Help With Tank Cycling

yoshiii

Hi so I just started cycling my new betta tank since August 13th and had been adding nitrifying bacterias for 4 days straight now. I wonder how much longer i should wait for the cycle to complete. I also feed my tank regularly to provide the tank with ammonia. I want to know whether this “nitrifier” does any wonder or not. I wanted to buy the water test kit but it’s currently out of stock at my local pet store. If you could help me it would be wonderful. Thank youu
 

Ouse

Cycling usually takes between 4-6 weeks. A test kit would be really helpful to know where you’re at in the cycle and when it’s done.

Instead of adding nitrifying bacteria, you need to be adding an ammonia source. Without a constant ammonia source (fish are the source in cycled tanks or fish-in cycles), all of the nitrifying bacteria will quickly die off.
 

yoshiii

oh yess i forgot to mention i regularly feed my tank to provide ammonia. Thanks for your reply!
 

Ouse

You’re welcome.

Adding nitrifying bacteria from bottles is money down the drain IMO. The nitrifying bacteria will find it’s way into the tank by itself and will grow proportionate to the production of ammonia/nitrite; no need to buy bottles of the stuff. :)
 

Azedenkae

Hi so I just started cycling my new betta tank since August 13th and had been adding nitrifying bacterias for 4 days straight now. I wonder how much longer i should wait for the cycle to complete. I also feed my tank regularly to provide the tank with ammonia. I want to know whether this “nitrifier” does any wonder or not. I wanted to buy the water test kit but it’s currently out of stock at my local pet store. If you could help me it would be wonderful. Thank youu
Cycling is to establish enough nitrifiers to handle the bioload of a fully stocked tank (at least that's what I think should be the definition). That translates to the capacity for the tank to handle roughly 2ppm ammonia a day. So the only way to be absolutely certain a tank is cycled is to test that capacity, i.e. dose 2ppm ammonia and if both ammonia and nitrite is zero, one is cycled.

With that said, you are cycling with fish food, so the process is rather different. Eventually what you want to see is if you ghostfeed as if the tank is fully stocked, and ammonia and nitrite persistently remains at zero (or 0.25ppm ammonia with test kits like API), your tank has a decent chance of being cycled.

Either way you'd need to measure ammonia and nitrite, preferably also nitrate.
 

Dunk2

Hi so I just started cycling my new betta tank since August 13th and had been adding nitrifying bacterias for 4 days straight now. I wonder how much longer i should wait for the cycle to complete. I also feed my tank regularly to provide the tank with ammonia. I want to know whether this “nitrifier” does any wonder or not. I wanted to buy the water test kit but it’s currently out of stock at my local pet store. If you could help me it would be wonderful. Thank youu

Fully cycling a tank usually takes between 4 - 6 weeks. In your case, it’s only been about a week.

Whether or not bottled bacteria speeds up the cycling process is the subject of much debate and mixed results. Be patient and give your tank time to properly cycle.
 

jdhef

Welcome to FishLore!

I just want to say that I am not at all opposed to doing a fish in cycle with a betta. Betta's are usually kept in those little cups, which are not cycled and who knows how often the water gets changed in those cups.

So in my opinion, a betta actually has a better life if it goes into an uncycled tank, provided you test the water daily and if ammonia+nitrite is less than 1ppm you add enough SeaChem Prime to treat the entire tank daily, or if ammonia+nitrite gets above 1ppm you perform a 50% water change with enough Prime to treat the entire tank volume.

But actually if it were me, I would drain the tank and refill. Wait a minimum of 24 hours then add your betta and a bottle of Tetra SafeStart+. Then do nothing for 14 days but feed your fish. On day 14 test and if all worked as it should, congrats... you've got yourself a cycled tank.

Best of luck!
 

mattgirl

Welcome to Fishlore :)

As other have said, cycling a tank normally takes 4 to 6 weeks. Some types of bottled bacteria seem to help but without being able to test you can't know whether or not the tank is cycled. Also by using fish food as your ammonia source you can't know how much ammonia is being produced.

Thankfully it isn't going to take a great deal of it since this tank will one day house a single fish. When using fish food as the ammonia source I recommend you use finely ground flakes. For the first week I would add a pinch of food daily. After that feed every third day. This should keep a constant supply of ammonia in the tank. Without testing though we still can't know how much ammonia is being produced or know when the cycle is complete.

or follow jdhef 's good advice if you can get Tetra Safe Start plus. As long as the instructions are followed just as written folks have had success in cycling their tank sooner than 4 to 6 weeks. Without being able to test you still won't know if the tank successfully cycled.

As he also pointed out. As long as you don't over feed and you change out half the water in the tank each and every week it may not matter if the tank never actually completes its cycle.

BTW: What size tank are we talking about?
 

Dunk2

There are a fair number of folks, including jdhef , who have had success using Tetra Safe Start Plus. Probably due to my own mistake(s) using it, I’m not one of them.

Given my experience, I would not “do nothing” for the 14 days after dosing Safe Start. Given a number of variables that might impact the effectiveness of Safe Start, I would test ammonia levels daily as you would do with any tank that isn’t fully cycled.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
64
Views
742
breadsheeran
Replies
3
Views
378
KinsKicks
Replies
13
Views
265
AngelsAndDemons
Replies
4
Views
3K
jwjmcd
  • Question
Replies
8
Views
154
imyourhuckleberry

Random Great Thread!

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom