How about a full water change?

lokky.funky

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Hi guyz,

Could someone give me instructions on changing the water fully? I do it every 10 days. Is that advisable?

The water is clear, but it smells bad. So I do full water changes every 10 days.

Please let me know exactly how to go about this task.

Thanks for the ever growing support.

Lokky
 

Gunnie

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Make sure your tank is cycled. If so, you don't need to do 100% water changes. Try putting some carbon in your filter for a couple of days to see if the smell goes away. Also, vacuum half or at least a fourth of your gravel each time you do tank maintenance. This should help with the smell also, and will eliminate any bad bacteria from forming pockets in your gravel.
 

Isabella

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As Gunnie has said, if your tank is cycled you probably don't need 100% water changes every 10 days or so. If you have a test for nitrate, it can pretty much tell you many and how large water changes you need. The higher and the faster rising the nitrate, the more and/or the larger water changes you need.

One thing to keep in mind is that if your tank water has a pH significantly different from that of the water from your water source that you'll use for water changes, the fish may experience a pH shock due to a sudden pH change as a result of a full, 100%, water change. As long as your nitrate is as low as possible, 0 at best, you don't need 100% water changes. By vacuuming the gravel - where most of the fish wastes accumulate - you're removing these wastes and thereby lowering nitrate.

However, if you absolutely want to / have to perform these 100% water changes, why don't you perform 50% water changer every 5 days? This will lessen pH shock if there should be any.

P.S. Smaller but more frequent water changes are safer than less frequent but larger ones. For example, instead of doing a 30% water change every 2 weeks, it would be better to do a 15% water change every week. Or, for example, instead of 60% every 2 weeks, do 30% every week.
 

Boxermom

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For my small tanks, I do a 90% water change weekly, and at least 50% on my larger tanks. You shouldn't have a smell, though, and if you do, you need to find out why and eliminate the problem.
 

Isabella

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Either too much feeding or an overstocked tank could cause the smell. If you feed too much, a lot of food may be left uneaten and rotting on the tank's bottom.

Boxermom, while large water changes are not bad as long as the pH and temperature of the new water are the same as those of the tank water, I think that if one has a lightly stocked tank and nitrate at 0 there is really no need to be performing 100% or 90% weekly water changes. Of course, it is up to every individual, but that's just what I personally think.

Suppose the new water has a very different pH and you change 100% of it - the fish could get sick from that.
 

Boxermom

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All of my small tanks are lightly stocked. The issue for me is that I wouldn't want to be swimming in a toilet bowl and don't think my fish should be either. As long as you are using the same water, pH shouldn't be an issue. And if its done regularly, It shouldn't shock the fish at all. I make sure the temp is the same, declor, and replace. Have never had a problem, rarely lose fish, have no issues with parasites or illness, and my fish are all very healthy.
 
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lokky.funky

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I think the full water change have caused a mini cycle. My fishes are not looking healthy at all. I'm changing 20 to 30 % of water twice daily. Will this help?

My fishes are flashing at the objects
 

Isabella

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Six hundred dollars? That's impossible ... I think you mean SIXTY dollars, right? I see you live in India, so I don't know how much you'd pay for shipping if you could order the test kit online from America. But if shipping charges wouldn't amount to much, here is a complete freshwater test kit for only $13:
 

Isabella

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Oh ... lol, sorry for that Anyway, if you can afford a test kit at some point in the future, it is very good to have it. If you ever have any trouble with your tank, a test kit helps clarify many things and it helps answer many questions.
 
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lokky.funky

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I think there are two types of test kits... am i right?

the strip kind

and the other ?? am not sure..

which one is better?
 
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lokky.funky

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Can you be little clearer as I have zero idea about these test kits..

I haven't even seen them before...
 

Isabella

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Liquid test kit if far more accurate that test strips. Please get the liquid tests if you can. The liquid tests work this way: You have a bottle with a test solution and you have a test tube. The liquid tests come with very good instructions on how to determine your water parameters (i.e. ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, pH, etc ...) You fill the test tube with water from your tank and add as many drops of the test solution as it says in the instructions. You then cap the test tube and shake it well. Some tests require waiting a few minutes before reading the tests results, and others don't. Once you're done, there is a white card with different colors on it. Every color indicates how much of the compound you're trying to measure is present in your water (ex. how much ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, etc ...) I hope that helps you.

I'd recommend Aquarium Pharmaceuticals MASTER Test Kit (which is a liquid test and which is VERY accurate and reliable).
 
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