How’s That Sound

Good overall plan?

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Chaz

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so I’m saving up for a tank and here’s what I’m planning on doing
It’s a 29 gallon freshwater tank. (30L 12W 18H) with Live plants and some sort of bigger rock structure. Filtered.

Fish
1 neon blue dwarf gourami
2 Cherry barbs
10 different assorted neon tetra ( the basic Neon tetra, Gold neon tetra, black neon tetra, glow light tetra, and blue tetra )

If you need the links here is the website that I’m looking at them at. Also seen them in person before.

LiveAquaria.com

I also want to get a couple shrimp and a snail or two! Let me know some good breeds to go in this tank snail and shrimp wise. Or if there would be a cool fish that would work well in the tank!
Also looking for plants!! I’m new to the live plants so any information or suggestions is helpful!
 

Katie13

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The Cherry Barbs need a school of at least 6, and so do the tetras. You listed many different species. Those “neon” are all different, not the same fish in different morphs. I would pick one (2 if you don’t get the cherry Barbs) and get 6-8 of them.
 

Crispii

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Cherry barbs do best in group of 6+.
 

Fahn

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1) keep 6+ of any small schooling fish; not only does this encourage them to be more active but also reduces stress and aggression
2) those are not different types of neon tetra, the blacks, glowlights, and blues are completely different species
3) in a 29 I would either get a school of the cherry barbs or a school of the neons. 2 small schools might be ok but one larger school would be ideal (8-12 individuals)
4) with the dwarf gourami shrimp will be at risk of being eaten, but you may be able to keep Neocarina such as Cherries or Blue Dreams, and ghost shrimp
5) most snails will be good for a tank that size, a bristlenose pleco would also be a great bottom feeder addition
6) stick to fast-growing, low-tech stem plants such as ludwigia, bacopa, rotala indica, and elodea; choose a nutrient rich substrate for best results
 

Momgoose56

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I agree with the above experts. Be sure to come back when you get your tank set up but before you put fish in it and the experts here can help you through the fishless cycling process. It takes 4 to 8 weeks but will ensure that all your new fish will be put in a tank that will be ready to support them and will keep them and your plants healthy and thriving.
Some important information you could check out while you're saving up:
Aquarium Nitrogen Cycle
 

Spulvert

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I'm only a beginner myself but plant wise I've been having fun with ludwigia,java moss, hornwort, and sword plants such as the Amazon sword and rose sword. Pretty easy to care for. Should you have an inert substrate such as sand or a gravel, I would recommend some root tabs such as flourish to ensure they get the nutrients they need. As for fish I think a gourami with a group of some kind of nano fish like tetra or rasbora's would look super clean. Good luck!
 

Islandvic

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Chaz , with your due diligence and getting info from the forum, you're on your way to having a great tank.

What are your plans for filtration? I recommend a minimum running 1 good HOB (hang-on-back) filter plus a sponge filter running off an air pump.

Having a sponge filter is a great backup to have. When needed, you can throw it in a 5 gallon bucket with an inexpensive heater and have an instantly cycled quarantine or hospital tank!

If the fish you mentioned, I have cherry barbs, black neon tetras, red eye tetras and neon tetras.

As for Live Aquaria, I have not bought live fish from there, but my buddy has and he was very happy with his fish order. He said he would buy from there again.

With regular neon tetras, my experience is that they can be hit or miss when it comes to their health and hardiness of their strain from the breeder.

It seems when I've bought them in the past, more than once at least 1 dies within 24hrs and another 1-2 die within a few days. I think it is from weak strains these fish farms churn out to maximize volume. They are small fish to begin with, so I also think they get easily stressed while being delivered to the local fish store and then again going to a new aquarium at home.

All my fish go into a separate fully cycled quarantine tank before going into the main tanks, so the Neons' deaths were not attributed to my water parameters in my opinion.

If you get neon tetras, my suggestion would to buy 20-30% more than you originally want, buy 12-13 of you want 10. That way if 1-2 dont make it, you're still good.

I love neon tetras, only giving my experience with them. Not at all trying to dissuade you from buying them.

I've had my cherry barbs, black neon tetras and red eye tetras for about 1 1/2 years now and they have been extremely hardy. The black neons and red eyes have bulked up nice. I've never had any of those die before.

May I suggest also looking at red serpae tetras. I have a dozen in my 75 gallon, and they also have been very hardy for over the year I've kept them. They have put on size, color up nice and look great. I've heard some people say they are fin-nippers, but I've never witnessed mine do this.

For your 29 gallon, consider 6 serpae tetras with a dozen neon tetras. That would be a nice combination of color for your tank.

I noticed you did not mention any bottom dwellers.

Consider some corydoras and/or kuhli loaches. I keep both also. The kuhli's (mine are java/black variety) are very entertaining to watch. When given enough cover and places to hide, they actually come out more during the day since they feel more comfortable. They have very small bio-load and they are social with each other.

If you consider keeping kuhli's, i would recommend getting at least 6-8 minimum.

What are your plans for substrate? Gravel or sand?
 
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