Help! shrimp mysteriously dying

tjander

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Could you be over feeding? Causing an ammonia spike?
 

Sputnik

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Do you feed your shrimp using a glass dish? I find that helps temendously with pollution from uneaten food. They poo in there too, so when I lift out the dishbevery night its like a minI gravel vac!
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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Sputnik said:
Do you feed your shrimp using a glass dish? I find that helps temendously with pollution from uneaten food. They poo in there too, so when I lift out the dishbevery night its like a minI gravel vac!
I use the glass dish that's in the photo though the food doesn't alwsys land inside

two dead today!

I ordered a phosphate test kit out of desperation to find a problem and that arrived today and says no phosphates
 

FantasyFanVII

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You could try feeding a small meal every day or every other day. Try using a turkey baster to get it in the dish, assuming it's a sinking food. If they leave a ton of food after every meal, feed less/less often. You should also notice an ammonia spike if you do feed too much, so watch out for it.
 

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One thing I do that helps me is to fill the dish with tank water, put the food in and let it soak until it sinks, then very, very carefully place it in the tank. I also use a dish with a higher ( one inch tall) rI'm to prevent spillage. I hardly ever get any, but pipet up any on the rare occasion something falls out. I remove the dish when I come home from work so leftovers don’t sit. I feed small amounts daily for my shrimp-only tank but much less frequently for tanks with fish (mainly mineral supplements). This practice made a real difference in my shrimp-only tank. Much less debris in my substrate.
 

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Did you ever get a second opinion on your water from the lfs?
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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My lfs isn't so local and they're kinda hopeless. I didn't feed last night and I still had a death this morning

Maybe shrimp just aren't right for me. Or maybe I should Tear it down and start again?
 

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Don’t give up! Clearly you have done a lot of research and are doing your best to give them all that they need! And, if you tear it down and start over with the same tank, you may not eliminate the problem, since the issue has not been identifieddefinitively. Where did you buy your shrimp? If it was online ( or sometimes even if it wasn’t) you can ask the seller for advice. Maybe try Flip aquatics? In some areas cooperative extensions may also be willing to help.
 

tjander

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Abby, look it sometimes takes awhile to get it dialed in. Took me a few goes myself. That said. If you scrap it and start again. Do the research and set it up right. It is very tough to fix things compared to doing it right the first time.

So let me say this, and it’s a bit cold but I don’t mean it that way... but if you can’t afford to do it right then don’t. Shrimps are not as easy as everyone makes it out. There is some special items needed and they cost money. More do then a hand full of guppies in a fish bowl. I am not being. Disparaging or anything but I also think that reality has to fall into play here. I hope you understand my point.
 

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Agree with tjander that it is not easy and often takes a few tries, but hobbyists learn by doing. I have certainly had my share of issues with both neos and carididina species and approached problems by either finding the underlying cause or if that is impossible, treating empirically, since that will give me useful information going forward. I keep a “lab notebook” of water test results, maintenance. deaths, tank additions etc. In one instance, I had sporadic deaths and was at a loss as to the cause. Water parameters were good, but I noted the substrate was breaking down. I moved the shrimp to a different tank with a different substrate type (easier to clean) but I did not start over with new stock. I tried instead to solve what I thought was the problem and I think this improved my shrimpkeeping. Luckily, it worked for me that time and I learned something about aquarium maintenance that I would not have necessarily understood if I started completely over with new stock. So, I don’t recommend starting over unless you have a detailed plan moving forward. And if you do decide to do it, I would use a brand new setup, start with easy, low grade neos and document water parameters and observations. I still am hoping you will find some answers to this puzzling issue though. I suspect we have all been where you are- I know I have! Good luck!
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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tjander said:
Abby, look it sometimes takes awhile to get it dialed in. Took me a few goes myself. That said. If you scrap it and start again. Do the research and set it up right. It is very tough to fix things compared to doing it right the first time.

So let me say this, and it’s a bit cold but I don’t mean it that way... but if you can’t afford to do it right then don’t. Shrimps are not as easy as everyone makes it out. There is some special items needed and they cost money. More do then a hand full of guppies in a fish bowl. I am not being. Disparaging or anything but I also think that reality has to fall into play here. I hope you understand my point.
I'm actually really greatful for your help and for putting it bluntly. I'm ok with spending the money. Especially since I've already spend hundreds of dollars on this I was just hoping I wouldn't have to. I was really hoping I could identify the problem

I got them from a local seller who just have stop many in his home tank. In addition to getting an RO system and I've already ordered salty shrimp GH/hk+, are there any more changes I should be making?
Edit:
So correct me if I'm wrong but I should let the shrimp do their thing and make any changes you guys recommend and if they all die, I should get some mts and try to get them breeding and going. Once they are healthy and reproducing I can reintroduce the RCS (potentially from a different seller) and if I still don't get the right results what would I change?
 

tjander

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Why do you want mts? Sorry I am just not a fan of snails but that just me. I would sit back and relax don’t add anything to your tank just keep up with the water changes at 15-20% weekly and see what you get.

To tell you a true story my shrimp tank took off after going on a three week vacation and the only interaction the tank had was a daily feeding via an automatic feeder. I think the lesson here is sometimes things work themselves out and when we try to do to much we make it worse.

Now, If you start over, setup the tank. Get it cycled the best way you like. Let it sit for 3-4 month doing what you need to do to keep the cycle going then slowly add a group of shrimp. Use available info on what your water conditions need to be for shrimp and have at it.
Let me say this. If you can obtain good stable water with out adding other things to it your way better off. It’s so much simpler to be able to just add water then mixing compounds. Yes you have more control when you mix but it’s a hassle to do.

Understand this is my opinion based on what you have said. I am happy to help out to the best I can but understand it’s only based on what I know the ultimate decision is your to make.
 

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Agree with tjander- just test often to learn your water’s normals and fluctuations- with very rare exceptions- I test all my tanks weekly. If you see sick shrimp or die offs- do additional testing right away- you may be lucky enough to catch an ammonia spike or pH shift. And clean your tank, but not overmuch. I am zealous about substrate but leave algae on the sides and back for shrimp to graze. And I only clean my sponge filters when they really look like they need it , and then only in tank water. I’d skip the snails and instead consider reducing feeding ( especially if the tank is mature -i.e. over six months old- and has algae). Snails would just be a new variable introduced into your tank And would make it harder for you to isolate the problem. I’d be focusing on substrate maintenance instead. Also, have you contacted the person you bought the shrimp from? If they are selling extras, they must have good husbandry methods and I’d try to emulate those as much as possible.
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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The seller speaks really poor English but I gathered that he doesn't treat his water at all or test it as he doesn't have a kit. I wanted mts to stir up the substrate to avoid air pockets because I already have some small ones. Plus once I can keep the snails alive I can be more confident about adding shrimp. They would be like test subjects
 

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Malaysian trumpet snails aerate substrate, but they also poop( adding to your bioload), multiply, and once you have them in a tank, they are almost imposible to get rid of. Aerating the substrate using proper maintenance is better in my opinion. It prevents pockets from forming in the first place.
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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Sputnik said:
Malaysian trumpet snails aerate substrate, but they also poop( adding to your bioload), multiply, and once you have them in a tank, they are almost imposible to get rid of. Aerating the substrate using proper maintenance is better in my opinion. It prevents pockets from forming in the first place.
Sounds like a triple bonus to me
1. Them pooping could help keep the cycle.
2. I actually quite like them
3. I haven't been able to keep them alive in this tank as of yet so if I can see that they're surviving it could mean I've overcome whatever is going wrong
4. They have no adverse affects on the shrimp.
5. They can aerate the substrate without uprooting the Monte Carlo

So that's actually more than three.
If they will have any adverse affects on the tank other than pooping please let me know though coz I don't want to make it worse
 

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Are you saying you have introduced MTS into that tank before and they haven't survived? That’s troubling since they are bomb proof. There must be something seriously wrong in your tank. Have you ever put in copper or tested your water for copper? Have you ever treated with levamisole or fenbendazole? Shrimp are delicate but MTS could survive the apocalypse.
 
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abbytherookiehuman

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I know which is the most worrying to me. I've tested for copper a dozen times and every time there were no traces of copper. Long after the snails were gone I treated "no planaria" but that shouldn't affect the shrimp. I had mts in a separate tank until a few weeks ago and now I think they're all gone too.
 

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