Help Needed With New Glofish Tank

mmaer

Member
I purchased a small 10-gallon Glofish tank for my daughter and admittedly did not do the proper research before acclimating and putting 6 Glofish Tetras into the tank. We lost four within a few hours and another the next day. We're on day three now, and the lone survivor seems to be acting healthy, even though I know there is most likely a high level of stress. I did some reading and realized that I should have done more research regarding tank cycling and acclimation. My main goal now is to save the remaining fish and get the tank cycled. I'm looking for some assistance to get me through this process as there is so much conflicting information out there. The temperature of the tank is around 79-80 degrees, and I've posted a photo of the water test results from last night. Products I currently have on hand include Seachem Prime, Stability, and Neutral Regulator. I'd appreciate it if someone would be kind enough to walk me through the process that will lead to the highest likelihood of the fish surviving. Thank you!

IMG_0983.JPG
 

LagerthaM

Member
All of your ratings are really high from what I can tell, so I would recommend water changes, maybe 25% daily (someone correct me if I am wrong). Do you have a filter in your tank?
 

LagerthaM

Member
mmaer said:
Yes, I'm using an Aqueon QuietFlow Aquarium Power Filter 10.
Perfect, just try doing some water changes (make sure to use dechlorinator) and see if that helps. Since you didn't cycle that's why your numbers are all over the place, hopefully water changes can bring them to a more normal rate.
 
  • Thread Starter

mmaer

Member
Aside from the water changes, do I need to be bothering with the Seachem Stability or the Neutral Regulator?
 

Vaughn

Member
mmaer said:
Aside from the water changes, do I need to be bothering with the Seachem Stability or the Neutral Regulator?
Keep adding stability daily since that is the bacteria you’re trying to colonize. I’d say keep using the regulator so you don’t have a ph swing as those are stressful and could kill the fish. How is the little guy holding up?
 

qldmick

Member
I don't know what you guys are looking at but all parameters except for ph are 0 or close to it, just as you would expect in a brand new tank. no water changes need just now.
 

bizaliz3

Member
Your tank is just a few days old, so you have barely begun your cycle. So all the levels are actually very low. But that won't last long!!

During your cycle, the fish are going to have to live through an ammonia spike and nitrite spike both of which are toxic to fish. Once the cycle is complete, you will have zero ammonia, zero nitrites and a low reading of nitrates. (you will want to keep those under 20-40ppm. anything higher can become toxic as well).

Your pH is not a concern. I wouldn't even waste your time testing it. A stable PH is much better than trying to achieve any specific PH.

Your cycle may take a few weeks or more to complete. So you will want to keep a very very close eye on the levels. I would test daily during the cycling process. If the ammonia and nitrites stay under 1.0ppm, then your seachem prime will protect the fish if you add it to the tank every 24-48 hours (for full tank volume) So at the very least, you will want to keep those levels low.

If it were me, I would do a 25% water change every 1-2 days using prime until the cycle is complete. The daily water changes could make the cycle take longer, but it will give the fish a better chance of survival!
 
  • Thread Starter

mmaer

Member
Thanks everyone. Unfortunately I came home today to find that the last fish did not survive. I'm going to take some time to correct things and do this right. I've read a lot on fish-less cycling which seems to be the best method. Now that I have that ability, can someone either suggest the best article on it, or talk to a me a bit about that process? Again there seems to be a lot of different ideas on the topic.
 

Noroomforshoe

Member
Keep the tank set up, keep the filter running, you don't even need to rush to remove that dead fish, as it will help cycle the tank.

Before I say any more, The glow tetra really need a 20 gallon tank, trying to keep them in a 10 is going to lead to more loss and you are going to start hating fish keeping.

If you can get a larger tank, add the filter from the other tank and run both filters.

I have one article about cyling from this sight you might want to look at.
https://www.fishlore.com/NitrogenCycle.htm
 

Hugginz

Member
mmaer said:
I purchased a small 10-gallon Glofish tank for my daughter and admittedly did not do the proper research before acclimating and putting 6 Glofish Tetras into the tank. We lost four within a few hours and another the next day. We're on day three now, and the lone survivor seems to be acting healthy, even though I know there is most likely a high level of stress. I did some reading and realized that I should have done more research regarding tank cycling and acclimation. My main goal now is to save the remaining fish and get the tank cycled. I'm looking for some assistance to get me through this process as there is so much conflicting information out there. The temperature of the tank is around 79-80 degrees, and I've posted a photo of the water test results from last night. Products I currently have on hand include Seachem Prime, Stability, and Neutral Regulator. I'd appreciate it if someone would be kind enough to walk me through the process that will lead to the highest likelihood of the fish surviving. Thank you!

IMG_0983.JPG
Get a pleco. It worked for me. I kept him in there for a month by himself. I know at the beginning he suffered somewhat but he survived. I’m not saying to let him suffer on purpose, but it’s a very hardy fish that can help you learn before adding more. And only add a couple at the time after you’ve cycled!
 

Random Great Thread

Know of a great thread on Fishlore that should be on this list? Submit the thread link here:
Great threads on Fishlore

Latest threads

Top Bottom