Hot water to clean nets and buckets from ICH?

amr22

Hi everyone,

I was just wondering if I rinse nets and buckets with hot water 50ºC/122ºF is that enough to kill ich?

Thanks in advance
 

Fisch

I do not believe that 50°C is hot enough, that temperature is barely 30% higher than your body temperature. What about soaking the articles in a bleach solution, and then rinse good with clean water and Prime dechlorinator?
 

RonP

I clean nets with a hydrogen peroxide
Soak..then just rinse.
Since it breaks down to form water
(H2o2 to h20) it is quickly harmless.
 

MacZ

50°C is hot enough. 30°C is enough to kill the live parasites during heat treatment. If you want to make sure use H2O2 or vinegar essence.

No need to reach for the bleach.
 

RayClem

50°C is hot enough. 30°C is enough to kill the live parasites during heat treatment. If you want to make sure use H2O2 or vinegar essence.

No need to reach for the bleach.

50 C (122 F) is approximately the temperature of hot water from many hot water heaters. Anything hotter than that is hot enough to scald human flesh. However, it won't do that if the contact is brief. Just sticking your net under running hot water for a few seconds might not be sufficient to get the job done. If you keep it at that temperature for a few minutes, it probably would be.
 

MacZ

If you keep it at that temperature for a few minutes, it probably would be.
I was not expecting the OP to just run it under the tap.
 

RayClem

I was not expecting the OP to just run it under the tap.
I figured that; but someone reading your post might think that would be sufficient. Thus, I decided to clarify. It takes a combination of time plus temperature to get the job done.

For example, the guidelines for cooking chicken typically say to cook until the internal temperature reaches 165 F (74 C) to insure that bacteria like salmonella are killed. However, when cooking sous vide, you can cook chicken breasts at a temperature of 140 F (60C) as long as you leave the chicken in the water bath for a minimum of 1 1/2 hours. If the chicken is frozen at the start, it will take a minimum of 2 hours. That will insure the pathogens are killed without every reaching the normally recommend temperature for other methods of cooking.
 

A201

If I'm not mistaken, Ich dies at 89 degrees.
 

Flyfisha

Does ich die with temperature or just stop breeding?
The strain we have in Australia just loves the warm tropical water in the northern part of tropical Australia and is not killed or slowed down by a nice warm bath.

As far as cleaning a net that has been used in an ich tank amr22 . My standard practice is simply to place the net outside for 30 days. That is the 100% guaranteed way of being sure.
 

SparkyJones

If I'm not mistaken, Ich dies at 89 degrees.
it's 15 degrees or more above or below the temperature of the water in a short period of time in which the infection case is detected. this drop or rise, that drastic, will end the infectious episode interrupting the life cycle and blocking reproduction. it would also kill the fish too though and if the fish moved to be protected from it, then it wouldn't get the ich either.

the whole 90-95- 80F thing is to kill tomites, but it won't kill any that are in protected stages.
they can only be killed as tomites, juvenile free swimmers, they are protected in the fish and encycted in the substrate.
playing with the temp, works for when they are vulnerable, you can crank up to 89-90, adults will drop off, and encyst, then in 24 hours reemerge as juveniles, so in theory you can raise to 90F to speed them up, they all drop off at once and you drop temp some, then raise it again when the juveniles reemerge and kill them before they attach to the fish again.

there's exceptions though, ich doesn't have to drop off fish to reproduce, it's been proven they can reproduce under the skin of the fish at times. also proven in florida that Ich can reproduce at 95F and remain a problem.

the fast 15 degree drop or rise in temp, seems to interrupt them. also successive treatments of raising the temp to drop off the adults from the fish, then removing the fish to another tank of same temp to then back it down slowly for the fish, and letting the infected tank run fishless for 55+ hours with nothing for the ich to attach to will kill them, some ich may go with the fish though, but then you do the same again in reverse. and drop off the adults, and move the fish again, reducing the population over and over until they are gone for good.

the nets, ich can't live longer than 55 hours without a host. and especially out of water in a dry environment for long at all, if the nets are allowed to dry out, the ich is a non issue.
 

MacZ

I'm out. Fahrenheit numbers confuse me. I got a half decent hang of gallons vs. liters and foot vs. meter, but with °F and inch my brain just taps out.
 

SparkyJones

I'm out. Fahrenheit numbers confuse me. I got a half decent hang of gallons vs. liters and foot vs. meter, but with °F and inch my brain just taps out.
Fahrenheit to Celsius , Subtract 32 from Fahrenheit to get Celsius, Add 32 to Celcius to get fahrenheit, this will get you in the ballpark.
1 inch equals roughly 25mm or 2.5cm. this also gets you in the ballpark. further off though if going to meters though.
it's what I use for conversions to keep it simple.

1 meter = 3.28 feet, it's similar to 1 yard for estimations.
1 kilo = 2.2 pounds.

Anywho. I use this stuff daily interchangeably. the only thing that grinds my gears is wires/cables, and converting AWG or "gauge" into mm2. I'm much more comfortable using mm2 then determining AWG.

Metric is the superior system of measurement. Celsius and Fahrenheit are a lot like daylight savings time and what time the sun comes up and goes down,
it depends on if you want freezing at 0 degrees or 32 degrees.
 

MacZ

Fahrenheit to Celsius , Subtract 32 from Fahrenheit to get Celsius, Add 32 to Celcius to get fahrenheit, this will get you in the ballpark.
1 inch equals roughly 25mm or 2.5cm. this also gets you in the ballpark. further off though if going to meters though.
it's what I use for conversions to keep it simple.

1 meter = 3.28 feet, it's similar to 1 yard for estimations.
1 kilo = 2.2 pounds.
Brain says: *bssssssss* :D

Anywho. I use this stuff daily interchangeably. the only thing that grinds my gears is wires/cables, and converting AWG or "gauge" into mm2. I'm much more comfortable using mm2 then determining AWG.
I have no idea what you're talking about.

it depends on if you want freezing at 0 degrees or 32 degrees.
I prefer to sweat my behind off at 32 degrees Celsius and my ice being at 0°C.
 

Fisch

Fahrenheit to Celsius , Subtract 32 from Fahrenheit to get Celsius, Add 32 to Celcius to get fahrenheit, this will get you in the ballpark.
1 inch equals roughly 25mm or 2.5cm. this also gets you in the ballpark. further off though if going to meters though.
it's what I use for conversions to keep it simple.

1 meter = 3.28 feet, it's similar to 1 yard for estimations.
1 kilo = 2.2 pounds.

Anywho. I use this stuff daily interchangeably. the only thing that grinds my gears is wires/cables, and converting AWG or "gauge" into mm2. I'm much more comfortable using mm2 then determining AWG.

Metric is the superior system of measurement. Celsius and Fahrenheit are a lot like daylight savings time and what time the sun comes up and goes down,
it depends on if you want freezing at 0 degrees or 32 degrees.
I believe the Fahrenheit to Celsius conversion is -32 and than roughly 1/2 (or 5/9).
90°F minus 32=58×1/2=27°C
Just don't want to confuse the crowd even more :)
 

SparkyJones

I believe the Fahrenheit to Celsius conversion is -32 and than roughly 1/2 (or 5/9).
90°F minus 32=58×1/2=27°C
Just don't want to confuse the crowd even more :)
Huh? I thought 90F = 32C no?

(90 F - 32) x .5556 = 32.22 C

I think converting Celsius to Fahrenheit it's actually...so like (30 C x 1.8) + 32 and then calculating the trajectory of the moon in it's waning phase, and factoring for the rotation of the earth minus a piece of pie....
way too complicated really to do conversions off the top of a persons head in either direction unless well practiced.

I dunno with F water freezes at 32F and boils at 212F
with C water freezes at 0C and boils at 100C

I'd think since most of the entire world uses C, including Britain not even using imperial measures much anymore, and it's a 0-100 scale for the two major points, freezing and boiling, it's probably the easier to understand of the two temp scales.

No idea why the u.s. still uses Imperial really except old habits die hard and maybe the tape measure lobby must have deep pockets or something. Hahahaha
Metric is so much better and I was raised Imperial.
 

RayClem

I know we have a groups of folks used to Fahrenheit and another used to Celsius (although it was known as centigrade back when I was young), Thus, I often reference both temperatures when I know folks on both sides of the divide.

When talking about water, Celsius wins as water freezes at 0 C and boils at 100 C at standard sea level pressure.

In dealing with the weather, Fahrenheit wins. Global temperatures generally fall between 0 F and 100 F. Temperatures below 0 F are uncommon, although they do occur in some areas closer to the poles. Temperatures below 0 C are so common you would have to report negative numbers every day during winter in some areas. When temperatures fall below 0 F, the chances of hypothermia and frostbite increase dramatically. Likewise, temperatures above 100 F are uncommon. When the temperature goes over 100 F, the chances of heat related illness such as heat exhaustion and sunstroke increase dramatically. That distinction is not nearly so obvious when you say the temperature exceeds 38 C.

Thus, depending on the situation, both systems of reporting are useful. To make matters worse, we then have the issue of Kelvin temperatures. We reference that system when we say we are using aquarium lighting at 6500K.
 

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