Has anyone used garden creeping jenny in their aquarium?

Mahis

Has anyone used creeping jenny/charlie from their garden in their aquarium?

And

Has anyone used some aspargus ferns, Boston ferns, plantain lillies or aloe vera in their aquarium?
 

RayClem

There are many plants that grow around the margins of lakes, ponds and streams. As such, they can often grow both emerged and submerged. Many plants in the aquarium trade are from this group. In fact, many of these plants are grown emerged (with leaves out of water) with the intention of being adapted to submerged conditions after purchase. The advantage of growing plants emerged is that they are exposed to high levels of light and CO2 which promotes growth rates.

You have to be careful relying on the common names of plants as sometimes the same plant is called by multiple names and in other cases a few different plants may be sold under the same common name. Thus, I hesitate to suggest that your specimens of these plants will be suitable for aquarium use.

What I would suggest is filling a few cups with aquarium water and then partially submerging cuttings from the plants in the water and placing the cups in a warm, sunny place. Observe the appearance of the plants for a few weeks. If the plants seem to be thriving, then try to add them to your aquarium.
 

Mahis

There are many plants that grow around the margins of lakes, ponds and streams. As such, they can often grow both emerged and submerged. Many plants in the aquarium trade are from this group. In fact, many of these plants are grown emerged (with leaves out of water) with the intention of being adapted to submerged conditions after purchase. The advantage of growing plants emerged is that they are exposed to high levels of light and CO2 which promotes growth rates.

You have to be careful relying on the common names of plants as sometimes the same plant is called by multiple names and in other cases a few different plants may be sold under the same common name. Thus, I hesitate to suggest that your specimens of these plants will be suitable for aquarium use.

What I would suggest is filling a few cups with aquarium water and then partially submerging cuttings from the plants in the water and placing the cups in a warm, sunny place. Observe the appearance of the plants for a few weeks. If the plants seem to be thriving, then try to add them to your aquarium.
Alright alright makes sense. So I should take some cuttings and put them in a cup of old tank water or something and see if they grow. I'll keep some submerged and some emerged. I'll use cuttings, and some that have terrestrial roots. I'll update if anything happens.
 

Cue

I will tell you, aloe vera WILL die immersed. I water mine once every 3-5 months and it thrives, the most common issue with new succulent keepers is watering them too often (once a week)
 

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