HELP Gouramis, will they fight?

DoubleDutch

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Answer : rehome one male.
 

PascalKrypt

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Momgoose56 said:
Okay, -in this OP's case, would removing all the females decrease the male aggression toward each other? It works with Cichlids...
Momgoose56 said:
I'm talking about this OP. Could removing all his females decrease aggression between his male blue and golden Gourami? PascalKrypt?
As was pointed out, it doesn't apply to this case.
But to answer your question: maybe. Some individual gourami are simply so savage that the presence of breeding opportunities alone doesn't drive the aggression. It is actually less likely that moving out females helps reduce conflict between males than the opposite. Females are generally more tolerant of living in a hierarchy (which is why betta sororities can work whereas betta fraternities are a bad idea). For all of the bubble nesters (which includes most popular gourami species) males have a tendency to be territorial. Since in nature they wouldn't know when a female swims by, this behaviour is still observed when females are absent, though their presence certainly won't help in making relations between males any better. Something that may help is to destroy bubble nests when they appear, as these are essentially "stakes" by males claiming that spot for their future offspring, and they will be less tolerant of nearby rivals. Turning up the surface agitation a little so that no one will be tempted to build a nest but not so much that it would bother the adult fish is a strategy you could try.
For females, the presence of males may actually contribute a lot to aggression, as they suddenly have to compete in a group whereas they don't have to when no males are nearby. Females don't have (much of) the same territorial or nest-care instincts and are less likely to spar if no breeding opportunity presents itself. Again though, individual females may just be very assertive and the only solution is moving them to a different tank.
 

Donthemon

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They might. Get another tank or bring one back by to the fish store
 

Falena

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I agree with Donthemon. I accidentally ended up with two male thick lipped gourami once, and once they reached sexual maturity they got really nasty with each other and both golds and dwarfs can be pretty aggressive anyway. I'd recommend choosing one
 
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