has anyone tried these community members together?

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zpecialt

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I am looking to start a new aquarium and I have been out of the game for a few years. I've looked at either a 36 gallon corner unit with a larger surface area or a standard rectangular 40 gallon tank. For the freshwater community, I am considering gradually building up to a bala shark, two fancy goldfish, a pleco, a school of either silver dollars or cherry barbs, and a red tail shark (maybe). I would really love to also have an angelfish, but I'm not too confident in adding one to that mix.

Does anyone have any advice on which aquarium might be better and whether or not those fish would be compatible, happy roommates? I've read all the freshwater fish profiles and have visited my local pet stores for advice, but I'm still unsure of the combination.
 

COBettaCouple

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The goldfish may be out of place since they'd like colder water than the others. The pleco you'd want to get dwarf ones (or get a few corys & a few ottos instead) or have an idea of a good pond home for him when he gets too big. The barbs might be a problem as they're more aggressive fish.

I think either tank is good, but I'd probably lean towards the 40 gallon myself - tough decision though because i love the corner tanks.. i guess i'd just say base it on your available space where you want the tank to be.
 

sirdarksol

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I agree with the statement that the fancy goldfish might be out of place.
However...
If you look at my tropical tank, I've got a goldfish that's been living happily in it for at least 6 months (that's when I got the tank). Goldfish actually can live in pretty warm water (in fact, their preferred breeding temperature is near 80).
Total agreement about the pleco. Another option, other than otos, for a small algae cleaner is a peckoltia. If you can find one, they only get to be a few inches, but you can find them with the same types of patterns as plecos.
 

Neville

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hi, welcome to fishlore , i think a 36 gallon tank is too small for all those fish if u put them together, bala sharks grow up to 13 inches, usually they need a 40 gallon tank and goldfish will not be a good tankmate for the balas. plecos also grow up to 18 inches. angels r territorial and it is better if u don't keep them with plecos, barbs r schooling fish and u have to keep at least 6 f them together.

moreover if u keep so many species of tropical fish together in a 36 or 40 gallon tank it will introduce more diseases and parasites. so i will suggest u should start with only 2 bala sharks or the fish u like most for now and then if u see everything is fine u can add some more fish later on; if it is possible.
 

susitna-flower

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Hi, zpecialt! It is a really good thing to research all your fish before you buy. If you check out the link at the top of this page Tropical Fish Information, you can get lots of information on all the fish you are wanting before you choose that tank for sure. You have several listed that you want that really do need a large tank. Bala sharks are beautiful, but do best in a 'school' of at least three. They grow large, and like a long run to swim, so a rectangular tank is best, for them.
If you adhere to the 1 inch per gallon rule for all the small fish, remember to calculate it on how big the fish will be as an adult ! (this really only works on small fish, because larger fish have more mass so you have to figure more like 1" for 2-3 gallons)
When you choose a pleco, if you have a tank less than 75 gallons, I suggest you go for a bristlenose, or some other dwarf type, or a combination of a bristlenose and 3-5 otos, this will provide plenty of algae controll, but with less waste than a common pleco produces. Don't get talked into getting any pleco that is known to grow over 12 inches, and many grow up to 18" or bigger! They grow fast, and make quite a mess in the tank. Another thing you may have someone in the fish store suggest is a Chinease Algae Eater, WATCH OUT, they get very aggressive, and after about 4" in length, stop eating algae as much.
I would also suggest 3-5 corys to help clean up the food that falls to the bottom of the tank. They need to be in a group of their same color combination, don't mix as they are more comfortable this way, and will move about the tank more efficiently.

The fancy goldfish are not a good match with an otherwise tropical tank, as they have different water temperature requirements.

Barbs are a fun active fish, but if you want angles, or anything with fancy tails, barbs are not a good choice they can be fin nippers and to help keep this at a minimum you need 6 or more of the same fish.

One of the most beautiful, easy to raise fish I know, that you may like to look into are rainbow fish. They are peaceful, great for community tanks. They are healthy fish with vibrant colors. Your local fish store may not carry them as a rule, as they are just a little more expensive, but well worth the extra expense! To get the most out of them you need to get 2 or 3 and hopefully a mix of males and females, as their color changes occur as the males are showing off for the girls!

Good Luck
Fish in the Frozen North 8)
 

jri4

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Instead of a pleco (unless u go dwarf pleco) get an oto cat or two and 3 corys. Both stay at around 3 inches (so that's only 15 inches of the 40 gallon tank). A school of barbs (6 or 7) adds another 12 so thats totals 27 inches, leaving plenty room for Angels (be cautious) or another larger fish. Here is a compatibilty chart, so use it to decide what you want in the tank. I would do anything to be able to afford a 40 gallon tank..... :-\ ;D
 

jri4

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danios, rainbowfish, corys, and rasboras will all be compatible with angelfish, so consider these instead of barbs. The new glolight danios seem cool, and are not dyed, but genetically engineered. I love my zebra danios, they will definitely add excitement to the tank if kept in a school of about 8!
 

COBettaCouple

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I just read a post mentioning ghost shrimp as an option for algae control. Would those work with the desired fish? and would they be a better option than a dwarf pleco or some otos?
 

JMatt1983

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red tail sharks and cherry barbs get along really well, i've had them together for a while before my cherries into the larger tank, my shark didn't like the gourami lol silver dollars need a tall tank, rather than a long one, as they can get quite large vertically, goldfish are cold water fish, and have different food needs than the tropical fish, as for angel fish, i'd be careful with them around the smaller cherry barbs, as they good find them to be a tasty midnight snack, a common pleco requires minimum 50 gallons, try maybe a bristlenose or a dwarf if you find them, if not, go with 3 or more oto catfish, or cories, i have an upside down catfish that does a great cleanup job, but i would go with a 40gallon, gives you a little more flexibility, and i think you can find corner units in the size as well
 
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zpecialt

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Thank you everyone. I have already reviewed the tropical fish profiles on the site, but it's still somewhat difficult determining who would be happy with whom. I figured the best bet is to ask those with the experience. I still have a few weeks more to research before I start setting everything up and I have a few of the recommended books on the way from Amazon. THANKS AGAIN!
 

susitna-flower

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One last bit of advice, ghost shrimp do eat algae, but not nearly as much as otos or a bristlenose pleco. The shrimp tend to hide from fish, as they make a nice meal for some, so aren't very effective in a community tank.
Fish in the Frozen North 8)
 
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