How Do Y'all Get Your Wood To Stay?

peighton

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I have 3 small-ish pieces of driftwood that I want to lean/stack together to make one big piece. It keeps falling over. Even with glue but maybe I need to give it more time to dry? I have dirt capped with gravel and no other rocks. I just wanted the wood and plants. I'm adding plants when the get delivered at the end of the week, so I'm trying to get the wood to stay before then. Thank you for any help!

Edit: has anyone used a hot glue gun before? The green machine on YouTube does a lot.
 

NC122606

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peighton said:
I have 3 small-ish pieces of driftwood that I want to lean/stack together to make one big piece. It keeps falling over. Even with glue but maybe I need to give it more time to dry? I have dirt capped with gravel and no other rocks. I just wanted the wood and plants. I'm adding plants when the get delivered at the end of the week, so I'm trying to get the wood to stay before then. Thank you for any help!
Have you tried zip ties?

A bit off topic but, my driftwood would not stay down and would float after boiling. So I toke a rock and zip tied it to it and dug it in the sand! That is why I am suggesting them.
 
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peighton

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NC122606 said:
A bit off topic but, my driftwood would not stay down and would float after boiling. So I toke a rock and zip tied it to it and dug it in the sand! That is why I am suggesting them.
I haven't! Maybe I'll try some dark ones that can be hidden. I eventually want moss to grow on the wood and that would hide them. Thank you! Maybe I will need to buy some large rocks to keep it from tipping too.
 

MaximumRide14

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Fishing line works really well with keeping stuff down too. It's clear enough and hard to see if you're not looking for it. You can also use it to tie the moss to the wood, and eventually the moss will grow around it. Rocks can be used to keep decor/wood in place, and it sounds like it would still look very natural.
 

Salem

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You could try using silicone to connect them to eachother and letting it cure for a day to keep them in position. You can get a small tube of 100% silicone caulking at most hardware stores- it's aquarium safe and a lot cheaper than aquarium sealant. If you get clear it would be pretty easy to hide. I think letting moss grow over the wood would also reinforce it.

To keep them down you could maybe silicone it to a tile or flat rock- assuming that it isn't becoming waterlogged. Depending on the size and shape of the wood you could possibly attach a suction cup or two to it and attach it to the bottom. I'm assuming you probably dont want to disturb your substrate though but it could work in a future tank!
 
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peighton

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MaximumRide14 said:
Fishing line works really well with keeping stuff down too. It's clear enough and hard to see if you're not looking for it. You can also use it to tie the moss to the wood, and eventually the moss will grow around it. Rocks can be used to keep decor/wood in place, and it sounds like it would still look very natural.
I'll try that! Are there certain types of rocks that are better than others? Sorry, total newb to real plants and decor, so sorry if that seems silly

Salem said:
You could try using silicone to connect them to eachother and letting it cure for a day to keep them in position. You can get a small tube of 100% silicone caulking at most hardware stores- it's aquarium safe and a lot cheaper than aquarium sealant. If you get clear it would be pretty easy to hide. I think letting moss grow over the wood would also reinforce it.

To keep them down you could maybe silicone it to a tile or flat rock- assuming that it isn't becoming waterlogged. Depending on the size and shape of the wood you could possibly attach a suction cup or two to it and attach it to the bottom. I'm assuming you probably don't want to disturb your substrate though but it could work in a future tank!
Thank you! I didn't know that was a thing, I'll definitely look for some silicone. Does it work if the wood is already water logged and been in the tank?
 

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peighton said:
I'll try that! Are there certain types of rocks that are better than others? Sorry, total newb to real plants and decor, so sorry if that seems silly
Not silly at all! Here is a good little aquarium rock resource
 

MaximumRide14

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peighton said:
I'll try that! Are there certain types of rocks that are better than others? Sorry, total newb to real plants and decor, so sorry if that seems silly
Lol it's okay. I prefer to get rocks from actual pet or fish stores. They usually have a pretty good selection based on which sizes you want, especially if the stores are specifically for fish. I usually don't go for rocks you get yourself outside because the minerals could change the pH of the tank water. There's a way to tell whether it's safe or not using a vinegar test, but I don't risk it. It sometimes depends on the area you're from. Since I'm in the desert, most rocks have minerals that I wouldn't want to put in aquariums.
 

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peighton said:
Thank you! I didn't know that was a thing, I'll definitely look for some silicone. Does it work if the wood is already water logged and been in the tank?
tbh I have never tried to silicone something thats wet but my instinct makes me think it would at least be more difficult. It could be worth a try if you have some extra pieces of wet wood to experiment on
 
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peighton

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MaximumRide14 said:
Lol it's okay. I prefer to get rocks from actual pet or fish stores. They usually have a pretty good selection based on which sizes you want, especially if the stores are specifically for fish. I usually don't go for rocks you get yourself outside because the minerals could change the pH of the tank water. There's a way to tell whether it's safe or not using a vinegar test, but I don't risk it. It sometimes depends on the area you're from. Since I'm in the desert, most rocks have minerals that I wouldn't want to put in aquariums.
I've looked at rocks at my LFS but they have SO many. I'm currently in a country with English not as the primary language so getting info at the LFS is hard haha I'll do some more research, not sure what local rocks would do to my water.

Salem said:
Not silly at all! Here is a good little aquarium rock resource
Thank you!
 

MaximumRide14

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peighton said:
I've looked at rocks at my LFS but they have SO many. I'm currently in a country with English not as the primary language so getting info at the LFS is hard haha I'll do some more research, not sure what local rocks would do to my water.
Check out that rock source and you may have some luck with the rocks at the LFS
 

Julabean

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peighton said:
I have 3 small-ish pieces of driftwood that I want to lean/stack together to make one big piece. It keeps falling over. Even with glue but maybe I need to give it more time to dry? I have dirt capped with gravel and no other rocks. I just wanted the wood and plants. I'm adding plants when the get delivered at the end of the week, so I'm trying to get the wood to stay before then. Thank you for any help!

Edit: has anyone used a hot glue gun before? The green machine on YouTube does a lot.
I used the cigarette filter method. You take a new cigarette or tube, break the filter off, peel off the paper around the fuzzy cotton. The cotton is what you'll be using. Use super glue gel to keep the pieces together for now. Insert part of the cotton in between areas where the wood meets, but still has a gap. Make sure it's in there snug. Apply super glue to the cotton, press onto it to make sure it's not going to move. In a few minutes it will be dried completely and then that baby's not going anywhere! Repeat at other meeting points as needed. You can cover up the areas with anubias. I personally used this technique on my spiderwood sculpture I made with 2 pieces. Good Luck and I hope this helps
 

Arrakis

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I used some dark brown thread to tie a couple of pieces together then placed some java fern around it and it has stayed in place pretty well.
 

angelcraze

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Salem said:
tbh I have never tried to silicone something thats wet but my instinct makes me think it would at least be more difficult. It could be worth a try if you have some extra pieces of wet wood to experiment on
It's better to let it cure for a week. My rock cave eventually feel apart after a year or so. I'd try the zip ties if you could hide them.
 

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You can screw them together with stainless steel screws too, predrill, and countersink the heads. If you do it right you can hide the screw heads pretty easily. Regular sheetrock or decking screws will rust/ corrode...so it has to be stainless.
 
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