How Much Is Too Much?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by Faytaya, Jul 30, 2019.

  1. Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    Hi again, Desu here.
    I clean my tank and do a 50% water change every week. Problem is, I think my hornwort is suffering for it. New growth is slow and a bit brownish, and I've had places die off too. My nitrates never go above 10 ppm; is this causing the hornwort to be deficient? How much cleaning is too much for a planted tank??
     
  2. CheshireKat

    CheshireKatWell Known MemberMember

    Messages:
    1,145
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    California
    Ratings:
    +499
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    By "clean," what do you mean? 50% water changes weekly isn't too much, lots of people including myself do it. Do you add fertilizer to your tank?
     
  3. Lucyn

    LucynValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    385
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +174
    Experience:
    2 years
    Doing water changes frequently will be amazing for a your fish, just not so much the plants. Everyone's situation is different, so I couldn't give you a time frame on when or how much you should do it, even knowing the amount of your plants and the stocking of your fish. I heard a lot of people change the water around 20 nitrates, a nice balance for fish nutrients and healthy fish. What I personally do, is dose with fertilizer after every water change, since I have Discus, nitrates can be quite the issue. I find that I can do water changes three times a week or more if I directly dose ferts after, root tabs will help a load too! It'll be a little more expensive to dose ferts that frequently, but I'm sure your plants will appreciate it. Once a week shouldn't be a problem, like I said I personally do 50% water changes every 1-3 days, dosing ferts will go a long way.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    No ferts, no co2.
     
  5. Lucyn

    LucynValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    385
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +174
    Experience:
    2 years
    Unless you have a substantial bioload, even then your plants aren't going to thrive. I don't use co2, but I would say you do need Ferts to accomplish healthy, thriving plants. The products I found work the best are
    Niclog's Thrive +
    And
    Easy Green All in One Fertilizer
    As for root tabs, Niclog's Thrive Caps have provided lots of growth and root structure for me personally.
     
  6. Dechi

    DechiValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    478
    Ratings:
    +213
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    There’s your problem. You don’t need CO2 but plants do need nutrients. Thrive C is a good and complete fertilizer for low tech tanks (no CO2). The browning is a sign of nutrient deficiencies.

    Also, how’s your light and lighting schedule ?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    I have a tank by a glass door, so no lighting problems. I keep a small led on for about 10 hrs per day, sometimes longer. Thanks all for the help. I'll get on ferts right away. Lol I thought I'd have algae by now but nope.
     
  8. Lucyn

    LucynValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    385
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +174
    Experience:
    2 years
    To add on, having too much light and not enough Ferts will kill your plants also. You want to have a good balance, for example, light ferts or no ferts at all should have maybe 8 hours of lighting, or 6 hours of heavy light opposed to heavy ferts and c02 should have 12 hours of light, or 8-10 hours of heavy light. One thing out of balance will grant you an algae bloom, depending on how severe the imbalance is the more algae. Every situation is different, but I'm just giving you a general idea
     
  9. Dechi

    DechiValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    478
    Ratings:
    +213
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Check on youtube for Diy root tabs. They’re easy and cheap to make. You need both water column fertilizer (ex. Thrive C) and also root fertilizers.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    So basically I need to reverse my situation by fertilizing more often.
     
  11. Lucyn

    LucynValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    385
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Maine
    Ratings:
    +174
    Experience:
    2 years
    Basically yes You might have to play around with it a little, like I said every situation is different, that's why there's no definite answer of this is exactly what you should do. If you notice a large amount of algae, try and counteract that problem ie less/more lighting, less/more frequent fert dosing etc. Let's say you make a change and the algae got way worse, do the opposite of that change until you find a healthy balance.
     
  12. Dechi

    DechiValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    478
    Ratings:
    +213
    Experience:
    More than 10 years
    Start slow with fertilizers. Dosing too much, too fast will result in algae bloom. It’s a lot easier to go slow than trying to get rid of it.

    Achieving the right balance is a slow act. :)
     
  13. yinoma2001

    yinoma2001Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    420
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +180
    Experience:
    1 year
    I have hornwort. They started off pretty poorly as they were brownish. I clipped those off and let the new shoots grow. They needed some acclimation. Bear in mind, they are voracious nutrient eaters so if you don't give them nutrition besides fish byproduct waste, it won't thrive. I add Thrive to my tank and now they look luscious, green, and like a raccoon's tail in terms of bushiness.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    Funny thing is I put them in there to discourage algal growth. It works like a charm, but now I need to fertilize because there is no nutrition left in the water lol
     
  15. yinoma2001

    yinoma2001Valued MemberMember

    Messages:
    420
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +180
    Experience:
    1 year
    Yeah. I had them in my main tank but took them out to put in our betta tank (20G long). They help keep the water pristine (and offer cover for ember tetras who are in with the betta). They keep algae in check for sure, but if they are nutrient starved, they will shed.
     
  16. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    That explains the tons of needles I always see in my filter.
     
  17. BottomDweller

    BottomDwellerFishlore VIPMember

    Messages:
    9,381
    Location:
    England
    Ratings:
    +5,930
    Experience:
    5 to 10 years
    Having 10ppm nitrates means that there is enough nitrate for the plants. It means there is still nitrate in the water for the plants to use. If the plants were using up all the nitrate and needed more then you would have 0 nitrates before a water change.
    Water changes are good for plants. They replenish the minerals in the water.
     
  18. OP
    OP
    Faytaya

    FaytayaValued MemberMember

    Messages:
    400
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Kettering, Ohio
    Ratings:
    +165
    Experience:
    Just started
    I just dosed some flourish so we'll see how it goes.
     








Become a Fishlore Member