Help! Water changing bad smell! Water quality conflict?

kittykatguppybettalover

So I was doing my usual water changes with my five gallon bucket... however... I added all the chemicals to the bucket before the water and this awful smell happened. ROTTEN EGGS. The chemicals I used were seachem prime, API PH DOWN, API STRESS COAT, and API STRESS ZYME. Any ideas if it was a chemical reaction? If I should still use the water? Or if I should just toss it it's for baby fry so I want to be extremely careful. Btw it dosnt smell after I added the water the smell went away. HELP!
 

flyinGourami

Seachem prime conditioner will have that smell, its normal.
 
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kittykatguppybettalover

Seachem prime conditioner will have that smell, its normal.
So the water is safe to use then?
 
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flyinGourami

So the water is safe to use then?
Yes. Smell your bottle of prime lol, you will see what I mean. If it has a strong sulfur smell then there shouldn't be an issue.
 
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kittykatguppybettalover

Yes. Smell your bottle of prime lol, you will see what I mean. If it has a strong sulfur smell then there shouldn't be an issue.
I do see what you mean I think mixing it with the warm water or other chemicals made the smell extremely strong and noticeable thank you I can't believe I never noticed.
 
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flyinGourami

I do see what you mean I think mixing it with the warm water or other chemicals made the smell extremely strong and noticeable thank you I can't believe I never noticed.
No problem . Lol I got worried at first too when I smelled prime.
 
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EbiAqua

May I ask why you're using 3 separate water conditioners?
 
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mattgirl

So I was doing my usual water changes with my five gallon bucket... however... I added all the chemicals to the bucket before the water and this awful smell happened. ROTTEN EGGS. The chemicals I used were seachem prime, API PH DOWN, API STRESS COAT, and API STRESS ZYME. Any ideas if it was a chemical reaction? If I should still use the water? Or if I should just toss it it's for baby fry so I want to be extremely careful. Btw it dosnt smell after I added the water the smell went away. HELP!
I have to ask why you are adding all these things to the water. Prime and stress coat are both water conditioners so no need to add both. Do you have a specific reason for adding PH down? Normally it is better to just deal with the PH of the source water instead of chasing a specific number. If this tank is cycled there is no reason to be adding stress zyme since it is a bottled bacteria.

But to answer your question. Prime does smell like rotten eggs but the smell should dissipate as soon as it is stirred into the water.
 
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kittykatguppybettalover

May I ask why you're using 3 separate water conditioners?
It seems to be working for me I like the added benefits. Is it really a bad thing?

I have to ask why you are adding all these things to the water. Prime and stress coat are both water conditioners so no need to add both. Do you have a specific reason for adding PH down? Normally it is better to just deal with the PH of the source water instead of chasing a specific number. If this tank is cycled there is no reason to be adding stress zyme since it is a bottled bacteria.

But to answer your question. Prime does smell like rotten eggs but the smell should dissipate as soon as it is stirred into the water.
This is a temporary fry tank and it is not cycled. Unfortunately. Prime to help with ammonia, stress coat to help with netting and handling, plus my PH is way too high in the water I'm using so I tone it down with adjusters. Dose that seem like too much?
 
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Noroomforshoe

Ph cemicals can often lead to a changing ph . Many/most tank bread fish can adapt to whatever ph that you have. And it is best to avoid the more sensitive species that may not adapt to your ph. No fish can tolerate a shifting ph for long.

I think that it is best to add as few chemicals as possible.
I am not trying to tell you what to do, but a cycled tank doesnt need the bacterial from stress zyme, or 3 different dechlorination. I would use the prime only.
 
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Gone

I'll add my two cents, and it's worth every penny.

I think there's a tendency to reach for additives in an effort to maintain the best quality water. Personally, I don't think anything comes close to frequent water changes. Certainly, you need something to detoxify ammonia and heavy metals with conditioner for water changes, but if you added everything the manufacturers tell you to add, you end up with a bunch of chemicals in your tank fighting against each other. Other than deworming with levamisole every six months or so, I haven't put any additives in my tanks in over two years other than Prime.

And yes, the sulfur smell is normal for Prime. I think the pronounced smell could be because of so many different chemicals being added.

I agree with the other posts that chasing pH should be avoided if at all possible.
 
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kittykatguppybettalover

Ph cemicals can often lead to a changing ph . Many/most tank bread fish can adapt to whatever ph that you have. And it is best to avoid the more sensitive species that may not adapt to your ph. No fish can tolerate a shifting ph for long.

I think that it is best to add as few chemicals as possible.
I am not trying to tell you what to do, but a cycled tank doesnt need the bacterial from stress zyme, or 3 different dechlorination. I would use the prime only.
Alright you have convinced me I'ma gradually get them off of the PH adjuster. However this tank is not cycled soooo yeah I'ma keep that up. But not for my cycled tanks. Thanks for the input.
 
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Noroomforshoe

If you have tanks that are cycled, all you have to do is take filter media from the cycled tank and add it to the new tank and with enough cycled material, you can instant cycle your new tank.
 
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Islandvic

kittykatguppybettalover , what is your pH, you said it "was way too high".



 
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Gone

If you have tanks that are cycled, all you have to do is take filter media from the cycled tank and add it to the new tank and with enough cycled material, you can instant cycle your new tank.

I agree with the principle, but it's not that easy. I've seen lots of people take filter media from an established tank and thinking it will instantly cycle their new tank, but it seldom works like that.

It all depends on the bioload of the tank you're taking the media from and the bioload of the new tank. You need a relatively massive amount of filter media transferred to the new tank to achieve an "instant cycle." For one, if you remove a large portion of the filter media from the existing tank, you're going to kill all the fish in the donor tank because you just obliterated the bacteria colony. It will no longer handle the bioload.

It's true that most of the bacteria is in the filter media, but there is still a significant amount on the sides, substrate, decorations, etc. That's why overcleaning a tank will result in a mini cycle, while the bacteria colony fights to catch up.

If you have a 100G tank and transfer 1/4 of the filter media to a new 20G tank, the remaining media will probably hold the bioload of the old tank, and will probably give a really good start to the 20G. But if you're talking about taking media from a 20G to "instant cycle" a 10G, that's not going to work. It will provide seed bacteria, but that takes the instant out of it.

Never assume your new tank is instantly cycled. You need to test every day and do water changes to keep toxins at 1 ppm or below. If the transferred filter media is not enough for a complete cycle, you'll know it from the test readings. If it does handle the new bioload, you'll know it from the test readings. Don't guess. Test.
 
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Noroomforshoe

Ok, I will put it another way, -
It is possible to take used filter media from established tanks and use them in new aquariums to start a cycle, or possibly even instant cycle a tank. NEVER remove more than half of the media from an established tank! Never assume that the new tank is cycled until you have done several water tests.
I have 2 bioweel hang on the back filters running in my 55 gallon, there are 4 filter cartridges, and 2 sponges that sit in the back of the filters and there are also the 2 biwheels. I have used filter media, to instant cycle about 5 tanks in the past, about 10 times. but if you dont have all the extra filter media that i have, you may not be as succuessfull. Water test are very important!
 
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