How often must I change my 7.5 gal tank

FishOverseer909

So I've been struggling to keep neocaridina shrimp alive in my 7.5 gal tank since I bought 3 pygmy corydoras so I figured that perhaps due to the tanks small size and the sudden introduction of new fish the water might need to be changed more often than 20% once a week. So what do I do?

P.S the population is currently a nerite snail and 3 pygmy corydoras
 

mattgirl

What are your water tests telling you? Adding the new fish may have spiked the ammonia. Without testing we can't know what the problem is.
 

FishOverseer909

Unfortunately I'm in school currently so I can't test the water but if there was ammonia spike or another parameter spike what should I do?
 

mattgirl

Unfortunately I'm in school currently so I can't test the water but if there was ammonia spike or another parameter spike what should I do?
Take care of it with water changes. Do you still have any shrimp in this tank? how long have you had this tank up and running?
 

ProudPapa

mattgirl asked some good questions. If it's a new tank, and the shrimp haven't been in it long, there might not be enough biofilm for them to graze on. If that's the case, them dying after adding the corys could be a coincidence.
 

FishOverseer909

The tanks been operating for about 3 months however it's had shrimp in it for about 2 weeks and there's only a shrimp remaining
 

mattgirl

The tanks been operating for about 3 months however it's had shrimp in it for about 2 weeks and there's only a shrimp remaining
3 months should have been long enough to introduce shrimp. They are a bit more particular than fish about having perfect parameters. They aren't comfortable in high nitrates. Do you know how high yours are before doing your water changes? It is also possible adding the corys spiked the ammonia level. Shrimp would have been affected if that happened.

The best advice I can give you is keep a very close eye on the numbers. Make sure the tank is stabilized before introducing more shrimp. We will know more once you get home and can run the tests.
 

FishOverseer909

Ok do you think that maybe I should move my nerite snail to my other 26 gal tank in order to reduce nitrates
 

mattgirl

Ok do you think that maybe I should move my nerite snail to my other 26 gal tank in order to reduce nitrates
Moving it might be best but not because of the nitrates. The nerite is eating the same food the shrimp need. There will be more food for them if the nerite isn't getting to it first.
 

FishOverseer909

Ok well I guess I can move him but do think my assassin snails might kill him
 

mattgirl

Ok do you think that maybe I should move my nerite snail to my other 26 gal tank in order to reduce nitrates

Ok well I guess I can move him but do think my assassin snails might kill him
My recommendation would have been different if I had all the information before making it. Yes, you are taking a chance on the assassins snails eating your nerite if you move it to that tank.
 

Amatyi1

Moving it might be best but not because of the nitrates. The nerite is eating the same food the shrimp need. There will be more food for them if the nerite isn't getting to it first.
You can always drop pieces of algae wafers in there for food if you're worried about him getting eaten in another tank. But I agree, you definitely need to be testing your water. The results of your water test determine when and how much water to change. Your ammonia and nitrite levels should always remain zero and your nitrate should remain low (look up acceptable nitrate levels for your fish species) if your ammonia and nitrite levels are zero then you're feeding the appropriate amount and your bacteria is keeping up with the ammonia supply and converting them eventually to nitrates. when your nitrate levels get above the recommended amount for your fish species then you do a partial water change to lower them. I don't keep a tank without a testing kit. Both go hand in hand. There is so much happening in the water that you can't see that it's imperative to have a water testing kit. The test strips are easier to use but not as accurate as the test vials. I usually keep both because I don't always have time to do the vial water test.
 

FishOverseer909

You can always drop pieces of algae wafers in there for food if you're worried about him getting eaten in another tank. But I agree, you definitely need to be testing your water. The results of your water test determine when and how much water to change. Your ammonia and nitrite levels should always remain zero and your nitrate should remain low (look up acceptable nitrate levels for your fish species) if your ammonia and nitrite levels are zero then you're feeding the appropriate amount and your bacteria is keeping up with the ammonia supply and converting them eventually to nitrates. when your nitrate levels get above the recommended amount for your fish species then you do a partial water change to lower them. I don't keep a tank without a testing kit. Both go hand in hand. There is so much happening in the water that you can't see that it's imperative to have a water testing kit. The test strips are easier to use but not as accurate as the test vials. I usually keep both because I don't always have time to do the vial water test.
This is sort of an old thread and I already got rid of my snail since people were saying that it was possible that he was consuming all the biofilm
 

Amatyi1

This is sort of an old thread and I already got rid of my snail since people were saying that it was possible that he was consuming all the biofilm
Sorry I never even looked at the date. It just came up with the new post. Did you ever start testing your water?
 

FishOverseer909

Sorry I never even looked at the date. It just came up with the new post. Did you ever start testing your water?
It's fine I appreciate the fact that you tried to help but I don't quite understand what you mean by did you ever start testing your water
 

Amatyi1

It's fine I appreciate the fact that you tried to help but I don't quite understand what you mean by did you ever start testing your water
I noticed a few people telling you that you should test your water to let you know how often to do a partial water change. Everything in your tank that rots turns to ammonia. Uneaten food, dead plant leafs, fish pee. It's all ammonia which is harmful for fish. You can't see it though. They sell aquarium water testing strips that test the ammonia nitrite and nitrate levels. Instead of just changing out a certain amount of water each week you could test your water and your ammonia and nitrite (very deadly to fish) should be zero and when your nitrate (less deadly in small levels) gets high you do a partial water change to lower it. It leaves a lot less to chance by just changing out 20% each week.
The test strips are very easy to use and you just follow the directions and dip them in your tank and match the colors to their color chart. API test strips are the ones I use but they also have API Master test kit that has little vials you fill with your tank water. The Master test kit is more accurate than the strips but it also takes longer to do.
 

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