High Water Temps Not Good For Fish?

andy305mia

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Hello, I have heard several people say that keeping fish at the higher or highest temperature tolerance is actually bad for the fish and takes away from lifespan. I could not find a lot on this topic on the interweb. Is there any hard evidence supporting this? I would think this is too hard to quantify, especially with ALL the other factors that need to be considered. Just curious what you all have to say. Thanks
 

Mary765

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I've heard that it does take away at their lifespan a little bit (have no evidence though) but on the other hand, the higher end of the temperature range will give fish a bit more energy if you're looking for a livelier tank, and can help fight certain diseases (like how warmth helps us get rid of colds) or so I've heard.

Swings and roundabouts at the end of the day
 

AquaticJ

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It depends what kind of fish, they’re all different. For example, a Blue Ram thrives at 84, but a Panda Cory would be extremely uncomfortable in that temperature. Its metabolism would speed up and it would not live as long.
 

DuaneV

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Exactly. It speeds their metabolism which makes them eat more which makes them more active which lowers their lifespan. All fish have an ideal temp but can live in higher/lower, but its not good for them. For example: Neons Tetras can live in water 70-78, but IDEAL is 75. Thats where theyll thrive, live longest, reproduce, etc. At higher and lower temps youll increase stress, chance of disease, overall health issues, shorten their lives, etc. Bettas love 80-82, German Blue Rams love 83-85, Guppies love 78, etc. As long as fish are CLOSE in ideal temp range, they can be kept together. But this is why its important to know what that is because a lot of people will put Bettas with Corys, and most Corys want it MUCH cooler than Bettas.
 
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andy305mia

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Ok thanks for all the responses, but who says that because they eat more and grow faster they live less. I would think that they would stop growing at some point regardless. I just don't see where it actually takes away from lifespan. If anything, I would think that if they are more active they are healthier. Disease at higher temps would explain something, but again where is the evidence? Sorry, I just don't get it, could be some old fishlore lol no pun intended
 
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andy305mia

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Lets say you have a fish that according to experts, 72-79 degrees is acceptable. Why would 79 be worse than 72? I mean its not a big deal, I just thought about it because I have seen people mention make that "higher temp" comment and still have not found any evidence to support it. I would think the difference would be negligible, like many of you mentioned, it would be ideal to keep your fish as happy and comfortable as possible which is usually in the higher temperature range from my own personal experience. Thanks
 

THRESHER

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Higher temps are good for fighting off sicknesses like ICK. All my fish thrive between 74/78.
 

Annie59

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I've often wondered this myself. So if it affects fish like that does it other animals as well?
Take for instance, people. Do people in Florida live a shorter life span than say someone in Alaska? lolol. I know it's silly but I think of odd things rotfl.
 

DuaneV

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Basic science, thats who says. lol Modern day aquariums started in the mid nineteenth century, and after 170ish years of keeping aquarium fish, we've got it to a pretty good exact science now. Its 100% science that says keeping fish on the high end of their temp range long term isnt good for them for all the reasons we've listed. There's TONS of science on the subject available. For a 1 inch fish who prefers 75 degress, keeping it at 79 is a HUGE difference and totally not negligible. We're not talking about humans who, through evolution, have evolved the ability to control their body temps to be comfortable at various temps, let alone all the high tech clothing we wear. We've talking about tiny, naked fish who cant self-regulate their heating and cooling. A quick google search will give you TONS of information regarding fish and their metabolic rates.
 
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andy305mia

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I have had fish at 74 degrees and then the same fish at 78 degrees and it was like night and day. Sickness broke out at 74 degrees, my fish were sluggish and I actually lost some fish. 78 degrees, 0 problems, healthy active fish. Mind you, both temps being within the suggested range. The articles are interesting, it talks about deviating from what I think is suggested temperature range equaling death. It did mention medium temps, interesting. I live in Miami lol I hope this doesn't apply to humans
 

DuaneV

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So youre questioning the science/reasoning, but saying youve seen it first hand? Im lost.
 
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andy305mia

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Higher temps are good for fighting off sicknesses like ICK. All my fish thrive between 74/78.
This is EXACTLY what im talking about. 74 and 78 no big deal right? WRONG lol, picky fish! I think DuaneV said it best. Thanks again. I'll aim for 76 and split the difference lol
 
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andy305mia

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So youre questioning the science/reasoning, but saying youve seen it first hand? Im lost.
Im just going off my very little experience not going to doubt 100 years lol. From my personal experience and my own eyes, when it comes to 74 to 78 degrees with my particular fish, i had much better results with higher temps
 
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