Healthy food for a dog

idkausernamesoyeah

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ik this isn't for fish haha but im looking for a good high quality food for dogs lmk if u have any suggestions or whatever. we r thinking of getting a hypoallergenic dog (rescued ofc) and idk waht kind to get!!! preferably one that isn't messy and is good with a family if anyone has an idea of food or a type of dog to get please respond
 

SM1199

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I work at a vet hospital, and I can say the most important thing is don't get a grain-free food. They have a high incidence of dogs developing heart disease. Also, avoid brands that are more centered around advertising, like Blue Buffalo or Pedigree, than they are about developing balanced foods.

Stick to your basics like Purina Proplan, Hills Science Diet, or Royal Canin. They are well-balanced and backed up by vets, including all the ones I work for.

Honestly, as far as choosing a dog goes - keep an eye out for individuals that interest you rather than restricting yourself to a specific breed, especially if you're going through rescues and shelters. When you see one you're interested in, go and visit, and bring everyone in your house to make sure it's a good fit! You will know when you've found the right one. If you or your family truly need a hypoallergenic dog, then you will probably have to go through a breeder, unless you get lucky and find a purebred hypoallergenic dog in a shelter.

Good luck!
 

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my dog is currently on nature’s recipe dry and wet. It’s a middle of the price range and healthy options as she is on grain free for allergies. It’s still a brand found at grocery stores so I’m sure there are even healthier one can suggest. It depends on your budget. My dog has had two bouts of pancreatitis so the vet suggested to go lower in fat so not I’m doing natures recipe wet foods mostly. My dog is 12 and my cat is 14 and what I have found is older animals do better on soft food Not sure the age or need of dog you are considering.
 

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I’ve heard about this, my dog is on grain fee and her allergy/itching has been greatly reduced and she has lost weight. The allergy meds they prescribe aren’t great and have side effects as well not to mention they are super expensive.
 

AJ34

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SM1199 said:
I work at a vet hospital, and I can say the most important thing is don't get a grain-free food. They have a high incidence of dogs developing heart disease. Also, avoid brands that are more centered around advertising, like Blue Buffalo or Pedigree, than they are about developing balanced foods.

Stick to your basics like Purina Proplan, Hills Science Diet, or Royal Canin. They are well-balanced and backed up by vets, including all the ones I work for.

Honestly, as far as choosing a dog goes - keep an eye out for individuals that interest you rather than restricting yourself to a specific breed, especially if you're going through rescues and shelters. When you see one you're interested in, go and visit, and bring everyone in your house to make sure it's a good fit! You will know when you've found the right one. If you or your family truly need a hypoallergenic dog, then you will probably have to go through a breeder, unless you get lucky and find a purebred hypoallergenic dog in a shelter.

Good luck!
I know many people are doing raw diets is that bad as well?
 

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AJ34 said:
I’ve heard about this, my dog is on grain fee and her allergy/itching has been greatly reduced and she has lost weight. The allergy meds they prescribe aren’t great and have side effects as well not to mention they are super expensive.
I do agree with this. There are sometimes medical reasons to go on grain-free. The issue is when people put their dog who doesn't have allergies onto a food they don't need because they think, for whatever reason, that it's better. In reality, there is only a very small percentage of dogs who actually have allergies to grain, but again, the ones who do should be on the grain-free food.
 

AJ34

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SM1199 said:
I do agree with this. There are sometimes medical reasons to go on grain-free. The issue is when people put their dog who doesn't have allergies onto a food they don't need because they think, for whatever reason, that it's better. In reality, there is only a very small percentage of dogs who actually have allergies to grain, but again, the ones who do should be on the grain-free food.
Thanks for your insight ! I wonder is it something that is being added to store bought grain free foods versus the lack of grains itself? I looked up a study and it looked like a lot of very expensive grain free and presumably healthier brands. I found that interesting..
 

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AJ34 said:
I know many people are doing raw diets is that bad as well?
Yes and no. Raw diets are a bit of a fad, and when fads are involved with pet food, they are often unbalanced because they're not developed by scientists and not backed up by vets. But hey, people pay for it and they sell, so people think it's good!

Raw diets can be balanced if the proper ingredients are included. My vets are all on the fence about raw diets. Again, if there's no medical need for it, they'd rather not see them on raw diets because they can pose a health risk and they may or may not be balanced depending on the brand vs homemade, etc. However, we do have a few clients with shepherds that have very sensitive stomachs, and a raw diet is the only way to keep their stomachs settled.
 

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AJ34 said:
Thanks for your insight ! I wonder is it something that is being added to store bought grain free foods versus the lack of grains itself? I looked up a study and it looked like a lot of very expensive grain free and presumably healthier brands. I found that interesting..
The research done on grain free is very recent, and so they haven't yet pinpointed the exact reason it's causing heart disease. They believe that it is due to the lack of grain causing a taurine deficiency, rather than something else being added that is detrimental, but right now that is just a hypothesis.
 

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My Visla, is runs very long distances, and as such needs a nutritious diet. We usually give him a mix of wet foods, and purina one balanced diet Salmon flavored, and it seems to do the trick. Also every once and a while we give him some hard boiled eggs, as well as chicken.
 

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That depends on a lot of different things such as what breed the dog is, it's age, any health concerns, etc. You should ask what the owners are feeding it currently then once you get the dog bring it for a vet check up and ask them if they have any recommendations.

You will almost certainly end up with a mutt if you want to adopt or rescue- which is fine, mutts can be great! Just know that with mutts you likely won't find a hypoallergenic (they need to be purebred), you have no idea of it's medical history, and if they're a rescue they can have some pretty weird behavioural issues. You'll want to make sure you go to a trusted rescue or shelter with people who know what they're doing. Too often do people try to rehome pets that are too traumatized or need such intense medical care that they should really just be either put down or kept by a professional. Some will lie and say dogs are a mix of breeds or a purebred when in reality it just looks like one.

If you're super lucky you may find a purebred rescue- my own dog is one of these rare finds. He is a treeing walker coonhound and we have his vet records from the original breeder. We weren't looking for anything specific and just happened across him after months of searching. His diet consists of a rotation of a few different trusted dog food brands as well as home cooked meals. We have talked to our vets about his diet as well as the diet of our past dogs so that we can be sure he's getting what he needs. Always remember that your vet is trying to help you but can only do so if you're open and honest and actually listen to them!

If you need a hypoallergenic dog you may have an easier time going to a breeder. Again you'd want to go to an experienced and trusted one- do lots of research. There seems to currently be a very big anti-breeder thing going on where people make it seem like the only morally okay option is to rescue or adopt- this is silly. Ethical breeders are trying to better the breeds and do their absolute best to ensure their dogs are healthy and happy. They know what issues their dogs may be predisposed to and what sort of personality it will have.

In general- with a dog from a good breeder you know what you're getting while with a rescue or shelter all bets are off.
 

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We feed Lola (2 year old 10lb maltese/shitzhu/ toy poodle) chicken soup for the soul small bite.
we first fed her acana (came with her) that wasn’t cost efficient ($70), so we tried taste of the wild,
and she wasn't enthusiastic about eating. We came across chicken soup for the soul small bites and she love it! She was so excited to eat! So that’s what we feed her now.
512DA345-2423-4D52-81B1-B0E4076C017B.jpeg
 

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I will vouch for Purina ProPlan as a good food. Whenever me and my family researched food, we kept finding that ProPlan was reccomended by the people who know their stuff. Our dogs do better on it than any other brand we've tried. The breeder of our younger dog, Chance, also highly recommends it. And that woman is so much more than just a dog breeder, she is incredibly knowledgeable on canine health issues and pours over new research like crazy. She's dedicated her whole life to dogs.

To add on to what Salem said, if you go with a breeder stay away from 'designer' breeds like Goldendoodles, Labradoodles, ect. I can go on a whole rant on why, but to make things short they're almost never bred by ethical breeders and they are a mixed bag of temperament, size, and allergy level. I can give you a whole list of do's and don'ts with breeders. I did a huge amount of research when we were getting our dogs and it's all ingrained into my mind.
 

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We have 2 14 month old rescue lab hound mixes and was having problems finding a good food we started off with taste of the wild grain free then when their stool wasnt solid ( sorry gross i know ) we went to grain n they did ok then it went back to not looking so good now they are back on Taste of the wild adult grain free foods and they are doing very well with it.
 
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idkausernamesoyeah

idkausernamesoyeah

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SM1199 said:
I work at a vet hospital, and I can say the most important thing is don't get a grain-free food. They have a high incidence of dogs developing heart disease. Also, avoid brands that are more centered around advertising, like Blue Buffalo or Pedigree, than they are about developing balanced foods.

Stick to your basics like Purina Proplan, Hills Science Diet, or Royal Canin. They are well-balanced and backed up by vets, including all the ones I work for.

Honestly, as far as choosing a dog goes - keep an eye out for individuals that interest you rather than restricting yourself to a specific breed, especially if you're going through rescues and shelters. When you see one you're interested in, go and visit, and bring everyone in your house to make sure it's a good fit! You will know when you've found the right one. If you or your family truly need a hypoallergenic dog, then you will probably have to go through a breeder, unless you get lucky and find a purebred hypoallergenic dog in a shelter.

Good luck!
do hypoallergenic dogs need to be purebred??
 
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idkausernamesoyeah

idkausernamesoyeah

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Salem said:
That depends on a lot of different things such as what breed the dog is, it's age, any health concerns, etc. You should ask what the owners are feeding it currently then once you get the dog bring it for a vet check up and ask them if they have any recommendations.

You will almost certainly end up with a mutt if you want to adopt or rescue- which is fine, mutts can be great! Just know that with mutts you likely won't find a hypoallergenic (they need to be purebred), you have no idea of it's medical history, and if they're a rescue they can have some pretty weird behavioural issues. You'll want to make sure you go to a trusted rescue or shelter with people who know what they're doing. Too often do people try to rehome pets that are too traumatized or need such intense medical care that they should really just be either put down or kept by a professional. Some will lie and say dogs are a mix of breeds or a purebred when in reality it just looks like one.

If you're super lucky you may find a purebred rescue- my own dog is one of these rare finds. He is a treeing walker coonhound and we have his vet records from the original breeder. We weren't looking for anything specific and just happened across him after months of searching. His diet consists of a rotation of a few different trusted dog food brands as well as home cooked meals. We have talked to our vets about his diet as well as the diet of our past dogs so that we can be sure he's getting what he needs. Always remember that your vet is trying to help you but can only do so if you're open and honest and actually listen to them!

If you need a hypoallergenic dog you may have an easier time going to a breeder. Again you'd want to go to an experienced and trusted one- do lots of research. There seems to currently be a very big anti-breeder thing going on where people make it seem like the only morally okay option is to rescue or adopt- this is silly. Ethical breeders are trying to better the breeds and do their absolute best to ensure their dogs are healthy and happy. They know what issues their dogs may be predisposed to and what sort of personality it will have.

In general- with a dog from a good breeder you know what you're getting while with a rescue or shelter all bets are off.
yeah ur totally right that whole stigma is what got to me!!! idk i think rescuing is so much better than buying from a breeder but idk. um my brother is allergic and has been on shots for 8 years and is now starting to get off of them so we rgetting a hypoallergenic one just to be safe
 

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idkausernamesoyeah said:
do hypoallergenic dogs need to be purebred??
Yes. You can never be sure what other breeds a mixed breed dog has in it, and dogs will not be hypoallergenic as long as there is a single recent ancestor that was not a hypoallergenic breed.

There are crosses that claim to be hypoallergenic, like all the poodle crosses (labradoodle, golden doodle), and while they might not be as bad as the non-hypoallergenic parent breed, they are certainly not nearly as hypoallergenic as a poodle. Plus, like what was mentioned above, there is very little consistency among these designer crosses, and you never know exactly what you'll get in terms of temperament, health, etc. and they are being bred like crazy because they are expensive!! So most breeders you find will be people who just go "Oh, well I'll just get a bunch of intact labs and a bunch of intact poodles, and I'll be making so much money!" with little consideration for the welfare of the animals.
 

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*raises hand guiltily* we feed our dog cat food.

When we first got him, (as a puppy from a very reputable breeder,) I think we fed him puppy food, (I was 6 lol) and then probably regular dog food, but when we got cats again he always wanted to eat the cat food, and after trying many things, the easiest solution was to just feed him the same stuff as the cats.

None of our animals ever over-eat and so we just have a communal wide food bowl for everyone that always has food in it.

This is probably the worst solution, though.
 
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SM1199 said:
Yes. You can never be sure what other breeds a mixed breed dog has in it, and dogs will not be hypoallergenic as long as there is a single recent ancestor that was not a hypoallergenic breed.

There are crosses that claim to be hypoallergenic, like all the poodle crosses (labradoodle, golden doodle), and while they might not be as bad as the non-hypoallergenic parent breed, they are certainly not nearly as hypoallergenic as a poodle. Plus, like what was mentioned above, there is very little consistency among these designer crosses, and you never know exactly what you'll get in terms of temperament, health, etc. and they are being bred like crazy because they are expensive!! So most breeders you find will be people who just go "Oh, well I'll just get a bunch of intact labs and a bunch of intact poodles, and I'll be making so much money!" with little consideration for the welfare of the animals.
wow that's so sad!! ill have to look into that. anyone know of a reputable breeder near bergen county nj? i also just figured if a hypoallergenic dog trait or whatever was in it it would be dominant
 

aoiumi

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idkausernamesoyeah said:
wow that's so sad!! ill have to look into that. anyone know of a reputable breeder near bergen county nj? i also just figured if a hypoallergenic dog trait or whatever was in it it would be dominant
As far as I know, it's something that has a lot of different genes that affect it, which means there's levels of hypoallergenic.
 

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