How do you handle quarantining and medicating new fish?

chadcf

I recently had a fun time adding some new corys to my tank. I quarantined them for 2 weeks in a 10 gallon tank before adding them to my main tank, but once in the main tank 4/6 of them died over a period of weeks. They also took several of my existing corys with them. I suspected a parasite and treated everything with api general cure and have had no more deaths since.

I'm now a little gun shy adding new fish and I'm curious what precautions everyone takes. How long do you quarantine? Do you give any medication to new fish in quarantine by default? Does it matter if they were wild caught vs tank raised?
 

Seamus111

How did you add them, drip or a plop n drop? I drip acclimate all fish to any new tank. Yes, it's good to give them an antibiotic, specially if wild caught. Strange, catfish are usually a very hardy breed.
 
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Dechi

I try to buy from good LFS that quarantine fish in their store so I don’t have to do it. And I don’t.
 
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chadcf

Yeah unfortunately my trusted LFS closed down a few months ago. I made a road trip an hour away to buy these from a store I've never shopped at before.

Also I spoke too soon, doing a water change just now and had a floating cory. Sigh. No sunken belly this time and I hadn't seen any weird behavior lately.
 
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Zach72202

I have a lot of tanks, so I keep a 10g tank open for QT, but that doesn't necessarily mean meds. This tank is well cycled and I can see it everyday as it is next to a tank that I am working with baby fish in, so I am always by it.

I use this 10 specifically because it is a very established and stable tank that is pretty barebones and is a great size for dosing meds if need be. It is also great because as an established tank it is good for letting fish adjust to your water.

I also like to do an observation period of about two weeks prior to meds, as I get new fish in spurts. This two weeks gives me time to find anything else I wish to add to this tank prior to any meds as well as giving me time to check out the fish I have in there to see if there are any issues.

Currently I have in there:
3x CW98 Corydoras
2x Limia Nigrofasciatus (Humpback Limia)
1x Peacock Eel

This week I will be getting in 12x CW010 Orange Laser Corydoras, which I will be putting into the 'observatory'.

I will give them time to acclimate, as putting them into new water and meds may cause stress, which I do not want to do right away. I would like to limit my stressors to as few as possible at a given time.

I like to give it about a 4-5 weeks in QT - 2 weeks observation/accumulation for the QT, then the week of Levamisole, week off so any eggs hatch that the first treatment didn't kill, then week 2 of levamisole that kills off any young parasites in the fish. If I feel iffy about it, I do some waterchanges to remove any meds and have another week of observation with them, which then they normally resume normalcy as there is no more stressor.

As for meds, I generally don't run into much bacterially as I like to keep water clean and minimal visible waste, buy I do keep on hand a form of Erythromycin (Mardel Maracyn is my go-to, but API E.M. is good too).

I generally like to de-worm everything. This is my stickler policy in my fish room as I have run into internal parasites too many times, so I just do it as a blanket after an observation period. My personal go-to med is Levamisole HCL, which may be controversial as it is an extremely strong med, often used on farm animals, but I find it to do an excellent job. I have used API General Cure and Mardel Paracleanse too, which are good, but I find them to be a bit more expensive and places near me don't carry it too often. They contain Praziquentinal and Metronidizole, which you can buy on your own, but I still prefer Levamisole HCL as controversial as that may be.

In addition to this, I have learned that treating without reason is not the best idea. The best thing you can do is watch your fish and see if you should treat them. If you bring 3 more corys to add to your display school, then maybe doing an observation for a few weeks to make sure they check out is good to do! Maybe they won't need meds and it will save you money, time, and save them stress too! Of course if you were doing like 50 neon tetras, to check them all out is of course not very realistic to most, which then I understand blanket treatment, but just know it is not always the best option.
 
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