how do you do your bettas' 100% water change?

armadillo
  • #1
When my male was really sick, I did a lot of reading on betta-only forums and sites, and 99% of them advised to do full water changes 1x per week. I don't like the idea, as you'd need to put the fish in a temporary container each time, and wouldn't the fish grow mistrusting if once per week he was caught in a net?

But I am curious, how would you go about doing 100% water changes. I mean how do you get rid of the last bit of water? Short of turning the tank upside down or waiting 5 days for it to evaporate, I don't see how.
 
ricktavious
  • #2
To ease the stress of getting a fish out of water, what I do is let them swim to the top and then gently "scoop" them up into a little cup (I keep the ones that they come in). They don't like it, of course, but it does the trick better than a net IMO.
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
For sure that sounds less stressful. Thanks for the tip.

And they've not grown wary of your cup? It's not a struggle to catch them each time?
 
Chief_waterchanger
  • #4
Could probably train them to enjoy the cup by just putting a single bloodworm, or bit of their favorite food. Not enough to constitute more than a nibble, just a small treat into the cup before you scoop them. (I've never done this suggestion so it is only a theory, but we all know our bettas have certain behaviors when we approach the tank with the food container.. )
 
Yuni
  • #5
I scoop mine into a plastic cup while I empty their tanks :/ although since I don't have a net yet I lure them to the top with some food then scoop em'
 
Barbrella
  • #6
I stir, then vacuum the gravel, then siphon the water out. No I don't get every drop out, but I see no harm in that.

I scoop out the fish in a cup too, but one of them is stressed by this. Luckily he's getting a 5 gal next week, so no more scooping for him!
 
Tazmiche
  • #7
Maybe the scooping out bit depends on the individual fish. I say this because with Spot being gormless at feed times and dropping his food I thought i'd try your idea of the dish. I put feed in the small white dish and Spot swam into it at the top of the water, was quite happy and dish was high. BTW he COMPLETELY ignored the food but seemed to enjoy the pot!! ( nutter!!) Flame however would probably jump and sink his teeth into my neck whilst pinning me to the floor!!

Just a thought. I personally have all fresh water near tank and vacuum to about a 2 inch depth then quickly top up!
 
COBettaCouple
  • #8
when we've had to do a 100% change, we've used the "here's a treat, don't mind the cup" method with sulking after being the only 'problem' but it is something we hardly ever do.
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
Could probably train them to enjoy the cup by just putting a single bloodworm, or bit of their favorite food. Not enough to constitute more than a nibble, just a small treat into the cup before you scoop them.

Great idea!

(I've never done this suggestion so it is only a theory, but we all know our bettas have certain behaviors when we approach the tank with the food container.. )

he he he. I hear ya!

ROFL!
BTW he COMPLETELY ignored the food but seemed to enjoy the pot!! ( nutter!!) Flame however would probably jump and sink his teeth into my neck whilst pinning me to the floor!!
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
And they still havne't worked it out? That's what I want. I don't want them to be wary of me, or of coming to the surface, basically. So am glad that your fish still come up and don't really mind.
I scoop mine into a plastic cup while I empty their tanks :/ although since I don't have a net yet I lure them to the top with some food then scoop em'

OK, so that's the fish transfer question sorted out, but how do you get every last drop out of the tank?
 
COBettaCouple
  • #11
take everything out and put it in a big container with either tank water or treated tap water to keep it wet then empty the tank out with vacuuming, scooping, however you need to.
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #12
But after a while, when there's say, 1cm of water left, you can't really vacuum anymore (well I can't), and it's the same for scooping. So there's always 1cm deep water left.
 
COBettaCouple
  • #13
the tank's light enough then to pour out the remaining water into a tub or sink and then dry it off inside with a towel or paper towels.


But after a while, when there's say, 1cm of water left, you can't really vacuum anymore (well I can't), and it's the same for scooping. So there's always 1cm deep water left.
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #14
Oh, that means removing gravel and everything? I guess that means no planted tank if I want to do my 100% water change regime. I think I'll leave the 100% water change to cases of finrot, then.

Thanks, Dave. You know am not that practically-minded, LOL!
 
COBettaCouple
  • #15
yea, the only time we do 100% water changes is due to disease or moving.

Oh, that means removing gravel and everything? I guess that means no planted tank if I want to do my 100% water change regime. I think I'll leave the 100% water change to cases of finrot, then.

Thanks, Dave. You know am not that practically-minded, LOL!
 
bhcaaron
  • #16
Would it not be better to keep healthier water by continually doing larger water changes? But, then again, aren't you starting a cycle all over again? (Yes I'm now reading on Bettas too... I had it all planned out for my salties, but, now am having a dreadful time deciding on a freshie)
 
armadillo
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
I think I only want to do it in case of disease, but it's good to know I know how to. So I just syphoned, and it ended with barely any water, so no need to turn tank upside down even.

Made a boo-boo, though. I put my little female in a jar during that maintenance and because I felt guilty at my betrayal, I gave her some pellets to keep her occupied. But I also felt bad that she was in the jar, so I wanted to hurry with the maintenance, so I distractedly put the pellets in. When I put her back in her tank, her belly was huuuuuuge. I'd put in faaaar too many pellets. She's OK now, though. Needless to say she was fasted the next day.

Aaron, if you're already such a great researcher prior to even having any fish, I think your fish are really really really lucky to have you. You'll make a great betta dad.
Would it not be better to keep healthier water by continually doing larger water changes? But, then again, aren't you starting a cycle all over again? (Yes I'm now reading on Bettas too... I had it all planned out for my salties, but, now am having a dreadful time deciding on a freshie)
 
COBettaCouple
  • #18
Once the tank is cycled, 25% weekly pwc's combined with cleaning the tank has kept our tanks clear and healthy. Large water changes really are best with things such as clearing out meds, sicknesses, etc. - things that can really affect the water chemistry and/or just need a bunch of fresh water.

Would it not be better to keep healthier water by continually doing larger water changes? But, then again, aren't you starting a cycle all over again? (Yes I'm now reading on Bettas too... I had it all planned out for my salties, but, now am having a dreadful time deciding on a freshie)
 
bhcaaron
  • #19
Aaron, if you're already such a great researcher prior to even having any fish, I think your fish are really really really lucky to have you. You'll make a great betta dad.
:'( thank you! hehe

Once the tank is cycled, 25% weekly pwc's combined with cleaning the tank has kept our tanks clear and healthy. Large water changes really are best with things such as clearing out meds, sicknesses, etc. - things that can really affect the water chemistry and/or just need a bunch of fresh water.

Thanks COBetta. Do you breed your Bettas? How often do they spawn? Once a year?
 
pamd
  • #20
when we've had to do a 100% change, we've used the "here's a treat, don't mind the cup" method with sulking after being the only 'problem' but it is something we hardly ever do.

I use a little clear plastic cup frequently for partial water changes. Instead of netting my male betta when I needed to do a big (85%) water change, I easily scooped him up in the plastic cup.

That was my grace period, first time only! He only needed to be in the cup for three minutes. Well, we know how smart our bettas ARE! I had to scoop him up a little later that same day, he was terrified of the cup and soooo difficult to catch! He again had to stay in it a few minutes, and he was glaring at me every second. After I put him back into his home (at the time, a two-gallon bowl), he was very obviously scared of the cup that afternoon every time I added water using it.

The next day, the little guy had forgotten all about the incidents! I needed to do another partial water change and used the cup. He just swam around peacefully like nothing had happened. They're so endearing.

Would it not be better to keep healthier water by continually doing larger water changes? But, then again, aren't you starting a cycle all over again? (Yes I'm now reading on Bettas too... I had it all planned out for my salties, but, now am having a dreadful time deciding on a freshie)

If you're still deciding about a freshie, think betta! For one thing, as mentioned, you'll be a great betta dad, and we all like to see that. For another, I suspect you'll really love bettas.

I had freshwater aquariums as a kid and a very healthy marine aquarium for five years as a young adult. No offense to any community freshwater fans -- they're fascinating -- but the freshwater fish didn't come close in personality and beauty of the salt fish, in my opinion. The marine aquarium was, of course, a whole lot more work. I'd still love to have one again. I had very few fish and a few invertebrates, and they all lived good long lives.

I got the "fish craving" again when my boss put a betta in a bowl in her office. I liked her little guy so much that I got one of my own for my office. Spent $6 on the fish and $20 on the bowl, some pretty marbles, water conditioner and food.

Well, here I am three months later. Same fish, $100 extra in a better home for him. That's how much I love the guy. They'll do that to you.

I bought an Eclipse three-gallon aquarium, which has filter, lighting, and heater for him. Perfect for a betta (at least I hope so). He's more entertaining and personable than a whole freshwater community tank, in my opinion. No offense again to community freshwater or saltwater enthusiasts (and I still count myself as one), and certainly no slight toward my beloved long-departed marine fish and invertebrates, but I think this is my favorite fish ever.

Sure, he has to live by himself in the new expanded (but still tiny) home. He's so fun that I don't need another fish, right?

Oh no, here he's gotten to me again. Well, not for him, but for me. He's not lonely, but now he's led me to a new craving. Now I want either three Corys or three Kuhlis to share a home with him. But I'd need a 10-gallon tank for the betta and those clowns, I think.

Bottom line: Bettas are amazingly smart, cool and beautiful, even in the eyes of a marine aquarist. And although they can't share their tanks with a lot of different types of tankmates, those tank mates can be very amusing.
 
bhcaaron
  • #21
Thank you PamD. That is just what I wanted to hear. It almost feels like a betreyal to my future salties to begin with a freshie, but, I have an itch that I just have to scratch and not enough money to start my saltie yet. I further love the fact that we're from the same planet... Arizona WOOT WOOT! I live in Bullhead City and hour away from Lake Havasu City, the fourth hottest city in the world. You live in the #1 city most often struck by lightning in the world.
 

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