How Good Is This Male Sunset Micariff?

  1. Supreme Sawk

    Supreme Sawk Valued Member Member

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    Two pictures there. I decided to take a second picture with him out of water because there is a lot of algae on the glass that dilutes his colour a bit. The picture of him in my hand may make him look a little more lime-ish because of the bright lighting but it looks better than the one in the tank. If need be I can take another picture of him but in natural sunlight and not hued by artificial lighting.
     
  2. Prism

    Prism Well Known Member Member

    What a beauty! You shouldn't be taking him out of the water, it could cause major stress, and problems. Good luck with him!
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Supreme Sawk

    Supreme Sawk Valued Member Member

    Oh trust me, I've had my fair share of problems with taking them out of the water. These days if I ever do it's only for a few seconds at a time and if I have to hold them in my hand for longer than that then I dip them in the water again so they can get a fresh breath of oxygen. I also never pick them up; if I drop them I don't touch them, I slowly coerce them into the net gently where they get put back into the tank, and nothing happens to them. I think it's when you try and pick them up that you have the most potential to physically injure them.

    So would he be good enough to selectively breed?
     


  4. Prism

    Prism Well Known Member Member

    Be careful about him squirming around! I have no experience with taking fish out of the water, I haven't really tried. I don't really want to.

    If you are wanting to breed, find a female guppy, same looking color, and I think you would be good, but how large is your tank, I wouldn't recommend breeding in smaller tanks.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Supreme Sawk

    Supreme Sawk Valued Member Member

    He was actually pretty good. He sat there and let me take a picture of him, after that though he started squirming so I let him go. He still seems a little dazed but apart from that he's acting normal.

    I have a 30 gallon with a ton of random-bred fry already, I'm only planning on keeping a trio per brood, and that's if I deem it to be good enough. If I was to start selectively breeding then I'd get a 10 gallon and raise the selectively bred fry in there. I'd look for a younger female so that she doesn't give birth to more than about 20-30 fry (as older specimens give birth to more fry, many older females routinely give birth to 60-80 fry per brood, and sometimes reach over 100, and I'm definitely not doing that). From what I've read a 10 gallon is sufficient to raise 20-30 fry to about 2 months old as long as you keep an eye on parameters, after which I'd sell most of them and keep only the best ones. If I actually thought I had too many before I could sell them then I'd divert some of them to the main tank and enforce stricter culling rules i.e. stricter size/development requirements. Any bentbacks would also be culled on sight.
     
  6. Prism

    Prism Well Known Member Member

    Yes, get a 10g, for quarantine, and raise them in there. When they grow up, you could possible sell them, or rehome them, or maybe give them off to some friends that like guppies. Just use the 30g for breeding.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Supreme Sawk

    Supreme Sawk Valued Member Member

    The 30g is the community tank, random breeding happens in there. The male and female I want to breed together will be bred in the 10 gallon, the fry will be born and raised there, and only retired or currently unused ones will ever visit the main tank. A week after the pair have been together the male will be taken out of the 10g and will return to the 30g, and same for the female once she gives birth. The male can be used again if I feel a backcross should be done. Unfortunately the female is no longer a valid breeder because she has been around other males and could be impregnated by them. The fry are raised all together until they get to a month old, then they are separated by sex so that the males can't impregnate females and the males don't waste energy on reproduction and can continue growing at a fast rate. At 2 months, most of them will be sold to the LFS, and the few best ones of each gender will be kept (still separate), and at 3 months the final breeding pair will be decided, the ones that aren't used for breeding either go into the main tank or to the LFS, and the two best of each gender are put together and rinse and repeat. Any bentbacks at any stage will be culled on sight.

    Any problems?