Help, can not explain this excessive poo

Jherly

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Hello, I have a ten gallon tank with one Molly, one betta and an algae eater. I cleaned their tank yesterday, then today there is an excessive amount of poo. One strand is so long that it curls numerous times. I wish I could post the picture so everyone could see. I put Tetra PH and a dechlorination in each time I clean. Any thoughts? It appears it is coming from the Algae.. Thx
 

Chris99

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Welcome to fishlore. What do you mean by algae eater? If it is a type of pleco then yes they are poo machines. Also I'm not aware of a pleco that can be kept in a 10 gallon tank. If it is an actual Chinese algae eater (I doubt it is a Siamese or other type) that isn't quite as big. I suggest on figuring out exactly what type of fish it is and reading up on the care requirements. And don't trust what the person at the store told you.
 

IKnowNothing

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Not exactly the point but I'll mention it anyways. Molly's should not be kept in a 10g and bettas need to be alone. Since you said algae eater I'm going to assume it's a Chinese algae eater, and if I'm correct those guys are not the best at algae eating and also get crazy aggressive when older.

Sent from my HTC Desire 601 using Fish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum mobile app
 

Danjamesdixon

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Welcome to the forum

As mentioned, it would help if you told us what your "Algae Eater" actually is.

Does it look like this -

Or this? - http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/fish-pictures/chinese-algae-eater-1266568359-800.jpg

Either way, it should not be kept in a 10gallon. They both get far too big/have bioloads that are far too large. It's also been mentioned, keeping a Molly and a Betta together is a recipe for disaster. You'll most likely wake up one day and find your Molly dead.

Is there any reason you are using a pH balancer? Messing around with pH usually causes far more damage than good.
 

Sarcasm Included

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Welcome to fishlore.

You are going to hear a lot of comments about your stock and may think your getting attacked. Please understand that most pet shops sell you fish without the proper knowledge of the requirements of those fish. Don't get discouraged as we are only out to help you put together a tank that you can enjoy in the long run and comments like you can't put a molly in a 10 gallon tank, are to head off problems in the future. Mollies are very active swimmers and grow between 3-7 inches depending on the particular species. Leaving him in the 10 gallon will stunt his growth, shorten his lifespan, create aggression issues, and as you have noticed leave a lot of poop to clean. The betta is a loner of a fish, that while sometimes can be kept with other fish, they are notorious for killing off tank mates when you aren't looking. It really is a 50/50 toss up as to whether the betta will kill the molly or the molly will end up killing the betta. Mollies are notorious bullies and male could very well begin harassing the much slower betta, damaging his fins and creating a lot of stress which leads to diseases. This is something we don't want you to experience because we would like you to stay in the fishkeeping hobby. Depending upon what the algae eater is, they can range from just under 2 inches to over 20 inches. Even the small one, otoclinclus requires a group, making it unsuitable for a 10 gallon. If you actually need an algae eater, which can usually be fixed without, a nerite snail is probably the best for a 10 gallon.

Unfortunately, what I am saying is, that it would be best that you either go with the betta and return the others. Go with the molly and get a 20 gallon or larger tank. Take back all the fish and we will give you options for the 10 gallon that will work better. BTW, if you are not familiar with it, please read this link to the nitrogen cycle. Single most important thing to keeping your fish alive.
 

aHumanBeing

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Welcome to fishlore

Keep your questions coming, we're here to help.

If it's a Common Pleco then that would be the reason for huge poops. Also they don't actually clean tanks, they sort of clean algae but they poop more than an elephant.
 
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Jherly

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Gosh, all of these fish are ones the store told me could go in a 10 gallon. I have had all three together for 7 months. I feel awful now. I looked up the picture of the algae aka common pleco, it is in fact him. I will convert them to a larger tank asap. I use tank tester strips and it suggested my water was hard, thus why I used the Easy Balance Plus. I did initially have one more Molly, however when I brought it home it passed within a couple of hours. I bought the betta as I felt sorry for it being couped up In that small cup and it's fins looked awful and I knew no one would buy It. I purchased the Molly's so they betta would have friends, and the "pleco" was after the fact. Grr this is so frustrating.
 
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Jherly

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Thanks for your response, I looked at the picture online and I do believe it is a common pleco.
 

Chris99

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No worries. We pretty much all started where you are. This is also how MTS (multi tank syndrome) starts. You start with a small tank and slowly add to the collection.

As for the ph adjusting chemicals I would slowly stop using those. Unless your water is extremely hard (more than 8.0) I wouldn't worry about your ph. If it is that hard you can still be OK. Those chemicals can lead to ph swings which are not healthy.
 
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Jherly

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Chris99 said:
No worries. We pretty much all started where you are. This is also how MTS (multi tank syndrome) starts. You start with a small tank and slowly add to the collection.

As for the ph adjusting chemicals I would slowly stop using those. Unless your water is extremely hard (more than 8.0) I wouldn't worry about your ph. If it is that hard you can still be OK. Those chemicals can lead to ph swings which are not healthy.
Thanks, I will work on the new larger tank, after I read up more and then convert them all.
 

Danjamesdixon

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Good to hear you are willing to upgrade!

If he is infact a common, and not a Bristlenose, you're looking at a good 125 gallons in that case. Not exactly a small investment, and if you can't get it quickly, i suggest you rehome the Molly. That way, the Betta can stay in the 10gal and your common/BN can go in the 125/if he's a BN you could get a 25-30gal.
 
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Jherly

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He is definitely a common and not a bristle nose as I just checked both pictures. 125 gallon? Could I house the Molly (he is a orange and black spotted one) and the pleco in a 75 gallon together?
 

Danjamesdixon

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75 gallons is not enough for a Common Pleco. Some disagree, but when you see a fully grown one in a 75 you realize why it isn't enough - yes, it'll be enough to prevent stunting, and to handle the bioload, but he will have zero swimming space. Hardly a thriving existence.

You could house 50 Molly's in a 125, probably even more than that haha. Not much can't be housed in a 125 that a beginner would want to keep.
 

Chris99

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I agree with the above, though if it came down to it a 75 would certainly be better than what he is in now.
 

Anders247

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I'd say 100g minimum for a common pleco, but I agree with all the rest that's been said. Good luck to you!
 
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Jherly

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Danjamesdixon said:
75 gallons is not enough for a Common Pleco. Some disagree, but when you see a fully grown one in a 75 you realize why it isn't enough - yes, it'll be enough to prevent stunting, and to handle the bioload, but he will have zero swimming space. Hardly a thriving existence.

You could house 50 Molly's in a 125, probably even more than that haha. Not much can't be housed in a 125 that a beginner would want to keep.
Okay, I am going to try to find a new home for the Pleco. In the meantime, I will invest in a 100 gallon at least to give him a little more space. Thanks for all of you help, I am going to try to find an actual fish store opposed to Pet store to see if they can assist me as well.
 

Anders247

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Jherly said:
Okay, I am going to try to find a new home for the Pleco. In the meantime, I will invest in a 100 gallon at least to give him a little more space. Thanks for all of you help, I am going to try to find an actual fish store opposed to Pet store to see if they can assist me as well.
Most pet stores are focused on selling fish, but you may find a good one......but I doubt it.
 
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Jherly

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Sarcasm Included said:
Welcome to fishlore.

You are going to hear a lot of comments about your stock and may think your getting attacked. Please understand that most pet shops sell you fish without the proper knowledge of the requirements of those fish. Don't get discouraged as we are only out to help you put together a tank that you can enjoy in the long run and comments like you can't put a molly in a 10 gallon tank, are to head off problems in the future. Mollies are very active swimmers and grow between 3-7 inches depending on the particular species. Leaving him in the 10 gallon will stunt his growth, shorten his lifespan, create aggression issues, and as you have noticed leave a lot of poop to clean. The betta is a loner of a fish, that while sometimes can be kept with other fish, they are notorious for killing off tank mates when you aren't looking. It really is a 50/50 toss up as to whether the betta will kill the molly or the molly will end up killing the betta. Mollies are notorious bullies and male could very well begin harassing the much slower betta, damaging his fins and creating a lot of stress which leads to diseases. This is something we don't want you to experience because we would like you to stay in the fishkeeping hobby. Depending upon what the algae eater is, they can range from just under 2 inches to over 20 inches. Even the small one, otoclinclus requires a group, making it unsuitable for a 10 gallon. If you actually need an algae eater, which can usually be fixed without, a nerite snail is probably the best for a 10 gallon.

Unfortunately, what I am saying is, that it would be best that you either go with the betta and return the others. Go with the molly and get a 20 gallon or larger tank. Take back all the fish and we will give you options for the 10 gallon that will work better. BTW, if you are not familiar with it, please read this link to the nitrogen cycle. Single most important thing to keeping your fish alive.
Thank you for your advice
 

Chris99

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Jherly said:
Okay, I am going to try to find a new home for the Pleco. In the meantime, I will invest in a 100 gallon at least to give him a little more space. Thanks for all of you help, I am going to try to find an actual fish store opposed to Pet store to see if they can assist me as well.
I always try to research in multiple places. Sometimes the local stores give good advice and sometimes they are just trying to sell you something. Don't even trust us, we could all be idiots!

As for the 100 gallon no need to go that big if you don't plan to keep him. A 55 or 75 will do for now and they are much easier to find. It sounds like you caught the bug though so it might be too late.

As for rehoming where do you live? Most larger metro areas will have local clubs with members with large tanks willing to take it.
 
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