Help! My snails are sick.

  1. amber_lea84 Initiate Member

    So there's something wrong with my planted five gallon tank environment and I don't know what it is.

    I used to have nerite snails, and eventually they all died. I started with five. Two died, then about six months later the other three died. I had them for about two years so I figured maybe it was old age. It crossed my mind that it could have been the tank, but I didn't know what it could be so I didn't worry about it too much.

    I have a planted tank with one fish, and I waited a few months, and the algae started getting out of control so I decided to get more snails.

    I did a 50% water change (using Prime) and then went to the pet store and bought five more nerite snails.

    The temp range is good (76 degrees), the ph is testing at 6.0, and the ammonia and nirate are testing at 0.

    I'm thinking about doing another water change to see if that helps, but I'm worried it would do more harm than good.

    Does anyone have any suggestions? They're all curled up on their backs playing dead. They've been like that for a day and a half. I took one out and poked at him and he perked up, and then immediately curled back up when I put him in the tank again. I've never had any problems with snails before so I don't know what it could be.

    Is it maybe the ph? What could I do about that?

    They were all so happy and perky at the pet store. I feel like a snail murder.

    edit: when I test my tap water's ph, it's 7.6.

    second edit: I did a 20% water change and it brought the ph up to 6.4, and my snails aren't moving around, but they started to come out of their shells a little. So, I think all signs point to a ph problem. But I don't know how after doing a 50% water change three days ago the ph could have been at 6 if my tap water is 7.6. The Prime website says Prime doesn't effect ph and when I tested the water with prime in it before adding it to my tank it was at 7.6.
     
  2. kinezumi89 Fishlore VIP Member

    Snails need a higher pH, otherwise their shells will deteriorate. Rather than use chemicals to alter your pH, you can try adding crushed seashells or eggshells into the filter housing (you can make a little pouch out of pantyhose to keep things tidy). It would be hard to determine why the pH in your tank is lower than that of your tap without knowing what all is in your tank. I think some types of soils can alter it, and driftwood can cause it to drop, as well.
     

  3. Echostatic Well Known Member Member

    Low calcium carbonate (KH) levels can cause an unstable PH. I find it helpful to have a liquid KH test kit available, especially when keeping snails. I recommend getting one if you don't have one and seeing where your KH is at.
     

  4. dtana117 Initiate Member

    I have a limestone rock in my tank to keep the PH higher(right about 8). It has never fluctuated more than .1 higher or lower in the 5 years it has been running. With all the local quarries they are easy to come by around here. Plus all the fossilized micro organisms make the rock look awesome.