How many ghost/cherry shrimp could I keep in my 38g tank?

Betta_dude
  • #1
How many ghost/cherry shrimp could I ceep in my 38g tank? I'm thinking of keeping one of the two.
 
Amnagrla
  • #2
What else is IN the tank?
 
Barbrella
  • #3
You could have a vertible army of shrimps in a tank that size as long as you have no fish big enough to eat them of course!
 
COBettaCouple
  • #4
It looks like you don't have fish in the 38g.. you could keep hundreds of cherry shrimp in there.
 
Betta_dude
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Sorry, somehow I made a mistake and said cherry shrimp. I ment to say bamboo shrimp, my apologies.
 
COBettaCouple
  • #6
You could still fit a lot of them in there. Maybe put a dozen or 2 in and let them multiply.
 
Butters
  • #7
ya, you can fit a lot of ghost shrimp in a 38 g. I got 7 in my 10 g and I could still probably get way more. I've heard that they barley contribute to the bio-load at all.
 
Betta_dude
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Now I remember, I was thinking of cherry barbs when I made the thread. And shrimp don't count for the 1-inch/gallon right,(at least that's what ive been told) so how many could I keep with 38-inches of fish?
 
sirdarksol
  • #9
Betta_Dude, are we talking bamboo shrimp or ghost shrimp, because you say bamboo shrimp, but someone else said ghost shrimp. Bamboo shrimp get pretty big, and should probably count not so much for bioload but for space.

I would say one or two. Bamboo shrimp filter stuff out of the water column, and if you have too many of them, they might have problems getting enough food.
Also, make sure the tank has been set up for a few months before introducing them. You want the tank producing plenty of micro-flora and micro-fauna for the shrimp to eat.

If you choose to put more than two in the tank, add one at a time. If, at any point, you see them using their filter claws to sift through the substrate, you have too many, and they don't have enough food in the water column to survive.
 
Betta_dude
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
Both, but is one of them hardier than the other?
 
sirdarksol
  • #11
Bamboo shrimp live longer, but are a bit harder to keep. Ghost shrimp have shorter lives, but are prolific breeders under fairly simple circumstances, so you can easily set up a self-sustaining colony.

You could easily do both. Some Java moss, some driftwood for the bamboo shrimp to perch on (especially near the filter output), and both would likely be happy.
 
Betta_dude
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
Thanks.
 
sirdarksol
  • #13
A bit more info:
You can target feed them with food made for filter-feeders, but they will miss the majority of what you put in the water. This can seriously affect the water quality as the rest of the stuff rots. However, if you see them scrounging for food, you should probably take the chance, since it's really bad for them to have to scrounge for long.
 
Betta_dude
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Is their something you can give bamboo shrimp if your not sure there is enough food for them?
 
sirdarksol
  • #15
I merged the bamboo shrimp thread with this one, since this one is getting more attention..
Above is my answer for the feeding question. Any food made for filter feeders should work.

Also, to answer a question I missed before, no, there is no possible way that a bamboo shrimp would hurt a fish. It may eat small fish eggs, especially if it is forced to forage, but I would give the ghost shrimp a bigger chance of doing that.
 
COBettaCouple
  • #16
Live plants are good for the shrimp since it gives them perches and provides tiny food for them to eat off of the plants. Java moss, water sprite or other easy to grow plants can be good and I like to drop in pieces of Omega One veggie wafers for the shrimp.
 

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