Help plz! I need a new filter

Lady Indiana

I’ve had fish for over 25yrs but I need advice please!

I recently downsized from a 55gal to a 35gal. My current internal filter is creating too strong of a current and I need to replace it with possibly another internal or canister. I can’t stand the waterfall fall ones (splashes & noisy).

what are your recommendations??

background:
freshwater
Current filter is 6yo internal
Not planted
fish: 4 angels, 2 gouramis, 4 tetras, 2 kuhli loaches, 3 cories & 2 algae eaters
Filter only uses ceramic rings
Stand only has 6” clearance for a canister filter

i have battled nitrate levels for decades!! When I transferred everyone into their new home (mix of old, distilled & tap h2o) the nitrates were perfect... finally. Now 2wks later they’re super high again. I need a GOOD filter and advice for keeping nitrates manageable. Literally everything else is perfect (sometimes ph drops). Changing water every week is not realistic.

also, is too possible to have too much air? I’m using 2 8” air stone bubble bars

thank you!
 

HupGupp

What kind of plants do you have? A fast growing stem feeder plant would help a lot.
 

KingOscar

No filter will reduce nitrates, only water changes or plants can do that. On top of this you have a high bio load of fish that will produce a lot of nitrates. If you don't want to do weekly water changes then you need less fish or a larger tank!
 

HupGupp

"not planted" - I guess it's stricter water changes or get planted. A filter can't fix this.
 

CMT

Respectfully, you are very overstocked for a 35G tank (unless your angels are young juveniles, in which case you will be soon). A better filter is not going to reduce nitrates. One of the filters primary purposes is to produce nitrates (from the ammonia from all of your fish).

The way to reduce nitrates is frequent water changes or lower stock. Live plants can also help to a certain degree.

You will need very frequent water changes to manage nitrates with that stocking in a 35G. If you want less nitrates with infrequent water changes you need significantly less fish in that tank.
 

Chewbroccoli

I won't add anything on the stock levels or water quality issues you have that has not already been said.

In terms of internal vs canister I will always go with Canister as it gives you volume back into the tank as the canister is basically a bucket of water. Canisters hold more filtration media. It comes down to cost and what you can afford. I have owned to Eheim filters and both did an excellent job. But after years of not having fish and returning to the hobby I grabbed a Aqua One cheapy filter and it's doing a good enough job as well but the cost between the two is vast.
 

Lady Indiana

What kind of plants do you have? A fast growing stem feeder plant would help a lot.
Right now I have an English Ivy with the roots in the aquarium water. But everything else is plastic plants. I can’t keep real plants. They either get eaten or turn yellow and decompose slowly dirtying up the water for months.
No filter will reduce nitrates, only water changes or plants can do that. On top of this you have a high bio load of fish that will produce a lot of nitrates. If you don't want to do weekly water changes then you need less fish or a larger tank!
Yeah, I knew I’d be pushing it downsizing but even in the 55 the nitrates were always high.

right now I have an English Ivy with the roots in the tank but no live aquatic plants
I won't add anything on the stock levels or water quality issues you have that has not already been said.

In terms of internal vs canister I will always go with Canister as it gives you volume back into the tank as the canister is basically a bucket of water. Canisters hold more filtration media. It comes down to cost and what you can afford. I have owned to Eheim filters and both did an excellent job. But after years of not having fish and returning to the hobby I grabbed a Aqua One cheapy filter and it's doing a good enough job as well but the cost between the two is vast.
Is the current less with the canister? The internal one I have now says I can adjust the flow... but not really
 

HupGupp

Right now I have an English Ivy with the roots in the aquarium water. But everything else is plastic plants. I can’t keep real plants. They either get eaten or turn yellow and decompose slowly dirtying up the water for months.
There are some plants I'd think anyone can keep without doing much more than stick them in your substrate and just let them go. For myself I use a lot of valesenari in my tanks in a gravel substrate. All you need to do is thin it out periodically.
 

Chewbroccoli

Right now I have an English Ivy with the roots in the aquarium water. But everything else is plastic plants. I can’t keep real plants. They either get eaten or turn yellow and decompose slowly dirtying up the water for months.

Yeah, I knew I’d be pushing it downsizing but even in the 55 the nitrates were always high.

right now I have an English Ivy with the roots in the tank but no live aquatic plants

Is the current less with the canister? The internal one I have now says I can adjust the flow... but not really
You can get a spray bar and position this to point towards the top of the water to create surface tension. This works for my tank and the fish just sit under it. You can position it however you see fit really.
I attacked my for reference
 

Attachments

  • 20220523_152005.jpg
    20220523_152005.jpg
    119.1 KB · Views: 12
  • 20220523_151955.jpg
    20220523_151955.jpg
    126.5 KB · Views: 12

FishDin

Have you tried floating or emergent plants? They will generally take up more nitrates as they have unrestricted access to atmospheric CO2. You need a lot. Not one or two plants.

There is no room for a canister filter in your cabinet, so you can put it outside the cabinet. Also, you can control the outflow on a canister filter, so you can turn it down if it's too strong (up to a point. My Fluval can be turned down to about 50%

I would start by rehoming the angel fish as they need a much bigger tank. I would then get some water lettuce or similar floating plants to help with removing nitrates. Water sprite can be floated and not planted in substrate.

IMO, if a 50% weekly water change is not enough to control the nitrates, you need to reduce the source of the nitrates (remove some of the fish). You mention that the nitrates were high after only 2 weeks, so I assume you are not doing weekly water changes. 50% once a week is pretty standard, especially for an overstocked tank. What level of nitrates are you seeing?
 

Lady Indiana

You can get a spray bar and position this to point towards the top of the water to create surface tension. This works for my tank and the fish just sit under it. You can position it however you see fit really.
I attacked my for reference
I like that!! What type of filter do you have?
 

Chewbroccoli

I like that!! What type of filter do you have?
It's just a bog standard Aqua One 800. It's a pretty cheap filter for its capacity compared to other major brands.
 

YouBettaBelieveIt

My best recommendation is plants, plants, plants! The help break down the nitrates and they’re really pretty. Do some research based on your lighting and substrates, there are some really easy/hardy options. Don’t forget aquarium plant food too.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
5
Views
518
RayClem
Replies
4
Views
270
Ghelfaire
Replies
8
Views
631
richiep
Replies
5
Views
291
SnookusFish
Replies
4
Views
281
Assassin1234

New Aquarium Filter Threads

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom