How Often To Do Water Changes

ToCkSiC

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Out of interest are you doing water tests and do you know if your tank is cycled? I have only just started myself so I'm not sure about everything but normally a filter is one of the first things you should be getting, but I could be completely wrong.
 
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Nightshadethebetta

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ToCkSiC said:
Out of interest are you doing water tests and do you know if your tank is cycled? I have only just started myself so I'm not sure about everything but normally a filter is one of the first things you should be getting, but I could be completely wrong.
I do daily water tests actually I let my tank run fishless for a couple of days with my filter running and heater on. I also use stability and prime. I didn’t have a filter with my previous fish who recently passed, so I’m trying to do better with my new one!
 

Fashooga

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Once your tank is established I think weekly water changes of 30-50% is good.

You could get away with biweekly water changes but I would wait about six months before doing that.
 

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There a lot of variables Are you using city water, well water, bottled mineral water, RO/DI water?

But in an aquarium that tiny You should be doing water changes everyday. I do not keep bettas in less than 10 gallons. In my opinion 5 gallons is the smallest.

Test the water and keep an eye on the readings. In an aquarium that tiny things can go wrong very fast.
 

ToCkSiC

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Nightshadethebetta said:
I do daily water tests actually I let my tank run fishless for a couple of days with my filter running and heater on. I also use stability and prime. I didn’t have a filter with my previous fish who recently passed, so I’m trying to do better with my new one!
Ah ok well then I am at the same stage as you, so I don't think it would be right or fair for me to give advice lol

I'm sure the knowledgeable folk here will help though.
 
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Nightshadethebetta

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Thunder_o_b said:
There a lot of variables Are you using city water, well water, bottled mineral water, RO/DI water?

But in an aquarium that tiny You should be doing water changes everyday. I do not keep bettas in less than 10 gallons. In my opinion 5 gallons is the smallest.

Test the water and keep an eye on the readings. In an aquarium that tiny things can go wrong very fast.
I have city water that contains ammonia in it. But I use stability and prime, and my readings in the tank have shown zero for ammonia for the past 3 days. I also have zero nitrites and maybe slight nitrates (need to retest that one). I was afraid doing daily changes would mess up my cycle or restart it.
 

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ToCkSiC said:
Out of interest are you doing water tests and do you know if your tank is cycled? I have only just started myself so I'm not sure about everything but normally a filter is one of the first things you should be getting, but I could be completely wrong.
If he/she didn't have filter until now, then it's probably not cycled.

Nightshadethebetta said:
Before I got a filter, I did 50% water changes weekly. Now that I have one, I’m not sure how often I should change out the water and how much. I have a 2.5 gallon tank with one betta

So if this is a case you should buy seachem prime, bacteria booster/activator, and it would be good to buy water test kit.

Next you need to do fish in cycle, you can google it or find begginer guide at this forum for details.

So every or every other day you should do 50% water changes with prime for 3-5,6 (that's where test kit come in handy so you know whats going on) weeks until you cycle your tank.
Add bacteria booster like it says on packaging and thats it.
After that process you are good to do like 35-50% water change weekly.

And yes this all that i said is must do, your betta is still alive because it's hardy fish, but without doing all that in long run it will not survive and in shorter period of time you would probably start noticing fin rot, ich etc.

Plus in my opinion 2.5 gallon isn't enough even for shrimps for long life so try and plan to buy bigger tank in future.

While i was typing this i see new posts. So just keep doing what you do for few weeks until your ammonia, nitrite readings are 0 and nitrate max 20 ppm.

And actually i stay at point where i think more frequently water changes in that small if tank will be better, you can do like 20-30% daily or every other day.
 
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Nightshadethebetta

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appcontrol said:
If he/she didn't have filter until now, then it's probably not cycled.




So if this is a case you should buy seachem prime, bacteria booster/activator, and it would be good to buy water test kit.

Next you need to do fish in cycle, you can google it or find begginer guide at this forum for details.

So every or every other day you should do 50% water changes with prime for 3-5,6 (that's where test kit come in handy so you know whats going on) weeks until you cycle your tank.
Add bacteria booster like it says on packaging and thats it.
After that process you are good to do like 35-50% water change weekly.

And yes this all that i said is must do, your betta is still alive because it's hardy fish, but without doing all that in long run it will not survive and in shorter period of time you would probably start noticing fin rot, ich etc.

Plus in my opinion 2.5 gallon isn't enough even for shrimps for long life so try and plan to buy bigger tank in future.
I guess I should have been more clear on my post (oops). With my previous fish, who died of Dropsy, I didn’t have a filter. I was extremely new to fish keeping. But I did weekly 50% water changes. I purchased a new fish earlier this week and I set up a filter for him and let the tank run fishless for a bit. I actually have the API liquid test kit and use stability and prime daily. I have no ammonia or nitrites in the tank and he is in the tank as of yesterday. Hope that all makes sense

Edit: Now I just saw your new post as I was tying this hahah.
 

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Nightshadethebetta said:
I guess I should have been more clear on my post (oops). With my previous fish, who died of Dropsy, I didn’t have a filter. I was extremely new to fish keeping. But I did weekly 50% water changes. I purchased a new fish earlier this week and I set up a filter for him and let the tank run fishless for a bit. I actually have the API liquid test kit and use stability and prime daily. I have no ammonia or nitrites in the tank and he is in the tank as of yesterday. Hope that all makes sense

Edit: Now I just saw your new post as I was tying this hahah.
You probably didn't have any readings because you didnt add ammonia in "empty" tank, now when fish is in, you will feed him, he will poop, and produce ammonia. just then cycling process will start. No ammonia=no food for bacteria=no cycle
 
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Nightshadethebetta

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appcontrol said:
You probably didn't have any readings because you didnt add ammonia in "empty" tank, now when fish is in, you will feed him, he will poop, and produce ammonia. just then cycling process will start. No ammonia=no food for bacteria=no cycle
Still seems odd though, because I use my tap water that contains ammonia in it. The first day I let my tank run, it had about .50ppm of ammonia in it. I even added a little fish food in it to help produce ammonia. It’s a confusing process lol.
 

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Nightshadethebetta said:
Still seems odd though, because I use my tap water that contains ammonia in it. The first day I let my tank run, it had about .50ppm of ammonia in it. I even added a little fish food in it to help produce ammonia. It’s a confusing process lol.
0.50 ppm is actually nothing and cycle process can't be finished in few days, it actually need 3-6 weeks to finish. And fuul establishing need from 2-3 months. In your place i woul do smaller water changes every two days for few weeks.
What are your nitrite and nitrate levels?

At firs stage you should see first readings of ammonia, then ammonia goes down nitrite goes up, after that ammonia is 0 but nitrite is high, after that nitrite starts going dow but nitrate up. And at the and ammonia is 0 nitrite is 0 and nitrate is from 5-20 then you are good.
 
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Nightshadethebetta

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appcontrol said:
0.50 ppm is actually nothing and cycle process can't be finished in few days, it actually need 3-6 weeks to finish. And fuul establishing need from 2-3 months. In your place i woul do smaller water changes every two days for few weeks.
What are your nitrite and nitrate levels?

At firs stage you should see first readings of ammonia, then ammonia goes down nitrite goes up, after that ammonia is 0 but nitrite is high, after that nitrite starts going dow but nitrate up. And at the and ammonia is 0 nitrite is 0 and nitrate is from 5-20 then you are good.
Ahh, okay. My nitrites have been at 0. Not sure with nitrates, I need to test that today. But thank you for helping me out Much appreciated!
 

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Nightshadethebetta said:
Ahh, okay. My nitrites have been at 0. Not sure with nitrates, I need to test that today. But thank you for helping me out Much appreciated!
You're welcome, i hope everything will go fine, and with time that you will upgrade your tank or tanks and enjoy more in this hobby. Just remember first rule in hobby is patience

And btw. dont use my explanation of ammonia nitrite nitrate like it's always like this, just google for more info. But end results must be every time a same.
 

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Its this simple:

You need to know exactly what the bioload of the tank is, i.e., how many nitrates a day youre producing. Once you know this, you will know how much water to change.

I currently have 5 bettas in their own 2.5 gallon tanks that have cycled sponge filters and heaters. They are open top tanks so they evaporate, they are all heavily planted AND I am light on the food. I replace about a fifth of the tank every 5 days due to evaporation and I change 30% every 3-4 weeks once the nitrates get to be about 40ppm.

Its true smaller tanks are harder to keep in check, BUT, when you have a single betta, a filter thats cycled, live plants and youre not overfeeding (mine get like 4 pellets a day alternated with brine shrimp and bloodworms plus I fast them a day on the weekend) you wont have a big bioload and wont need to do water changes as big or as often.
 

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As someone else who has ammonia in my water - it makes the plan for water changes more confusing. I would be guided my your test results. If you can do a 50% water change & have 0 ammonia 24 hours later then that is what I would do weekly (it is what I do on my 30+ gallon tank). If your filter can’t process that much ammonia then try maybe 25% weekly or twice a week.
 
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