How many gallons for 100 dollars

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plati221

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okay so im trying to buy a new aquarium but dont know what size or fish im putting i know you set up the tank a day before to adjust everything and going to try freshwater fish for the aquarium so what sort of tank should i get and would be nice from about 100 to 200 dollars and so far this site has helped me alot with this soo any tips would be appreciated and what kind of fish would be good and note i prefer smll fish than big ones
 

JustinF

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allamericangirl

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ok, a freshwater tank is SOOO much easier to take care of and less expensive (saltwater has to have salt, heater, fitler, etc. I'm not saying that freshwater doesn't have this stuff, it's just easier to take care of and less expensive).

i would get a 30 gallon tank and have a variety of barbs, gouramies, smaller fish, etc. Check your LPS for what they carry and read the internet to find out what fish can go together.
 
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Lucy

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Hi plati221
Before deciding on more fish, I hope you consider getting proper tanks for the fish you already have.
Here's a great place to start doing some research:
Beginner Links
Four Methods of Fish Less Cycling

I'm sorry, I know this doesn't answer your questions, but does address a misconception you have. There's more to keeping fish than setting up a tank and letting in run for a couple of days. The links above will help

Good luck!
 

Kunsthure

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Welcome to Fish Lore!

Definitely research the nitrogen cycle and do a fishless cycle--your fishies will thank you. . Iirc we bought a TopFin 20 gallon kit, which includes a filter, light, hood, and heater for just under $100 at Petsmart. I think my 37g kit was around $150. But you can often find great deals on craigslist. I found a 55 gallon complete with filter, light, hood, air pump, heater, decorations *and* stand for $160!

Zebra danios are small and very active, as well as hardy. Neon tetras are pretty fragile and often die in newly established tanks. Pygmy corys or even regular corys are great bottomdwellers with lots of personality. Gold barbs and cherry barbs stay under three inches. There are many kinds of tetras besides neons, flame tetras are really pretty and are about 1.5" or so. Harlequin rasboras and celestial pearl danios are also smaller fish that are very pretty.

When I was first trying to stock my tanks I went to the Petco and Petsmart websites and looked at all the fish and researched the ones I thought looked good. You can also do the same thing at thatfishplace.com and liveaquaria.com because they have even more fish.

ETA: wow, I just read your profile and the fish you already have are not going to work out together in a 10 gallon. A lot of people here won't put one of those sharks in anything less than a 55 gallon because they are so territorial.

-Lisa
 
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plati221

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thnx justin but im not really comprehending the nitrogyn cylce here i dont know what to do
 

Goldwing_Don

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+1 Lucy
Welcome plati221
Please read the links above before putting fish in a tank.
Their lives depend on it.
 

Kunsthure

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plati221 said:
thnx justin but im not really comprehending the nitrogyn cylce here i dont know what to do
What, specifically, are you having trouble with? We can walk you through it step by step.

-Lisa
 

JustinF

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I would first go out and get your self a test kit like API master test kit, it is a liquid test kit to tell you how your water readings are.(it probably seems a little complicated, but trust me it's not) It's not really to hard to use, but if your not comfortable using it ask your local fish store they can also do tests for you for free. (most of the time) I guess I'll try to explain it in easy terms: the fish and food make waste called ammonia-bad(test for this) and there are things that are in nature that change fish waste and food(ammonia) into nitrites-bad (test for this) and lastly there are the good stuff called nitrate-good (test for this) and it takes time for a tank to convert all of the bad to good. In fish less you have to have something that creates those bad things (Ammonia & nitrite) eventually it turns the bad stuff good but it takes time. Nitrate (good stuff) is only good in small amounts thus the need for water changes. (use a siphon hose to draw the water out of the tank) then add fresh dechlorinated water, amount and when depends on the size of your tank. It usually takes a month to a month and a half to get a full cycle. Readings you want to see Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, and Nitrate 5 - 20 IMO. good luck hope this helps a little.
 
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Lucy

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plati221 said:
thnx justin but im not really comprehending the nitrogyn cylce here i dont know what to do
I had a really hard time understanding the cycling process when I first started. I must have read that link 100 times before it finally sank in. lol


Here's a basic explanation of the nitrogen cycle:
First your ammonia (from fish waste and left over food) will rise.

In a few weeks bacteria will start to develop. This bacteria converts ammonia to nitrIte. You'll begin to see the nitrIte levels rise and the ammonia levels start to drop.

After a few more weeks a different kind of bacteria begins to develop that convert nitrItes to NitrAtes. You'll begin see the nitrAte levels rise and the nitrIte levels drop.

Ammonia and nitrItes are toxic to your fish.
So until your cycle is complete and enough bacteria develops to process the toxins, you need to keep the levels down with 50% daily water changes.
If your pH differs greatly from tap to tank 2 25% changes a day would be safer.
Using Prime as your water conditioner will detox the ammonia for 24 hrs between water changes.
When you having readings of 0 on both ammonia and nitrItes with some nitrAtes showing, your cycle is done.

Cycling can take a month, give or take a few weeks.

Hope that helped break it down a bit for you. I know it's really confusing, but you'll get it.
 

Kunsthure

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Lucy gave a great explanation--she rocks!

The most humane way to cycle a tank is without fish. The old school way was to buy some hearty fish and basically use them to provide the ammonia which comes from their waste. Many places that sell fish will still advise that method. But using pure ammonia like you'd find at Home Depot, using fish food or using a decomposing shrimp are the preferred ways to go.

It takes patience to cycle a tank, I know it can be hard to stare at an empty fish tank for a month or more but it's well worth it. Your fish will live longer, healthier and ultimately happier lives if they're not subjected to ammonia and nitrites.

Feel free to ask as many questions as you have, everyone here is more than happy to help you!

-Lisa
 

kuhliLoachFan

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Maybe a video on the nitrogen cycle?


Skip to 1:09 to skip the useless "about us" stuff.

W
 

flyin-lowe

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Another thing that can help with the cycle is to get some established filter media. Do you know anybody else that has fish tanks? They could give you some of there filter media to speed things up. Or you could put your filter media in their tank for three to four weeks and that will help out as well.
Also as far as how much money to spend I am a firm believer in buying used stuff if you know what to look for. Aquarium supplies are one of those things that people pay good money for and then tend to sell them cheap. It is not uncommon to find 55-90 gallon tanks set up with everything within your price range. If you buy all new stuff (stand, hood, filter,gravel, etc) you won't get much in your price range. I know my LFS often times has sales and their tanks are $1 per gallon. This is for the tank only.
I bought a 120 gallon with stand, hood, and lights for $200.00. What I got was probably close to $1000.00 new.
 
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