Higher light epiphyte plants?

shrimpyay

Probably a dumb question, but I did a search that didn't yield much in the way of results, so...

I'm working on a tank that will be low-tech, medium-low light, but will have part of the hardscape fully out of the water. I'd planned on growing plants both submerged and emersed on the hardscape, which will gradually rise from the floor of the tank to the surface. At the floor level of the tank I expect lighting to be pretty low, which is fine, and I'm planning around it, but it occurs to me that plants attached to the rock as it rises to the surface will get potentially much higher light. I had planned on that being primarily christmas moss, mini christmas moss, and anubias nana petite. But I'm now worried that the anubias will struggle with algae under the higher light at the top of the tank.

For reference, light is a Finnex Planted+ 24/7 which is to be placed on risers, and suspended approx 5 inches over the level of the tank. Water level will be an inch or 2 below the tank rim. The highest growing point will be completely above the water, so a few inches below the light. Tank is a 20gal long. Tank will be dosed with Thrive.

Is there a better option for a rhizome plant that could be secured to a hardscape, grow both emersed and submerged, and be exposed to higher light without succumbing to algae growth? Or will this not be as big of an issue as I'm worried about? Or is my plan just doomed to failure and I need to stick with moss only for the top of the tank?

Thanks!
 

Zachsnanotanks

Probably a dumb question, but I did a search that didn't yield much in the way of results, so...

I'm working on a tank that will be low-tech, medium-low light, but will have part of the hardscape fully out of the water. I'd planned on growing plants both submerged and emersed on the hardscape, which will gradually rise from the floor of the tank to the surface. At the floor level of the tank I expect lighting to be pretty low, which is fine, and I'm planning around it, but it occurs to me that plants attached to the rock as it rises to the surface will get potentially much higher light. I had planned on that being primarily christmas moss, mini christmas moss, and anubias nana petite. But I'm now worried that the anubias will struggle with algae under the higher light at the top of the tank.

For reference, light is a Finnex Planted+ 24/7 which is to be placed on risers, and suspended approx 5 inches over the level of the tank. Water level will be an inch or 2 below the tank rim. The highest growing point will be completely above the water, so a few inches below the light. Tank is a 20gal long. Tank will be dosed with Thrive.

Is there a better option for a rhizome plant that could be secured to a hardscape, grow both emersed and submerged, and be exposed to higher light without succumbing to algae growth? Or will this not be as big of an issue as I'm worried about? Or is my plan just doomed to failure and I need to stick with moss only for the top of the tank?

Thanks!

Bolbitis heudelotii this plant looks great and will definitely be a great option for you it typically better emersed but getting good submerged growth it typically wants higher light then others. And if you got stuff growing out you could mix in some rabbits foot fern it looks near identical but only grows emersed. If you're worried about algae just mix in some fast growing plants
 
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Berryblue

I have been thinking about this very question as well. While I haven't tried it yet, I believe that Hygrohila Pinnatifida is another option to consider. I hear that buces do well in high or low light too. I wish epiphytes grew faster to combat algae. Would love to see pics of your tank when you are ready.
 
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shrimpyay

Zachsnanotanks Berryblue

Oh wow you guys, thanks so much!!! I've looked into these plants just now and actually like them a lot. I don't think I even knew bolbitis heudelotii even exists, and definitely was unaware of rabbits foot fern. They both look awesome, and I'm happy to have some fully terrestrial plants. Would the rabbits foot fern tolerate having its feet wet constantly? The planting location will have a shallow stream of water running across the rhizome.

I definitely didn't realize Hygrophila pinnatifida was an epiphyte. I guess I assumed it was closer to water wisteria in growth habit! I'd looked over it briefly before and thought it has a lovely growth pattern, though. Good to hear buces can handle higher light, I was worried since most places seem to recommend them for low/medium. Completely agree about epiphytes and their growth. They're such awesome plants, and I love the option to grow them outside of substrate.

I'm actually documenting the build in a build thread! I'll definitely be sharing plenty pics once it's ready to plant.
 
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