Heavy tank on 2nd floor

wishuponafish
  • #1
I have a 150g tall (48x24x30 tall) tank partially filled but I'm afraid of pulling the trigger and filling it up all the way since it's so much weight on a small footprint.
I estimate this thing will weigh around 1900 lbs full, and it's on the second floor of a 10 year old wooden apartment building.
Right now it's nestled on top of an overhanging space surrounded by walls (one on the floor underneath) on 3 sides but not directly on top of any of them.
I could turn it around so that it would be on top of one wall, but would not prefer to.
Does anyone know if it would be okay being on 0 or 1 walls, have had experience with setups like this, or have any idea what kind of expert I can hire to inspect this for me first?
 
Kelvin12
  • #2
Lot of weight on an unknown condition of the floor and structure. Don't mean to put the dampers on your project.
 
Zach72202
  • #3
I filled a 120g same footprint just 24 tall on the 3rd floor.... Welcome to the nut club. I didn't have any issues though.

If you can, just try to put it on a support wall that looks to be built

If you really don't know the structure of the building, its pretty much a gamble.

If you can get the build plans to tell what wall is a 'load bearing' wall, then you will be able to put the tank up against that. Generally external walls and a center wall are load bearing, it varies between house and builder too so.

Is the stand like a large surface area base, or a 4 corners type deal. If it is 4 small points, then I would suggest putting at least some boards or a sheet of plywood down to spread out the weight, but if it is a large base stand, I would probably risk it, but have a backup plan in case something happens. Like a shop vac to clean up water at a minimum, and a level to see how off square it actually is. With a level, check the offset prior to filling and then after to see the change, should give you an idea to how much of an impact it has.
 
Nickguy5467
  • #4
I have the same fears. and i just have a 29 gallon. and the empty 50 im on a second flor
 
wishuponafish
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
I filled a 120g same footprint just 24 tall on the 3rd floor.... Welcome to the nut club. I didn't have any issues though.

If you can, just try to put it on a support wall that looks to be built

If you really don't know the structure of the building, its pretty much a gamble.

If you can get the build plans to tell what wall is a 'load bearing' wall, then you will be able to put the tank up against that. Generally external walls and a center wall are load bearing, it varies between house and builder too so.

Is the stand like a large surface area base, or a 4 corners type deal. If it is 4 small points, then I would suggest putting at least some boards or a sheet of plywood down to spread out the weight, but if it is a large base stand, I would probably risk it, but have a backup plan in case something happens. Like a shop vac to clean up water at a minimum, and a level to see how off square it actually is. With a level, check the offset prior to filling and then after to see the change, should give you an idea to how much of an impact it has.
Thank you, the stand has a flat bottom and I've added 4x4's inside for extra support but I guess I should probably get a structural engineer to check it out if I ever want to fill it all the way. Thankfully my puffer is still a baby (in a 40 breeder for now) and the footprint is what I mainly care about so I'm fine with keeping it filled halfway at most.
 
RayClem
  • #6
A lot depends upon the structure of the apartment and where the tank is located. If the structure is old, it may have been built to lesser construction codes.

Also, putting a large tank out in the middle of the room is a bad idea. It it is located adjacent to a load-bearing wall, or even better in a corner where two load-bearing walls join, then the structure will be able to support more weight.

I have a 55 gallon aquarium out in the middle of my family room over a basement area. That has been perfectly stable, but I would never risk putting a 90 gallon tank in that same location. And your tank is taller and heavier than my 90 gallon would have been. I had no issue with the 90 gallon tank against a load-bearing wall., but placing it in the middle of the room would have been risky.

Have you looked at your rental agreement? I know that many landlords limit the size of aquariums they allow in their apartments. They are concerned both with the structural integrity of the building and the potential damage to both your apartment and others below you should there be a leak. It is amazing at the damage water can do.
 
wishuponafish
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
A lot depends upon the structure of the apartment and where the tank is located. If the structure is old, it may have been built to lesser construction codes.

Also, putting a large tank out in the middle of the room is a bad idea. It it is located adjacent to a load-bearing wall, or even better in a corner where two load-bearing walls join, then the structure will be able to support more weight.

I have a 55 gallon aquarium out in the middle of my family room over a basement area. That has been perfectly stable, but I would never risk putting a 90 gallon tank in that same location. And your tank is taller and heavier than my 90 gallon would have been. I had no issue with the 90 gallon tank against a load-bearing wall., but placing it in the middle of the room would have been risky.

Have you looked at your rental agreement? I know that many landlords limit the size of aquariums they allow in their apartments. They are concerned both with the structural integrity of the building and the potential damage to both your apartment and others below you should there be a leak. It is amazing at the damage water can do.
The building is 10 years old, and of course I have permission for the tank.
My description may have been confusing but it's in a small alcove directly above a flight of stairs so it's not in the middle of the room. There are 3 walls in the first floor that are all about a foot away from the sides of the tank. I can't tell for sure if any of them are load-bearing though.
I'm definitely gonna get an engineer to check it out before I fill it up all the way.
 
Zach72202
  • #8
Thank you, the stand has a flat bottom and I've added 4x4's inside for extra support but I guess I should probably get a structural engineer to check it out if I ever want to fill it all the way. Thankfully my puffer is still a baby (in a 40 breeder for now) and the footprint is what I mainly care about so I'm fine with keeping it filled halfway at most.
I believe you said you have a fahaka puffer in another post? A 150g tank would be really good for him, but have you considered going with a 5' or 6' tank that isn't as tall? As I stated, I had a 4' 120g that was 24" deep and it was so bad to have to work in. Always wet up to your armpits. A 150g 30" tall sounds even less so pleasant.

Not trying to say what you have is bad, but if you got a 5' or 6' tank that would better disperse weight and also be much easier to work in.

Since it seems you are renting, an acrylic would give you peace of mind as well. A 180g (72x24x24) or 150g (72L x 24W x 20H) would only run probably around $1,200 (at least where I work), and cut down on weight. You have a bit before an upgrade is necessary.

The building is 10 years old, and of course I have permission for the tank.
My description may have been confusing but it's in a small alcove directly above a flight of stairs so it's not in the middle of the room. There are 3 walls in the first floor that are all about a foot away from the sides of the tank. I can't tell for sure if any of them are load-bearing though.
I'm definitely gonna get an engineer to check it out before I fill it up all the way.

Honestly in this instance a picture is worth a thousand words. As I am understanding it, the tank is right above a stairwell, which doesn't sound super safe to me, but I am not a builder, so take that with a grain of salt.
 
wishuponafish
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
I believe you said you have a fahaka puffer in another post? A 150g tank would be really good for him, but have you considered going with a 5' or 6' tank that isn't as tall? As I stated, I had a 4' 120g that was 24" deep and it was so bad to have to work in. Always wet up to your armpits. A 150g 30" tall sounds even less so pleasant.

Not trying to say what you have is bad, but if you got a 5' or 6' tank that would better disperse weight and also be much easier to work in.

Since it seems you are renting, an acrylic would give you peace of mind as well. A 180g (72x24x24) or 150g (72L x 24W x 20H) would only run probably around $1,200 (at least where I work), and cut down on weight. You have a bit before an upgrade is necessary.



Honestly in this instance a picture is worth a thousand words. As I am understanding it, the tank is right above a stairwell, which doesn't sound super safe to me, but I am not a builder, so take that with a grain of salt.
I'm renting and don't have much space so it was a tough choice between a 4x2' bottom and 6x1.5', but I went with the 4x2 because it'll fit better in my apartment and I figured a potentially near-1.5 foot long fish would want more than 1.5 feet of width to turn around in. With the glass shortage it was impossible to get anything else (would have preferred 120) but I got a very good deal on this one used.

The ideal size would have been 180g which has the best of both worlds, which I am planning to get when I buy a house. In the future I want to move the puffer to that and convert the 150 into a monodactylus tank or something, so don't worry I'll make sure he's comfortable! Lol.
 

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