green and gold ones cory got on their trip to Peru which died in shipping. :( I have talked to the LFS owner about maybe going to Peru to try to get some of those. The supplier which AC may have worked with doesn't return emails to the US or maybe not at all or Gmail kills email from them. Their website also seems broken though that might be my antimalware installs.
Starlights and medusas are less common. Not BN but Cthulhu face.
 
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Yeoy

Depends on where you live, I'm in MI and while I don't see them too often (not that I'm really looking) you can find them here and there. I've bought them from a local pet store for say 8$ or so and then traded some rabbit snails for a group of fry on here.

The real question is the quality. Most super reds you find will have some black markings on their tails, so not great quality. A very nice super red will have next to no black markings. But then there are the calicos, which are IMO much harder to find and are basically super reds with lots of black markings all over their body and fins. Interestingly enough, when I crossed a male red with a female long finned calico all the babies look to be calicos with varying amounts of black markings and even a few have long fins.

As far as I know the super-reds were line-bred from calico BNs so that's why they would throw calicos. Where I am (Australia) they are still relatively uncommon but as they're a newer strain they're starting to become much more common. They can still be a little bit pricey but that will come down over time.

If you're interested in them and have space I'd say definitely buy them. They should be relatively easy to breed once they mature. And you could help spread the species through the hobby if you can be bothered raising the fry.
 
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JEGuerra

As far as I know the super-reds were line-bred from calico BNs so that's why they would throw calicos. Where I am (Australia) they are still relatively uncommon but as they're a newer strain they're starting to become much more common. They can still be a little bit pricey but that will come down over time.

If you're interested in them and have space I'd say definitely buy them. They should be relatively easy to breed once they mature. And you could help spread the species through the hobby if you can be bothered raising the fry.
Well, I have been trying to get into breeding for awhile and I've been interested in breeding bn pleco, I actually have a post just recently about it. I'd definitely feel better about breeding bn pleco if I could do an uncommon variation like the super red, especially since it's supposedly super rare around my area. Only problem is how to get a pair
 
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Yeoy

Well, I have been trying to get into breeding for awhile and I've been interested in breeding bn pleco, I actually have a post just recently about it. I'd definitely feel better about breeding bn pleco if I could do an uncommon variation like the super red, especially since it's supposedly super rare around my area. Only problem is how to get a pair
I think your best bet would be to try your other local shops or see what you can find online near you, including Facebook groups, Craigslist etc... Or ask the shop if they can order more in? You'd probably have to order a few sub-adults and then wait and hope for a pair to form. Could be a cool project if it takes off though.
 
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MacZ

Even counting in local availabilities, super reds are available from online vendors everywhere and all the time in basically every country where services like that are available.
Domestic strains are never a real rarity and if a store employee wants to tell you that, it's a blatant lie.

There are sometimes exceptions, as not every new breed is stable (= every fry shows the desired characteristics) from the start, so a strain that has reached stability only recently may be a rarity. But usually only for a season, then everyone and their grandmothers have a pair, bred them and spread them.

Anyhow, super red bristlenose plecos are not one of them.
 
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coralbandit

It takes a while to grow out SR BNP .
Don't know about other BNP but it could take up to 2 years of growth before they are mature enough to breed .
The SR BNP is not commonly available in my area at LFS and go for $30 each ..
I have been selling them for years now .
They are really not in super high demand to my surprise ?
 
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jmaldo

SR Plecos, not very rare in these parts. Have quite a few breeders in my local fish club. I will say females do sell at 3-4x the price compared to males. So, I have been growing out a couple of Starlights only about 2 years young, still not 100% sure have a pair (Fingers-crossed). But.. according to research, will/may take years to eventually breed. Already have LFSs near me interested.

Good Luck!
 
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JEGuerra

Even counting in local availabilities, super reds are available from online vendors everywhere and all the time in basically every country where services like that are available.
Domestic strains are never a real rarity and if a store employee wants to tell you that, it's a blatant lie.

There are sometimes exceptions, as not every new breed is stable (= every fry shows the desired characteristics) from the start, so a strain that has reached stability only recently may be a rarity. But usually only for a season, then everyone and their grandmothers have a pair, bred them and spread them.

Anyhow, super red bristlenose plecos are not one of them.
In this case, do you have any other bn variations that might be interesting to breed?
 
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MacZ

To me any strains are interchangable and from my point of view breeding BN is futile. In my country it has become normal to advise to take only one specimen so they don't breed uncontrollably. They are seen as the Guppies of the Pleco world and when looking at Ebay classifieds or other online marketplaces you see dozens of offers for BN plecos all the time for as little as 50ct a piece for fully grown specimens.

My advice: Stay away from breeding for the time being, get a grip of your local market and when you see there is demand in a species (any, not just plecos) that you might pull off breeding with your fishkeeping skills go for those.

I've seen too many young aquarists getting out of the hobby because they couldn't get rid of all the fry they had overcrowding their tanks.
 
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JEGuerra

To me any strains are interchangable and from my point of view breeding BN is futile. In my country it has become normal to advise to take only one specimen so they don't breed uncontrollably. They are seen as the Guppies of the Pleco world and when looking at Ebay classifieds or other online marketplaces you see dozens of offers for BN plecos all the time for as little as 50ct a piece for fully grown specimens.

My advice: Stay away from breeding for the time being, get a grip of your local market and when you see there is demand in a species (any, not just plecos) that you might pull off breeding with your fishkeeping skills go for those.

I've seen too many young aquarists getting out of the hobby because they couldn't get rid of all the fry they had overcrowding their tanks.
Honestly, the more I look into breeding the scarier it gets. I think you're post has sorta snapped me out of the mindset that I need to start breeding, thank you very much. For now I'm just gonna keep my community tank and learn as much as I can about the hobby, and save breeding for a little bit later down the road
 
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MacZ

That's a very considerate and grown-up decision.

I started when I was around 8 or 9, and bred fish together with my dad until I was about two or three years older then you are now, then I took a long hiatus until a few years ago.
It was one of the few things my dad and I were both interested in, but my dad quickly decided to breed Malawi cichlids (mostly wild caught) and soon 1 tank became 25.
When I was old enough for my own tanks in the fishroom (I must have been 12 maybe) I turned towards Tanganyika cichlids.
But that was in the Nineties and most of our fish were rather rarities that were only available as wild caughts. We only broke even, even with pricey fish, and we used to grow out maybe 1-2 spawns before selling the breeder pairs and getting a new species. We had a great network back then and so we rarely had problems selling, but we had times when a fish just wouldn't sell and then we had 2, 3 tanks blocked with fish we couldn't get rid of, while new ones were already coming in... stressful and really high maintenance.
 
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BigManAquatics

That's a very considerate and grown-up decision.

I started when I was around 8 or 9, and bred fish together with my dad until I was about two or three years older then you are now, then I took a long hiatus until a few years ago.
It was one of the few things my dad and I were both interested in, but my dad quickly decided to breed Malawi cichlids (mostly wild caught) and soon 1 tank became 25.
When I was old enough for my own tanks in the fishroom (I must have been 12 maybe) I turned towards Tanganyika cichlids.
But that was in the Nineties and most of our fish were rather rarities that were only available as wild caughts. We only broke even, even with pricey fish, and we used to grow out maybe 1-2 spawns before selling the breeder pairs and getting a new species. We had a great network back then and so we rarely had problems selling, but we had times when a fish just wouldn't sell and then we had 2, 3 tanks blocked with fish we couldn't get rid of, while new ones were already coming in... stressful and really high maintenance.
Only person i know in my daily life that breeds bn plecos also has the advantage of working part time at an LFS, so the bn's they sell there are usually his. They want my peacock gudgeon fry though....apparently not many have fry around here.
 
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MacZ

Here and right now, the only real demand is species that are usually either wild caught or at least wild type, especially tetras, apistos and l-number plecos.
You can get all kinds of domestic strains all the time, even rarer breeds, but nobody wants them right now.
 
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